SAHARATV: Of Sanusi, Sexting, And Sexual Harassment: Skype Callers Sound Off After last  weekend’s Sahara TV broadcasts “Talk Back” skype session, important questions were raised concerning the sexual (mis)conduct of Nigerian officials and their subordinates. ...

After last  weekend’s Sahara TV broadcasts “Talk Back” skype session, important questions were raised concerning the sexual (mis)conduct of Nigerian officials and their subordinates.

Much of this concern arises after news arose that Central Bank of Nigeria Governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi is allegedly engaged in an affair with a Mrs. Maryam Yaro, assistant director and subordinate to the governor.

Moral questions aside (both Sanusi and Yaro are married with children), the alleged affair, which involves a series of incriminating texts, extended hotel stays, and secret professions of love, is also raising eyebrows because of violations of the Nigerian Constitution’s Public Officers Code of Conduct it embraces.

Sources inside the bank claim that these latest developments are part of a culture of impropriety and immorality that Sanusi has instituted during his tenure as governor. One insider, who requested to remain anonymous claimed that such practices have permeated the hiring and employment processes at the CBN.

“This man (Sanusi) is the most morally bankrupt governor the CBN has ever had,” the source told PREMIUM TIMES. “Forget all the pretences, he is a shameless man of loose character.”

Our Skype callers during this week’s Talk Back session echoed similar sentiments, saying things along the lines of “I’m very ashamed. He is someone I looked up to as a mentor,” and “fidelity is a key arm of integrity”. Proponents of such serious scrutiny of government officials were also extremely vocal on Twitter. Several sounded off about the need for public officials to maintain a critical commitment to morally upstanding lifestyles, as reflections of both the government and the people.

Conversely, some callers and tweeters felt differently, advocating for a thorough investigation and due process for Sanusi: “this thing about Sanusi has not been verified,” one caller said, “it might just be propaganda.” “It’s Sanusi’s personal life, as long as it is not affecting his work,” another followed up. That Sanusi should be believed innocent until proven guilty versus the hyperfocused scrutiny others believed was necessary was a major component of the Skype debate and filtered into the interactions of others in the social media sphere.

Ultimately, callers and tweeters were relatively united on solutions to such issues, calling for a tighter and more heavily enforced code of conduct and external investigations of public officials. Such solutions, they believed, might indeed help curb such instances of corruption within government agencies and departments.

Watch the stream here:
 http://youtu.be/bGqirC1jz2k

Link to code of conduct:

http://unpan1.un.org/intradoc/groups/public/documents/aapam/unpan038432.pdf
 

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