Full Report of The $6.8 Billion Fuel Subsidy Scam

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REPORT OF THE AD-HOC COMMITTEE
AND MONITOR THE IMPLEMENTATION OF THE SUBSIDY REGIME IN NIGERIA‟
RESOLUTION NO. (HR.1/2012)
„TO VERIFY AND DETERMINE THE ACTUAL SUBSIDY REQUIREMENTS
LAID ON WEDNESDAY 18TH APRIL, 2012
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TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGES 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Glossary of Terms List of Annextures, Tables and Appendixes CHAPTER 1: Executive Summary CHAPTER 2: Preamble & Terms of Reference CHAPTER 3: Methodology A. Modus Operandi B. Invited Companies C. Invited Federal Government Agencies D. Invited Professional Groups & Individuals CHAPTER 4: Existing Subsidy Regime A. The Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) B. Principles of the PSF C. Responsibilities of Stakeholders/Operators CHAPTER 5: Associated Infrastructures A. Refineries B. Tank Farms, Depots & Storage Capacities C. Retail Outlets & Storage Capacities D. Jetties E. Barges F. Ports CHAPTER 6: Observations and Findings Section A: Government Agencies Section B: Marketers Section C: Forensic Investigation (Maritime) Section D: Forensic Investigation (Financial) CHAPTER 7: Recommendations CHAPTER 8: Conclusion Attestation 2 i - ii iii - iv 3 – 12 13 – 15 16 – 26 16 – 18 19 – 23 24 – 25 26 27 – 49 27 28 – 30 30 – 49 50 – 71 50 51 – 60 61 – 64 65 – 69 70 71 72 – 184 72 – 124 125 – 131 132 – 142 143 – 184 185 – 202 203 – 205 205
6.
7.
8.
9. 10. 11.
CHAPTER ONE
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Following the removal of subsidy on PMS on the 1st day of January, 2012 by the Federal Government of Nigeria and the attendant spontaneous social and political upheavals that greeted the policy, the House of Representatives in an Emergency Session on the 8th of January, 2012 set up an Ad-hoc Committee to verify and determine the actual subsidy requirements and monitor the implementation of the subsidy regime in Nigeria.
The Federal Government had informed the nation of its inability to continue to pump endless amount of money into the seemingly bottomless pit that was referred to as petroleum products subsidy. It explained that the annual subsidy payment was huge, endless and unsustainable. Nigerians were led to believe that the colossal payments made were solely on PMS and HHK actually consumed by Nigerians. Government ascribed the quoted figures to upsurge in international crude price, high exchange rate, smuggling, increase in population and vehicles etc. However, a large section of the population faulted the premise of the Government subsidy figures, maintaining that unbridled corruption and an inefficient and wasteful process accounted for a large part of the payments. To avert a clear and present danger of descent into lawlessness, the leadership of the House of Representatives took the
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bold and decisive action of convening the first ever Emergency Session on a Sunday (8th January, 2012), and set up the Ad-hoc Committee to verify the actual subsidy requirements of the country.
The Committee decided that the scope of this investigation should be for three years 2009 -2011 for the following reasons:  The actual budget expenditure on subsidy for both PMS and HHK was tolerable, being N261.1b in 2006, N278.8b in 2007 and N346.7b in 2008. 5 companies including NNPC were involved in 2006, 10 in 2007 and 19 in 2008 contrasted to 140 in 2011.  Secondly, in line with accounting practice, the Committee decided to investigate three years activities of the scheme.  The Committee could have chosen to limit the investigation to 2011 alone given the scale of escalation of subsidy in that year alone but decided to take three years to establish a trend. The Ad-Hoc Committee held Public Hearings from 16th of January, 2012 to 9th of February, 2012, taking sworn testimonies from 130 witnesses, receiving information from several volunteers, and receiving in evidence over 3,000 volumes of documents.
In the course of the investigations the Ad-Hoc Committee was able to establish the following: 1. Contrary to statutory requirements and other guidelines under the Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) Scheme mandating agencies in the industry to keep reliable information data base, there seemed to be a
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deliberate understanding among the agencies not to do so. This lack of record keeping contributed in no small measure to the decadence and rots the Committee found in the administration of the PSF. This is evident also in the budget preparatory process by MDAs where adequate data is not made available to the National Assembly. The Committee had to resort to forensic analysis and examination of varied and external sources (including the Lloyds List Intelligence) to verify simple transactions. In this regard, the PPPRA is strongly urged to publish henceforth, the PSF accounts on quarterly basis to ensure transparency and openness of the subsidy Scheme.
2. We found out that the subsidy regime, as operated between the period under review (2009 and 2011), were fraught with endemic corruption and entrenched inefficiency. Much of the amount claimed to have been paid as subsidy was actually not for consumed PMS. Government officials made nonsense of the PSF Guidelines due mainly to sleaze and, in some other cases, incompetence. It is therefore apparent that the insistence by top Government officials that the subsidy figures was for products consumed was a clear attempt to mislead the Nigerian people.
3. Thus, contrary to the earlier official figure of subsidy payment of N1.3 Trillion, the Accountant-General of the Federation put forward a figure of N1.6 Trillion, the CBN N1.7 Trillion, while the Committee established subsidy payment of N2,587.087 Trillion as at 31st December, 2011, amounting to more than 900% over the appropriated sum of N245 Billion. This figure of N2, 587.087Trillion is based on the CBN figure of
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N844.944b paid to NNPC, in addition to another figure of N847.942b reflected as withdrawals by NNPC from the excess crude naira account, as well as the sum of N894.201b paid as subsidy to the Marketers. The figure of N847.942b quoted above strongly suggests that NNPC might have been withdrawing from two sources especially when the double withdrawals were also reflected both in 2009 and in 2010. However, it should be noted that as at the time the public hearing was concluded, there were outstanding claims by NNPC and the Marketers in excess of N270billion as subsidy payments for 2011.
Whereas the mandate of the Committee was necessitated by the removal of subsidy, the Committee found out that subsidy payment on kerosene formed an Integra part of the total sum.
4. On its part, NNPC was found not to be accountable to any body or authority. The Corporation, in 2011, processed payment of N310.4 Billion as 2009 – 2011 arrears of subsidy on Kerosene, contrary to a Presidential Directive which removed subsidy on Kerosene in 2009. The Corporation also processed for itself, direct deduction of subsidy payment from amounts it received from other operations such as joint venture before paying the balance to the Federation Account, thereby depleting the shares of States and Local Governments from the distributable pool. Worse still, the direct deduction in 2011 alone, which amounted to N847.942 Billion, was effected without any provision in the Appropriation Act.
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5. While NNPC feasted on the Federation Account to bloat the subsidy payable, some of the marketers were involved in claiming subsidy on products not supplied. PPPRA laid this foundation by allocating volumes of products each quarter to the marketers which it knew were not in conformity with its own guidelines for participation.
6. Our investigation further revealed that certain marketers collected subsidy of over N230.184 Billion on PMS volume of 3,262,960,225 litres that from the records made available to us were not supplied. Apart from proliferation and non-designation of bank accounts for subsidy payment, PPPRA and the OAGF were unable to manage in a transparent manner the two accounts they chose to disclose. There were indications that PPPRA paid N158 Billion to itself in 2009 and N157 Billion in 2010. When confronted, the OAGF was unable to submit details of the bulk payments arrogated to PPPRA and the account from which the bulk sums were disbursed to the supposed beneficiaries.
7. Curiously too, the particular Accountant-General that served during the period 2009 was found to have made payments of equal instalments of N999 Million for a record 128 times within 24 hours on the 12th and 13th of January 2009, totalling N127.872 Billion. The confirmed payments from the CBN records were made to beneficiaries yet to be disclosed by the OAGF or identified by the Committee. We however discovered that only 36 Marketers were participants under the PSF Scheme during this period. Even if there were 128 marketers, it was inconceivable that
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all would have imported the same quantity of products to warrant equal payments.
8. In order to arrive at a probable figure of daily consumption of PMS, the Committee took the entire volume of 14,787,152,340 litres imported by marketers and NNPC in 2011 as recorded by PPPRA and then deducted what we suspected as over-invoiced volume of
3,276,949,993. Thus, the actual volume imported for year 2011 was 11,510,202,347. This manifested into an average daily PMS consumption of 31.5 million litres.
9. However, in 2012 marginal increment of 1.5 million litres a day is recommended in order to take care of unforeseen circumstances, bringing it to 33 million litres per day. And to maintain a strategic reserve, an additional average of seven (7) million litres per day(or 630million litres per Quarter) for the first quarter of 2012 only is recommended. Thus, PPPRA is to use 40 million litres of PMS in the first quarter as its maximum ordering quantity per day. In subsequent quarters PMS daily ordering quantity should be 33 million litres per day. For Kerosene, the Committee recommends a daily ordering quantity of 9 million litres.
10.
On the issue of kerosene subsidy, the Committee strongly
advocated for a Government policy to immediately recommence subsidy payment on the product by urging withdrawal of the 2009 Presidential Directive.
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11.
We also proposed a budget amount of N806.766billion for the 2012
fiscal year for payment of subsidy on PMS and Kerosene.
12. For the 2012 Appropriation Act, the Committee’s recommendation is based on the following follows: PMS: 33,000,000 Litres x N44 (subsidy) x 365 days = N529,980,000.00 Provision for strategic reserve for 1st Quarter of 2012: 7,000,000 x N44 (subsidy) x 90 days N27,720,000.00 HHK 9,000,000 Litres x N101 (subsidy) x 274 days = N249,006,000.00 Total N806,766,000,000.00 Note: Commencement of kerosene subsidy is as from the second quarter of 2012, since the Committee is of the opinion that the product is still not under the subsidy regime. Therefore, the Committee recommends the sum of N806.766billion as subsidy for year 2012.
13.
With regards to the 445,000 bpd allocation to NNPC , the
Committee believes that with the current refining capacity of 53% and the SWAP/Offshore processing arrangement of the balance of 47%, it is sufficient to provide the nation with the following products: a. 40 Million Litres Per Day (MLPD) of PMS, b. 10 MLPD of Kerosene (HHK) c. 8.97 MLPD of Diesel (AGO) , d. 0.62 MLPD of LPG and e. 2.31 MLPD of FO
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It is only AGO whose average daily consumption of 12 million Litres per day will not be achieved in full. Since AGO has been deregulated, other marketers can make up for the 3.03 MLPD AGO shortfalls. The implication of this finding is that if NNPC properly manages the allocation of 445 bpd efficiently, the availability of the products can be achieved by the NNPC alone. This contrasts the situation where in 2009-2011 NNPC got the daily allocation of 445,000bpd and the nation still had to import through Marketers. Curiously, although NNPC confirmed that it makes some savings of about =N= 11.00 per litre refining locally than import, it could not be established that the Corporation reflects this cost differential in its claims to subsidy. The Committee recommends that NNPC be unbundled to make its operations more efficient and transparent and this we believe can be achieved through the passage of a well drafted and comprehensive PIB Bill. All those in the Management and Board of the NNPC directly involved in the infractions identified for the years 2009-2011 should be investigated and prosecuted for abuse of office by the relevant anticorruption agencies.
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14.
Part of the funding sources of the PSF Account is over-recovery
from marketers. This accrues when product landing cost is lower than the Ex-Depot price. The Committee observed that : i. In 2009, there was an over-recovery of N2.766 Billion. This was expected to have been credited to the PSF Account but was not traceable to the official PSF Account disclosed. ii. Furthermore, in the presentation made by Akintola Williams Deloitte it was claimed that the sum of NGN5.27Billion was established as overrecovery in 2009, however, there was no evidence that this money was credited to the PSF Account.
15.
It is our view that the Guidelines of the PSF Scheme, even as
watered down by the Board in 2009, could have salvaged the Scheme if they were observed and enforced. Had the staff of various agencies and government officials not compromised and colluded with certain marketers, the level of corruption would have been minimal. The Committee viewed this fact with serious concern and has suggested measures to ensure that impunity is no longer condoned. Therefore, marketers that had short-changed Nigerians were identified and recommended to make refunds within a time-frame of three months; civil servants were to be sanctioned in accordance with the Civil Service Rules as well as under extant Laws; management staff and top government officials were, based on the gravity of their offences, to be reprimanded, re-deployed, dismissed and, in specific cases,
prosecuted for abuse of office and fraudulent practices.
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16.
The Committee recommended the refund to the treasury the sum of
N1, 067,040,456,171.31 trillion from the under listed for various violations. i.) ii.) iii.) iv.) v.) vi.) NNPC (Kerosene Subsidy) NNPC (Above PPRA recommendation)NNPC (Self discount) Marketers (Total violations of PSF) Companies that refused to appear PPPRA excess payment to self TOTAL N310,414,963,613.00 N285,098,000,000.00 - N108,648,000,000.00 N8,664,352,554.00 N41,936,140,005.31 N312,279,000,000.00 N1,067,040,456,171.31
The Committee believes that if the PSF scheme was properly managed, this sum of N1.070trillion would have been available to the three tiers of Government for budget enhancement.
17.
The Committee recommends that the following transactions be
further investigated by the relevant anti-corruption agencies and determine their level of culpability with a view to making further recoveries; i. Payment of N999m to unnamed entities 128times to the tune of N127.872b ii. Companies who collected Forex to the tune of $402.610b whose utilization is questionable to the Committee. iii. The 72 Companies listed under the financial forensics are hereby recommended for further investigation by the relevant anticorruption agencies with a view to establishing their culpability
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and recovering the sums indicated against their names totalling N230, 184,605,691.00. iv. The Over recoveries of N2.766b and N5.27b which were not accounted for by the office of the Accountant General of the Federation. v. The cases of double deductions by the NNPC for subsidy payments in 2009,2010 and 2011 mentioned in this Report.
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CHAPTER 2 PREAMBLE AND TERMS OF REFERENCE PREAMBLE 2.0.1. Following increase of the pump price of premium motor spirit (petrol/PMS) from N65.00 to N140.00 per litre by the Federal Government of Nigeria, with effect from the 1st day of January, 2012, there were spontaneous demonstrations against this policy in many parts of the country. These were followed by the coordinated actions of Nigeria’s major Trade Unions and their civil society coalition partners, who engendered an unprecedented near complete shutdown of the country through a national strike which commenced on Monday 9th January, 2012. 2.0.2. In announcing the increase, the Federal Government explained that the action was in furtherance of its policy to deregulate the downstream petroleum sector through the removal of subsidy on Petrol which it stated had run into annual amounts in excess of N1 trillion. 2.0.3. Though the nationwide strike, as stated by its organizers, was intended to secure a reversal of the increased PMS pump price to its pre-2012 price of N65.00 per litre, during the debates and street rallies, a number of related issues arose, including but not limited to what could perhaps be described as a national outrage with the opaque nature under which the fuel subsidy regime
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was being operated. There was palpable street and public anger over the lack of transparency which appeared to have manifested in different Government officials mentioning conflicting figures as the total annual subsidy payment for 2011, amounting to N1.3 trillion as against N245Billion that was appropriated. The labour leaders and their coalition partners also disputed the Government figures, and canvassed their own substitute subsidy figures. This cacophony of debates continued amidst a successfully executed nationwide strike which indeed paralyzed productive sectors of the Nigerian economy as well as inflicted harsh dislocations to the social and security well- being of our citizens. 2.0.4. It was against the backdrop of a clear and present danger of gradual descent into anarchy that the Leadership of the House of Representatives took the bold and decisive action of convening the first ever Emergency Session held on a Sunday, 8th January, 2012. 2.0.5. After exhaustive debates by the Honourable Members, the House of Representatives took far reaching decisions which inter alia included a Resolution to set up an Ad-Hoc Committee to investigate the operation of the fuel subsidy regime of the Federal Government of Nigeria. 2.1 TERMS OF REFERENCE 2.1.1 At the Emergency Session of the House of Representatives held on Sunday, 8th January, 2012, the House Resolved inter alia: “to verify and determine the actual subsidy requirements and monitor the implementation of the subsidy regime in Nigeria”.
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2.1.2. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 1. 2. Rep. Rep. Rep. Rep. Rep. Rep. Rep. Rep.
An Ad-Hoc Committee was consequently set up with the following Members: Farouk M. Lawan, OFR Dr. Ali Babatunde Ahmad Eucharia Azodo Engr. Alphonsus Gerald Irona Umar Abubakar Sade James Abiodun Faleke John Owan Enoh Dr. Abbas Tajudeen Chairman Member “ “ “ “ “ “
SECRETARIAT: Emenalo, Boniface C. Nwanekezie Ezennia
2.1.3. The Ad-Hoc Committee held its inaugural meeting on the 13th day of January, 2012.
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CHAPTER THREE A. METHODOLOGY 3.1. The Ad-Hoc Committee during its inaugural and subsequent meetings established the administrative and operational framework for its investigative mandate including the following: a. Drawing up the timetable for the activities of the Ad-Hoc Committee including dates of Committee meetings and dates for holding Public Hearings b. providing for the procedure at these Meetings and Hearings c. determining the list of persons (individual & corporate) to be invited to appear before the Committee to assist it with the mandate d. classifying the list of persons into the various categories relative to the mandate e. designing the invitation templates including electronic, hard and soft copy options to secure the timely and scheduled appearance before the Ad-Hoc Committee
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f. determining the nature of oral testimony and mode of documentary evidence to be taken, including nature of administration of Oaths and Affirmations as applicable. g. undertaking a forensic examination of the maritime framework under which importation of petroleum products was undertaken, with a view to tracking and authenticating the movement of vessels in international and other waterways, utilizing the professional partnerships and maritime intelligence available at Lloyds List Intelligence of London. h. To investigate the Subsidy Regime, as operated during the period 2009 to 2011 which was the era when the abuse of the subsidy process and the escalation of the costs increased dramatically. Thus all references in the Report are to be deemed to refer to this period, except where otherwise indicated. i. targeting the proceedings towards resolving the following issues, inter alia: 1. 2. 3. 4. What is the volume of daily consumption of Premium Motor Spirit (PMS) or Petrol in Nigeria? How much is the cost of importation per litre of the product? was there any subsidy paid by the Federal Government and how much was it? was the bidding process for the importation contract open, transparent and in compliance with Public Procurement Act 2007 and other extant laws? 5. what was the process of this payment and was due process followed?
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6. 7.
was there a cabal associated with the importation and who were the members if any? were there cases of corruption/irregularities associated with the process and or payment of subsidy by the Federal Government and why has the Government failed to address these identified corruption/irregularities?
8. 11. 12. 13.
How much was paid by the Federal Government as subsidy in 2011 and who authorized the payments? How much was appropriated for subsidy and were there extra-budgetary spendings? What is the state of our refineries, how much are their refining capacities? What was the contribution of the 445,000 barrels of crude oil per day to the daily consumption of petroleum products? In the attempt to resolve the above questions, the Committee identified and classified the major stake holders into; 1. The Oil Marketers 2. Government Agencies and Parastatals 3. Professional Bodies and Trade Unions 4. Individuals 5. Key Consultants. Below is the list of those invited and their appearance status:-
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B. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29.
INVITED COMPANIES AND APPEARED. Aiteo Energy Resources Ltd Ontario Oil and Gas Ltd Naticel Petrochemical Ltd A.A. Rano Nig. Ltd Avidor Oil and Gas Company Northwest Petroleum and Gas Company Valviza Petroleum Ltd Owa Oil and Gas Ltd Shorelink Oil and Gas Service Ltd Pon Specialist Ltd Hyden Petroleum Ltd Master Energy Oil and Gas Ltd Oando Oil Conoil Honeywell Oil Folawiyo Oil Pinnacle Oil and Gas Capital Oil Plc Capital Oil and Gas MRS Oil Plc MRS Oil and Gas ADDAX Petroleum NIPCO Plc Sahara Energy S.A. SPOG Petrochemicals Ltd Linetrale Oil Supply and Trading Co. Setana Energy OBAT Oil and Petroleum Ltd Pinnacle Contractors Ltd 20
30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 47. 48. 49. 50. 51. 53. 54. 55. 56. 57. 58. 59. 60.
Anosyke Group of Co. Ltd Total Nig. Plc Rahamaniyya Group Triquest Energy Ltd SEDEC Energy Ltd A-Z Products Ltd Imad Oil and Gas Ltd Knightsbridge Ltd Menol Oil and Gas Ltd Nasaman Oil and Service Ltd Matrix Energy Ltd Lloyds Oil Nig. Ltd Alminnur Resources Ltd MOB Integrated Services Shield Petroleum Co. Nig. Ltd Taurus Oil and Gas Ltd Nadabo Energy Ltd First Deepwater Discovery Ltd Venro Energy Ltd Dee Jones Petroleum Valcore Energy Ltd Integrated Oil and Gas Ltd Integrated Resources Brittania-U Nig. Ltd Tonique Oil Services Ltd Dozzy Oil Ltd Sifax Oil and Gas Co. EternaPlc Bovas and Co. Ltd Eurafric Oil and Coastal Services Ltd 21
61. 62. 63. 64. 65. 66. 67. 68. 69. 70. 71. 72. 73. 74. 75. 76. 77. 78. 79. 80. 81. 82. 83. 84. 85. 86. 87. 88. 89. 90.
Sea Petroleum and Gas Top Oil and Gas Ascon Oil Company Ltd Swift Oil Ltd Majope Investments Ltd Avant Garde Energy Ltd Sirius Energy Service Ltd Duport Marine Ltd Lumen Skies Ltd Origin Oil and Gas Ltd ABSAF Petroleum and Co. Ltd Downstream Energy Source Ltd Channel Oil and Petroleum Source Ltd Brila Energy Ltd CEOTI Ltd Sulphur Streams Ltd Geacan Energy Ltd A.S.B. Investment Company Fradro International Ltd Lubcon Ltd Forte Oil Plc Phoneix Oil Company Ltd Eco-Regen Ltd Lingo Oil and Gas Company Ltd Ocean Energy Trading and Service Ltd Ryden Oil Ltd Anajul Nig. Ltd Crystal Dynamic Energy Ltd IPMAN Investments Arcon Oil Ltd 22
91. 92. 93. B.1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. B.2 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17.
AMG Petroenergy Ltd Yanaty Petrochemicals Nigeria Limited Xavier Energy Nigeria Limited COMPANIES THAT SUBMITTED PAPERS BUT DID NOT APPEAR Maizube Petroleum Ltd Mercuria Global Energy Momats Oil and Gas Nupeng Ventures Rainoil Ltd COMPANIES INVITED BUT DID NOT APPEAR AND DID NOT SUBMIT DOCUMENTS Aquitane Oil Bodej Investment Cadees Oil and Gas Carnival Ltd Colbert Energy Crusteam Nigeria Delmar Petroleum Co. Fargo International Ltd/Fargo Petrol and Gas Ltd Grand Pet. And Chemicals Ice Energy Index Petroleum Africa Mezcor S.A. Meglams Oil and Gas Mut-Hass Petroleum Ltd Nepal Oil and Gas Service Oilbath Nigeria Oil Force Nigeria 23
18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 39. 40. 41. 42. 43. 44. 45.
Practoil Ronad Oil and Gas West Africa Ltd PVN Capital Ltd Supreme and Mitchells Oil Ltd, Port Harcourt Tahil and Tahil (Nig.) Ltd Techno Oil Ltd Tempo Energy Nig. Ltd Tridax Oil and Gas Ltd Vitcam Services Ltd Viva Energy Ltd Zalex Energy Resource Ltd Xalom Petroleum Ltd July Seventh Oil Ltd Zamson Nig. Ltd Somerset Energy Services Mobil Oil Nigeria AX Energy Ltd CAH Resources Association Ltd Crust Energy Ltd Fresh Synergy Ltd Ibafon Oil Ltd Lottoj Oil & Gas Ltd Oakfield Synergy Network Ltd Petro Trade Energy Ltd Prudent Energy & Service Ltd Rocky Energy Ltd Fatgbems Petro Company Ltd
33. Stonebridge Oil Ltd
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C. 1. 2. 3. 4. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 19. 20. 21. 22. C.1 1. 2. 3.
INVITED FEDERAL GOVERNMENT AGENCIES Hon. Minister of Petroleum Resources Hon. Minister of Finance and coordinating Minister of the Economy Hon. Minister of State, Finance Attorney General of the Federation Accountant General of the Federation Director-General, Budget Office Chairman, Federal Inland Revenue Service Corps Marshall, Federal Road Safety Commission Chairman & CEO, Duke Oil MD, Hyson Oil Limited Group Managing Director, NNPC Director, DPR Executive Secretary, PPPRA Executive Secretary, Petroleum Equalization Fund Management Board Governor, Central Bank of Nigeria, CBN Managing Director, Nigeria Maritime Administration and Safety Agency (NIMASA) Managing Director, Pipeline Products Marketing Company (PPMC) Managing Director, Nigeria Ports Authority, NPA The Chief of Naval Staff Nigeria Customs Service NEITI Revenue Mobilisation, Allocation and Fiscal Commission GOVERNMENT AGENCIES INVITED BUT NEITHER APPEARED NOR SUBMITTED ANY DOCUMENT Port Harcourt Refining Company Kaduna Refining Company Warri Refining Company 25
C.2 1. 2. D. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. D.1 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT CONSULTANTS THAT APPEARED BEFORE THE COMMITTEE Managing Partner, OlusolaAdekanola& Co Akintola Williams, Deloitte. INVITED ORGANIZED/PROFESSIONAL GROUPS THAT APPEARED AND MADE PRESENTATIONS. Nigeria Labour Congress, NLC Trade Union Congress, TUC Independent Petroleum Marketer Association of Nigeria (IPMAN) Petroleum and Natural Gas Senior Staff Association of Nigeria (PENGASSAN) Indigenous Ship Owners’ Association of Nigeria (ISAN) Association of Mega Filling Station Owners of Nigeria Depot and Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria (DAPMAN) Jetties & Petroleum Tank Farms Owners of Nigeria (JEPTFON) INDIVIDUALS INVITED THAT APPEARED OR MADE SUBMISSIONS BEFORE THE COMMITTEE. Dr. Kalu Idika Kalu Engr. Jackson Gaius-Obaseki, former GMD, NNPC Barr. Femi Falana Alh. Umar Dembo (Former Minister of State, Petroleum Resources) Barr. OlisaAgbakoba, SAN Prof. Tam David-West Engr. Goody Egbuji Sen. Dr. Ahmadu Ali, fss, CON, GCON Mr. AbiodunJimohIbikunle 26
E. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.
COMPANIES THAT APPEARED BUT WERE NOT DIRECTLY INVOLVED IN THE SUBSIDY REGIME. Televaras Oil Ltd Trafigura S.A Vitol International Hyson Oil Ltd Zenon Oil
3.2.
The Ad-Hoc Committee held Public Hearings from 16th of January, 2012 to 9th of February, 2012, taking sworn testimonies from 130 witnesses, receiving information from several volunteers, and receiving in evidence over 3,000 volumes of documents.
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CHAPTER FOUR 4. 1. EXISTING SUBSIDY REGIME What is generally known as petroleum subsidy is actually paid from the Petroleum Support Fund (PSF). This PSF is administered by the PPPRA under Published Guidelines which came into effect in January, 2006. A. i. The Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) is to among other things: serve as a pool of fund provided in the budget and contributed to by the three tiers of government (Local Government Areas, States and Federal Government) to stabilize the domestic prices of petroleum products against the volatility in the international crude and products prices. ii. to be a supplementation with the accruals during the period of overrecovery; (over recovery here refers to the period at which the Petroleum Products Price Regulatory Agency, (PPPRA) recommended ex-depot price is higher than the landing cost of petroleum products). 3. The Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) guidelines are aimed at ensuring efficiency and prudence in the importation, distribution, marketing and availability of petroleum products to Nigerians at Government regulated prices. 4. These PSF guidelines are classified into Principles, Responsibilities of Stake holders/Operators and Eligibility for drawing from the Fund:
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B. 1.
PRINCIPLES OF THE PETROLEUM SUBSIDY FUND. Under-recovery shall apply when the Landing Cost of products based on import parity principle is in excess of the approved Petroleum Products Pricing Regulatory Agency, PPPRA ex-depot price for the product. deducting In the case of the NNPC, the subsidy shall be computed by the ex-depot price, the Petroleum Equalization Fund
Management Fund (PEF(MB) Allowance, and the PPPRA Administrative charge from the Landing Cost. 2. Over-recovery, which implies payment from marketers into the Fund shall apply when the Landing Cost of the product based on import parity principle is below the approved ex-depot price for the product. 3. The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) shall be the custodian of the Fund, while the PPPRA shall be vested with the authority to administer the Fund as spelt out in the Guidelines. 4. 5. Claims from/payment into the Fund shall be based on the duly verified shore tank volumes. PPPRA shall determine the volume required for imports based on national demand/supply gap and taking cognizance of local production in line with its statutory mandate.
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6.
The PPPRA shall constantly liaise with the Oil Trading/Marketing Companies and other relevant Stakeholders/Operators for the purpose of data collection, verification, certification and updating of the downstream information Data Bank.
7.
(i)
All payments relating to over/under recovery shall be made through
the Fund’s account domiciled in the CBN as approved by the Federal Ministry of Finance. ii. The PPPRA shall be responsible for compilation and verification of import documents and computation of over-recovery/underrecovery due to each Marketer within the prescribed time-frame in the Service Level Agreement as contained in Appendix I of the Guidelines and submission of the same to the Honourable Minister of Finance. iii. The Federal Ministry of Finance, through the Office of the DirectorGeneral, Budget and the Office of the Accountant General of the Federation (OAGF) shall be responsible for auditing, fund-sourcing and crediting the accounts of Marketers in line with the Government e-payment policy. 8. i. All claims from/payment into the Fund must conform to the objectives of the PSF.
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ii.
Payment to Marketers under the PSF Scheme shall be net of the applicable PET(M)B Bridging Allowance and the PPPRA Administrative charge and such deductions shall be paid directly to the respective accounts of each of the two organizations by the Office of the Accountant General of the Federation.
9.
Submission of PSF claims closes on the 20th of every month. All claims received after the 20th of the month shall be treated in the next batch for the successive month.
10.
On receipt of verified documents from the Operators, payment shall
be due not later than 45 days. C. RESPONSIBILITIES OF STAKEHOLDERS/OPERATORS The PSF guidelines have provided for the roles which the various stakeholders in the downstream petroleum sectors are to play in order to actualize the efficient implementation of the PSF, as follows: 1. 1. 2. 3. Department of Petroleum Resources (DPR) is to: Issue import permits OMC/TC which is valid for one year from the date of issue. Verification and certification of the quantity of petroleum products imported/supplied by the Marketers Analysis of the quality specification of the products
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4. 5. 6.
Monitoring of the products supply and distribution chain from the jetties to depots and to the retail outlets. Enforcement of the prices set by the Government Provide the PPPRA with necessary information and data relating to products procurement, supply and distribution (both import and local productions).
7.
Collaborate with the PPPRA and PEF(M)B on intelligence monitoring to check malpractices.
2. 1. 2. 3.
Independent Inspectors were to carry out the following functions: Measurement and certification of the quantity imported (both on the vessel and in the shore tank at the jetty) – Products ullaging Certification of the quality specification of the products Ascertain the quantity of bunker fuel in the vessel to avoid adulteration and volume distortions.
3. 1.
Federal Ministry of Finance (FMF)/ Office of the Accountant General of the Federation are involved in the PSF as follows: Confirmation of the quantity of petroleum products imported by a marketer and delivered at the jetty and into the shore tank. (FMF appointed Audit Consultants Akintola Williams Deloitte and Olusola Adekanola and Co. to assist in this respect).
2.
Processing and approval of payment due to the Marketers
32
3.
Issuing of Payment Mandate through the Office of the Accountant General of the Federation to the Central Bank of Nigeria.
4.
Federal Ministry of Finance Audit Consultants were appointed by the Ministry to assist with its responsibilities under PSF scheme by undertaking the followings:
1. 2. 3.
Witness and confirm the quantity imported by the Marketer at the jetties and shore tanks. Participate in products ullaging Provide products statistics (supply & distribution) from jetties to depots and to the retail outlets.
5.
Petroleum Products Pricing Regulatory Authority (PPPRA) shall perform the following responsibilities in line with its mandate under the PSF scheme:
1.
Plan and programme the receipt and distribution of petroleum products to ensure uninterrupted products availability in the country based on determined petroleum products supply gaps.
2.
Deploy PPPRA staff to monitor and verify data on imported products reception and distribution at the jetties, refineries and depots nationwide.
3.
Demand from refineries, monthly production volume on products basis and from the Operators, data on products supply and distribution.
33
4. 5. 6.
Maintain a reliable databank on the activities of the Fund and the industry. Collaborate with DPR on adherence to products specification and HSE standards. Collaborate with PEF(M)B and other Stakeholders on products movements to ensure efficient products supply and distribution to every part of the country.
7. 8.
Collaborate with CBN/FMF on data exchange, FOREX allocation and reconciliation. Embark on wide publicity and enlightenment programmes to educate Stakeholders and the public at large on the benefits of the initiative (i.e, the Petroleum Support Fund).
9.
Collaborate with the PEF(M)B and DPR on intelligence monitoring to check malpractices and apply appropriate sanctions to the defaulters.
10. 11. 12.
Perform
conciliatory
and
mediatory
roles
among
Stakeholders/Operators. Set Regulations on holding of petroleum stocks and ensure compliance. Ensure Security of Supply: This is achieved by collaborating with the NNPC and other Marketers to release their reserved stocks into the market in time of emergencies and supply gaps arising from the inability of the Marketers in fulfilling their obligation on products procurement and shortfall in refinery production.
34
13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18.
From time to time review the PSF Guidelines in line with its statutory mandate. Monitoring of products evacuation from the depots to the retail outlets covering bridging and local delivery Monitoring of prices at the depot and retail outlets levels Determination of appropriate price build-up subject to approval by the Government Determination of industry operators margins subject to Government approvals Determination of appropriate under and over recoveries in line with the approved Ex-depot prices and established Landing Costs.
6. 1.
Nigerian Navy Issuance of clearance for vessels carrying imported products to enter the Nigerian waters.
7. 1.
Nigerian Customs Service Issuance of clearance to discharge or Authority to unload petroleum products with the quantities stated.
8. 1.
Nigerian Port Authority (NPA) Issuance of clearance to allow the vessel to berth at the Jetty after necessary payment (Port dues are based on the size of ships and volume of products as stated in the Bill of Lading).
2.
Vessel’s berth scheduling
35
9. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 10.
Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN): regulatory authority shall:
The CBN as the financial
be the custodian of the PSF Fund Issue Statement of Account of the Fund to the PPPRA on monthly basis. Issue FOREX to importers subject to the prevailing import procedures/guidelines of CBN. Manage the idle funds for security and maximum returns. Render to the PPPRA monthly disbursement of FOREX to petroleum products importers. Render to the PPPRA on monthly basis, the actual FOREX rates debited the Marketers’ account by the commercial banks. Confirmation of the payment to the importers from the PSF Debt Management Office, (DMO): Arising from problems
encountered by delays in payment to importers of Petroleum Products, the payment system was improved through the introduction of the use of the Sovereign Debt Note (SDN) in the year 2010 administered by the DMO whose responsibility became as follows: 1. Ensure the issuance of the Sovereign Debt Note (SDN) to importers for the value of under-recovery approved by the PPPRA 2. Guarantee importers’ payment within 45 days of the issuance of the SDN
36
11. Petroleum Equalization Fund Management Board (PEF(M)B) shall: 1. 2. Provide the PPPRA with regular data on products distribution (local and bridging). Shall ensure bridged products are received and acknowledged at invoiced destinations and report defaulting Operators to the PPPRA for appropriate action. 3. Collaborate with the PPPRA and DPR on intelligence monitoring to check malpractices and report incidence to the PPPRA for necessary action. 12. INDEPENDENT CARGO INSPECTORS: These were introduced in December, 2011 to undertake the following: 1. Ascertain arrival volumes, discharges and truck-outs from jetties and depots (The names of independent cargo inspectors include Saybolt, GMO, Inspectorate, SGS, Vibrant, and, Intertek) 2. Establish the veracity of imports through Family Tree
13. Facilities/Depot Owners 1. Ascertain the volume discharged into the tanks and monitor their distribution through the closing and opening inventory stocks as well as appropriate means of ullaging.
37
14. Oil Marketing/Trading Companies (OMC‟s/TC‟s) shall: 1. 2. Import, supply and distribute petroleum products nationwide. Comply with rules and regulations set by the PPPRA concerning products scheduling, shipment to jetties, products transportation through 3. 4. 5. pipeline network/trucks/rail to storage depots and evacuation to retail outlets. Submit on a monthly basis, data on products supply and distribution. Allow PPPRA Operatives to monitor products movements from jetties to the depots and from depots to retail outlets. Furnish PPPRA with three (3) spiral-bound copies of the import documents sequentially arranged as prescribed in the Checklist contained in Appendix II of the PSF Guidelines.
The detailed breakdown of the operators (OMC/TC) and their categorization in terms of storage capabilities are listed in subsequent section of this report for Premium Motor Spirit (PMS).
15(a) In accordance with PSF Guidelines the responsibilities of
stakeholders and their roles have already been indicated per above. (b) Under the PSF Scheme the PPPRA has a pricing template as follows:
38
PPPRA PRICING TEMPLATE (PRICE BUILD-UP COMPONENTS): 1. Product Cost ($/MT) This is the monthly moving average cost of refined petroleum products (PMS, AGO, DPK) as quoted on **PlattOilgram. The reference spot market is North West Europe (NWE) and the transaction is CIF Cargoes (Cost, Insurance & Freight) basis for AGO and DPK, FOB Barges (Free on Board) basis for PMS. The NWE market is adopted because of its liquidity and transparency. Platt is the leading global provider of energy and metals information, and the world’s foremost source of price assessments in the physical energy markets. Its Oilgram Price Reports is the daily report that covers markets changes, market fundamental and factors driving prices. 2. Conversion Rate The conversion rate from Metric Tons to Litres based on the Specific Gravity of AGO is 1164; DPK is 1232 and PMS is 1341. The conversion factors may be altered depending on the Specific Gravity of the products approved by the DPR. 3. Exchange Rate This is the average exchange rate of Naira to a Dollar as quoted by Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) on daily basis. 4. Freight This is the average clean tanker freight rate (World Scale (WS) 100) as quoted on Platts. It is the Cost of transporting 30, 000mt (30kt) of
39
product from NWE reference market to West Africa (WAF) coast (Lagos/Bonny offshore). 5. Lightering Expenses Ship-to-Ship (Transshipments)/Local Freight charge is the cost incurred on the trans -shipment of imported petroleum products from the Mother Vessel into Daughter Vessel to allow for the onward movement of the product into the Jetty. This charge includes receipt losses of 0.3% in the process of products movement from the high sea to the Jetty and then to the depot and the NIMASA inspection charge. Also included in the Lightering Expenses is the Shuttle vessel’s Chattering Rate from Offshore Lagos/Bonny to the different jetties in the country. Transshipment (STS) process is as a result of peculiar draught situation and inadequate berthing facilities at major Ports/Jetties – Apapa, Calabar and Port Harcourt. It should be noted that vessels discharging at different Jetties undergo STS at the offshore either Lagos or Bonny except Folawiyo and Atlas Cove Jetties. 6. Nigeria Port Authority (NPA) Charge It is the cargo dues (harbor handling charge) charged by the NPA for use of Port facilities. The charge includes VAT and Agency expenses. The NPA charge is based on the quantity of products and the length of the ship – Length Overall (LOA)
40
7. Financing It refers to stock finance (cost of fund) for the imported product. It includes the cargo financing based on the International London Inter bank Offered Rates (LIBOR) rates covering 21 days and the Nigerian Inter bank Offered Rate (NIBOR) for 9 days. The financing of the component of subsidy claims being paid through the PSF covering 45 days is also added based on the prevailing NIBOR rates. The LIBOR is normally between 30 – 90 days e.g. 30-day, 60-day and 90-day LIBOR. 8. Jetty Depot Thru. Put This is the tariff paid for use of facilities at the Jetty by the Marketers to move products to the storage depots. 9. Pipeline Charge Product Pipeline Margin is for pipeline charges. The Charge is based on N.50/Litre fixed charge for pipeline length not less than 10km and variable charge subject to a maximum charge of N1.50 for 1000 km pipeline length (only NNPC is entitled to claim the charge when product is
moved between Atlas Cove and Mosimi, Satellite town, Ibadan).
10. Storage charge Storage Margin is for depot operations covering storage charges and other services rendered by the depot owners
41
11. Landing Cost It is the cost of imported products delivered into the Jetty depots. It is made up of components highlighted above (1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 10). 12. Distribution Margins These include Retailers, Dealers, Transporters margins, Bridging fund and Administrative charge as approved by the Government. 13. Taxes These include highway maintenance, government, import and fuel taxes. It has the overall objective of revenue generation, social infrastructure investment. It also servicing and efficient fuel usage. Presently importation of PMS under the PFS Scheme attracts zero taxes. 14. Retail Price This is the expected pump price of petroleum products at retail outlets. It is made up of landing cost of imported product plus reasonable distribution margins.
NOTE:
Pump prices of the products are expected to be uniform because of equalization and bridging claims paid by the Petroleum Equalization Fund.
42
16.
ELIGIBILITY FOR DRAWING FROM THE PFS FUND Oil Marketing/Trading Companies are expected to meet the Rules and Regulations set by the PPPRA on the management/administration of the Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) as follows:
1.
Applicant must be an Oil Marketing/Trading Company registered in Nigeria with the Corporate Affairs Commission (CAC) to conduct petroleum products business.
2. i.
Beneficiary/Claimant must possess the following: Proof of Ownership or a valid through-put agreement of storage facility with a minimum of 5,000 metric tons for the particular product. Ownership of retail stations is an added advantage.
ii. 3. 4. 5. 6.
Possession of a valid DPR import permit. Having satisfied 1 and 2 above, an applicant shall submit application for participation in the Scheme to the PPPRA. Successful applicants shall sign an Agreement with the PPPRA to become a participant under the Scheme. Approval to import shall be expressly conveyed by the PPPRA to the Participant Importer. Beneficiary/Claimant must notify PPPRA within a minimum of three (3) days ahead of cargo arrival in the country and furnish the PPPRA with the relevant documents including copies of invoices, bills of lading, source of funding and expected date of arrival for documentation.
43
7. 8. 9.
The product loading and arrival time must be within a maximum of 30 days and must meet products specification by the DPR. All approvals for importation are valid for a maximum of three months based on the current PPPRA quarterly importation plan. Deliveries must be made to depot locations approved by the DPR and witnessed by PPPRA Operatives, External Auditors and the Industry Consultant (Independent Inspectors).
10. 11.
All documents forwarded to the PPPRA must contain shore tank report duly signed by PPPRA Representatives at discharge locations. (i) All out-turn deliveries to approved locations must be through invoices at approved ex-depot prices. ii. Marketers shall render out-turn delivery returns which must contain the invoiced ex-depot prices and volumes to the PPPRA as part of conditions for continued participation in the Scheme.
17. The Checklist expected from the importers includes the following: 1. 2. Original PPPRA Import permit Evidence from the Bank showing the amount paid on the Transaction and quantity verifiable with Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN). 3. 4. 5. Letter of Credit for the Transaction/Bill of collection (bill of exchange) Letter of affirmation of discharge from the depot. A final Invoice relating to the Transaction
44
6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22. 23. 24. 25. 26. 27. 28.
Witness Page PPPRA approval page Guarantee page Notification of nomination of vessel DPR import permit Maritime Insurance Form M Proforma invoice Bill of Lading Certificate of origin Cargo Manifest Ullage Report (port of origin) Certificate of quantity (load port) Certificate of quality (load port) Notice of readiness (load port) Vessel ullage report on arrival before discharge to shuttle vessel Vessel ullage report after discharge (ROB) of Mother vessel Vessel survey report after loading (mother vessel & shuttle vessels (if any) Vessel survey report before discharge (mother vessel and shuttle vessels (if any) Time log of discharge Vessel experience factor Tank inspection report Bunker survey report
45
29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. 18
Cargo pumping log Letter of protest (if any) Notice of readiness at discharge port Transfer of Certificate Certificate of quantity at discharge port Certificate of quality at discharge port Shore tank report DPR Vessel report Nigeria Customs Service Clearance Nigeria Navy Clearance INTRODUCTION OF SOVEREIGN DEBT NOTE (SDN) AS THE MEDIUM FOR PAYMENT UNDER THE PSF SCHEME RE: PROCEDURES AND MODALITIES (ADOPTED BY IMMEDIATE PAST BOARD OF PPPRA)
18.1 In order to ease the delay experienced in the subsidy settlement and the attendant negative effects such as foreign exchange differentials/interest rates demand by Marketers, the government after consultation with Stakeholders approved the alternative subsidy settlement approach in March, 2010 18.2 The Federal Government approved the utilization of Sovereign Debt Instruments (SDIs) as alternative import financing instruments to enhance private sector participation in Products Supply and
46
Distribution.
This is to guarantee timely payment of subsidy,
thereby enabling Marketers to access financing support from banks. 18.3 The required modalities for implementation of the initiative was worked out in conjunction with the Federal Ministry of Finance, Budget Office of the Federation, Central Bank of Nigeria, Office of the Accountant General of the Federation, Debt Management Office, Marketers Association and PPPRA. products in the system. 18.4 The Sovereign Debt Note (SDN), as backed by government, is a promissory note introduced to ensure timely settlement of the subsidy liabilities to participants under the Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) scheme. The government guarantees prompt settlement of legitimate petroleum product supply transactions on approved volumes within the 45-days window by means of the Sovereign Debt Note (SDN) and Sovereign Debt Statement (SDS). 18.5 SUMMARY OF THE POST-SDN SUBSIDY PROCESS: The PSF payment has always been based strictly on the Federal Government appointed Auditors Report. The aim is to continually ensure the transparency of payments made under the Scheme. At the beginning and up till February, 2010, payments to eligible The ultimate objective of government is the attainment of seamless supply of petroleum
47
Marketers were effected post-audit of the PPPRA recommended subsidy sum to the Federal Ministry of Finance. However, with the introduction of this alternative payment approach (Sovereign Debt Note) by the Government to minimize the turnaround processing time for subsidy payment, it became compelling to settle subsidy claims pre-audit. occasionally leaves variations between the The mechanism PPPRA subsidy
recommendations and the approved Federal Government appointed Auditor‟s report. The variations are resolved by issuance of Debit Note against any Marketer found to have claimed in excess of the Auditors recommended subsidy since the Agency ensures that the Government is fully indemnified against overpayment to any Marketer by the terms of the initial Legal Agreement. 18.6 The steps can be summarized as follows: a. b. c. Notification to import by the Marketers. Registration by the Marketer to participate in the PSF Scheme. Approval to import given by the PPPRA based on the level of products availability and other relevant and critical factors deemed appropriate by the Agency. d. Witnessing and confirmation of the discharge of the imported cargo by PPPRA staff, Federal Ministry of Finance Appointed Auditors
48
(Akintola Williams Deloitte and Olusola Adekanlola and Co.), DPR, the independent inspectors and the Nigerian Navy at the jetties. e. Processing of the import documents and determination of under or over recovery (as applicable) by the PPPRA on the basis of volume endorsed by the DPR and Independent Inspectors and the published Platt product prices for the period of the imports. f. g. Submission of the verified documents and subsidy claims to the Federal Ministry of Finance (FMF) by PPPRA. Submission of documents of subsidy claims to the FMF Appointed Auditor (Akintola Williams Deloitte and Olusola Adekanlola and Co.) by the FMF through the Budget Office of the Federation (BOF). h. i. j. k. l. m. n. Sovereign Debt Statement is issued to Marketers by PPPRA based on verified volumes. Debt Management Office (DMO) prepares Sovereign Debt Note and notifies CBN and PPPRA. Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) redeems matured obligations to Marketers within 45 days. Federal Ministry of Finance (FMF) sources funds and coordinates subsidy settlement Verification/Auditing of Marketer’s subsidy claims by FMF Auditors (Akintola Williams Deloitte and Olusola Adekanlola and Co.) Submission of Audited Report on subsidy claims to the FMF by the Auditors (Akintola Williams Deloitte and Olusola Adekanlola and Co.) FMF reconciles payments to Marketers against the Auditor’s report and advices PPPRA appropriately.
49
NOTE: The immediate past Board of the PPPRA led by Sen. Ahmadu Ali, FSS, CON, GCON, increased the number of participants in the Scheme from 49 to over 128. This increase, no doubt brought along with it some of the challenges which the Authority never anticipated.
50
CHAPTER FIVE 5. A. ASSOCIATED INFRASTRUCTURES REFINERIES
1.1 Nigeria has the following Refineries and their installed capacities are indicated beside each one as follows: INSTALLED CAPACITY OF DOMESTIC REFINERIES (BPSD) INSTALLED CAPACITY OPERATORS LOCATION (BARRELS) NNPC NNPC NNPC NNPC WARRI PORT HARCOUT (OLD) PORT HARCOUT (NEW) KADUNA 125,000 MT 60,000 MT 150,000 MT 110,000 MT 1,000 MT 446,000 MT
NDPR OGBELE TOTAL INSTALLED DOMESTIC CAPACITY
51
B. 2.1
TANK FARMS Listed below, are the detailed breakdown of the operators and their categorization in terms of storage capabilities for Premium Motor Spirit (PMS). DEPOT OWNERS AND THEIR PMS STORAGE CAPACITIES.
S/N O
NAME OF COMPANIES
ADDRESS
STORAGE CAPACITIES
1 2 3
A-Z Petroleum Acorn Plc AITEO Energy Resources Ltd
Docyard Road, Apapa – Lagos
Nil
Ibru Yard, Ibafo, Apapa - 6,000,000L Lagos -Abonema -5/7, Warf, Port 95,000MT Road, 210,000 MT Nil Harcourt, Rivers State Dockyard Apapa, Lagos
4 5 6 7
Aquitane Oil and Gas Ltd. Ascon Oil Company Ltd. Avidor Oil and Gas Bovas and Company Ltd
–Ibru Yard, Ibafor, Apapa, Lagos
Ibru Yard, Ibafor, Apapa – 12,700,000L Lagos Abonnema, Whalf Road, 52,551,055 L PH, Rivers State Mosheshe Industrial Area, 10,000,000 L
52
Kirikiri Town, Water Front, Lagos 8 9 Capital Oil and Gas Industries Ibru Jetty Complex, Ibafor 49,618,400L Ltd Cita Bulk Storage Facilities Ltd Lagos State. Port International 10 Cleanserve Integrated Energy Murtala Solutions Limited 11 Conoil PLC Ikeja - Lagos 1. 2. Apapa Murtala – Lagos (23,668,849 L). Mohammed 43,422,766 L Wing, Airport Lagos 3. Reclamation Road, Port Harcourt Rivers State. (19,753,917 L) 4. Nnamdi International Airport, Abuja. 12 Cybernetics Services Ltd. 13 Dee Jones International Along Oghara – Oghareki 6,4000,000 L Road, Oghara, Delta State Petroleum Beachland Estate, Apapa, 13,500,000 L
53
Harcourt Airport, Nil Mohammed
Omagwa,Rivers State Airport, Domestic Wing, Nil
Domestic
Company 14 Delmar Petroleum Company
Lagos. Delmar Jetty, Off Nil Rumuopirikom/Rumuolum eni Road, Iwofe
15
Eco
Aviation
Fuel
Support Murtala - Lagos Dumez Kaduna
Mohammed Nil
Services Sahara) 16
Limited
(Formerly International Airport, Ikeja Luxirious – Road, Park, Nil Abuja Apapa, Nil
Empire Energy Ltd.
Expressway Abuja, Suleja 17 18 Energy Destinations Limited Eres N.V. Nigeria Ltd. Dockyard Lagos Along Apapa – Oshodi Nil Express Way, Ibru Yard, Ibafon, Lagos 19 EternaPlc Ibru Ibafon, Lagos 20 21 22 Eurafric Oil and Coastal Dockyard Lagos Calabar Free Trade Zone, 12,544,000 L Cross River State. Fatgbems International Ltd Kirikiri Lighter terminal II, 12,000,000 L AmuwoOdofin, Lagos.
54
Port Apapa
Complex, 9,630,000 L L.G.A, Apapa, Nil
Road,
Service Limited Ever Oil and Gas Limited
LGA,
23 24 25 26
First Deepwater Discovery Ltd. Ijegun
Waterfront, 7,300,000 L
Satellite Town, Lagos First Nigerian Independent Oil Ibru Yard, Ibafon, Apapa, 17,000,000 L Company Ltd Folawiyo Energy Limited Forte Oil Plc (Former AP) Lagos 27, Creek Road, Apapa, Nil Lagos 2 AP/Conoil Road, Naval Dockyard, Apapa, Lagos (13,500,000 L) 27 Forte Oil Plc Aviation Aviation Terminal Depot, Murtala - Lagos 28 Forte Oil Plc Federal Onne, 29 Fresh Synergy Ltd Light Rivers Terminal, State 13,120,000 L Mohammed 18,500,000 L International Airport, Ikeje
(5,000,000 L) UbioOkpuk/NtanAfia, IkotAbasi LGA, AkwaIbom State. 30 31 Grand Chemicals Gulf Treasures Limited Petroleum and Calabar Free Trade Zone, Nil Cross River State. Along Apapa – Oshodi Express Way, Ibru Yard, 17,800,000 L Ibafon, Lagos 32 Hensmor Nigeria Limited Railway
55
Compound, Nil
Dockyard Road, Apapa 33 34 Hyden Limited Honeywell Oil and Gas Limited Petroleum Company PHCN Compound, IJora, 4,856,883L Apapa, Lagos Imesco Road, (4,600,000L) 35 36 37 38 39 Honeywell Oil and Gas Limited Ibafon Oil FZE Ibafon Oil Limited Kayode Street, Apapa, Lagos (12,295,322 L) Calabar Free Trade Zone, 18,086,000 L Cross River State. Ibru Yard, Ibafon, Apapa, Nil Lagos Nil Ibeto Petrochemical Industries Ibru Yard, Ibafon, Apapa Limited Index Petrolube Africa Limited – Lagos Mosheshe Industrial Area, Kirikiri Town, Water Front, Lagos 40 41 42 43 Integrated Oil and Gas Kings Limited Lister Oils Limited Logistics and Crown Oil and Ibru Yard, Ibafon, Apapa, 52,000,000 L Lagos Gas Calabar Free Trade Zone, 5,000,000 L Cross River State 21 Creek Road, Apapa, 16,000,000 L Lagos Petroleum NnamdiAzikiwe
56
Jetty,
Marine Calabar 16,895,322 L
Nil 3,015,930 L
Nil
Services Limited (Aviation) 44 Lubcon Ltd
International Abuja. Marina Road,
Airport, Calabar, Nil
Cross River State. 45 46 47 48 49 50 Masters Energy Oil and Gas Aker Limited Matrix Energy Mobil Oil Nigeria PLC Mobil Oil Nigeria Motifs Nigeria Ltd. MRS Oil and Gas Base, Oduoha 67,698,000 L
Village, Rivers State Ijalla Village, Warri, Delta 20,000,000 L State Murtala Mohammed Nil International Airport, Ikeja 1, Mobil Road, Apapa, 22,500,000 L Lagos 1, POl Reserve Mando 1,800,800 L Road, Kaduna 2 Tincan Island Port Road, Apapa, (47,000,000L) Lagos 57,170,000 L Mohammed
51
MRS Oil and Gas Company Ltd Murtala (Aviation) Ikeja – Lagos
Airport, Domestic Wing, 7, Alapata Road,
52
MRS. Oil Nigeria PLC
Dockyard, 53 NIPCO Plc Dockyard
57
Apapa,Lagos Road, Apapa, 22,500,000 L
(10,170,000 L)
Lagos 54 Northwest Petroleum and Gas Calabar Free Trade Zone, Cross 55 Northwest Petroleum and Gas River State 47,840,000 L State (21,000,000 L) Calabar Free Trade Zone, Cross 56 OANDO Plc (Aviation) River (26,840,000L NnamdiAzikiwe International, Abuja 57 OANDO Plc (Terminal I) Marine Beach, Apapa Airport,
(16,000,000 L) 58 59 60 61 OANDO Plc (Terminal II) OANDO Plc OANDO Plc OANDO Plc Marine Beach, Apapa Federal Lighter Terminal, Onne, P.H (15,000,000 L) Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja 2, Reclamation Road, Port Harcourt, 62 Obat Oil and Petroleum Rivers State. (35,000,000 L) Beachland Estate, Apapa, 21,600,000 L Lagos
58
66,000,000 L
63
Oilforce Nig. Ltd
1
Capital
Oil
Close, Jetty 7,000,000 L
WestministerIbru State. 64 65 Oryx Fze PETROLEUM PIPELINES AND PRODUCT MARKETING COMPANY 66
Complex, Ibafon, Lagos Calabar Free Trade Zone, 10,600,000 L Cross River State. Nationwide 3,388,210,83 0
Petroleum Warehousing and Federal Ocean Terminal Nil Supplies Limited 67 68 Petrolog Nigeria Ltd Petrostar Nigeria Limited (FOT) Onne, Rivers STate 9, Reclamation Road, Port Nil Harcourt, Rivers State. Aker Harcourt 69 70 Rahamaniyya Oil and Gas Ltd Rainoil Ltd Beachland Estate, Apapa 40,000,000 L – Lagos Along Oghara – 16,500,000L Road, Ajagbodudu 71 Ringardas Nig. Ltd Base Road, 21,600,000 L Port Rumuolumeni,
Oghareki, Delta State. PHCN Power Station, New Ogorode Road, Sapele, 33,000,000 L Delta State.
59
72 73
Sahara Energy Resources Nig. Ibru Yard, IbafonApapa 6,000,000L Ltd Ltd (6,000,000 L) Harcourt 6,000,000 L Airport, Nil 14,000,000 L International Sahara Energy Resources Nig. Port
Omagwa, Rivers State 74 75 76 Sea Petroleum and Gas Shorelink Oil and Gas Spog Petrochemicals Ltd Ibru Yard, Ibafon, Apapa, Lagos Abonnema Waterside, PH Along Apapa –
OshodiExpress Way, Ibru 6,200,000 L Yard, Ibafon Lagos 77 Swift Oil Mosheshe Industrial Area, Kirikiri Town, Water Front, Lagos 78 Techno Oil Ltd Mosheshe Industrial Area, Kirikiri Town, Water Front, 26,840,000 L Lagos 79 80 81 Tempogate Oil and Energy Calabar Free Trade Zone, Company Limited Tonimas Nigeria Ltd Cross River State. (FOT) Onne, Rivers State. Top Oil and Gas Development Aumtco Company Limited Northern Maitama, Abuja.
60
7,847,547 L
12,600,000 L
Federal Ocean Terminal 586,000 L Premises, Nil Bye-pass,
81 82 83 84 85 86
Total Nigeria Plc Total Nigeria Plc Total Nigeria Plc Venture with Oando) Total Nigeria Plc (terminal II) Total Nigeria Plc (Juhi) Total Nigeria Plc (Aviation)
Ibru Yard, IbafonApapa – Lagos (13,647,000 L) Koko Plant, Koko, Delta (Joint Marine Beach, Apapa, 51,160,965 L Lagos (18,885,966 L) 6, Bonny Road, Apapa, Lagos (18,627,999 L) Murtala Mohammed International Airport, Ikeja NnamdiAzikiwe International Abuja Airport, 6,309,136 L Nil
87 88 89
T-Time Petroleum Services Ltd Ibru Yard, Ibadon, Apapa West African Bitumen Wharf, Apapa Emulsion Company Zenon Petroleum Petroleum and and Gas Ibru Jetty, Ibafon, Apapa
Limited (Terminal I) 90 Zenon Gas Ibru Jetty, Ibafon, Apapa 44,000,000 L (44,000,000 L) Limited (Terminal II)
61
C. i.
RETAIL OUTLETS These are the breakdown of Retail Outlets for petroleum products in all the States of the Federation, (a total of 24,226 outlets), namely:
S/N 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
STATE ABIA ABUJA ADAMAWA AKWA-IBOM ANAMBRA BAUCHI BAYELSA BENUE BORNO CROSS RIVER DELTA EBONYI EDO EKITI
62
NOS OF PETROL STATIONS 778 303 390 784 695 385 68 635 913 550 742 190 465 210
15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32
ENUGU GOMBE IMO JIGAWA KADUNA KANO KATSINA KEBBI KOGI KWARA LAGOS NASSARAWA NIGER OGUN ONDO OSUN OYO PLATEAU
63
697 291 867 298 1,126 1,034 442 526 385 827 1,751 348 522 2,207 743 970 1,657 552
33 34 35 36 37
RIVERS SOKOTO TARABA YOBE ZAMFARA
719 337 336 276 207 24,226
The Storage Capacities Of These Petrol Stations are as follows:
STATE ABIA ABUJA ADAMAWA AKWA-IBOM ANAMBRA BAUCHI BAYELSA BENUE BORNO CROSS RIVER DELTA EBONYI
CAPACITY OF PMS (i) litres
CAPACITY OF AGO (ii) litres
CAPACITY OF DPK (iii) litres 24,850,200 10,662,067 12,673,900 24,451,680 20,959,520 8,787,650 1,928,500 12,902,740 28,023,960 17,951,890 23,025,730 5,534,540
62,180,740 29,177,960 32,328,606 12,646,454 25,719,300 13,647,500 49,795,872 25,165,340 53,440,620 26,015,630 18,504,760 10,048,712 4,340,000 1,968,500 25,675,520 14,492,310 53,996,610 30,811,220 40,903,260 49,500,660 11,618,300
64
18,477,850 27,116,170 6,878,380
EDO EKITI ENUGU GOMBE IMO JIGAWA KADUNA KANO KATSINA KEBBI KOGI KWARA LAGOS NASSARAW A NIGER OGUN ONDO OSUN OYO PLATEAU RIVERS SOKOTO TARABA YOBE ZAMFARA
30,856,165 12,556,050 48,573,984 19,933,000 59,901,715 16,373,440 70,759,330 79,580,960 29,049,100 34,305,050 23,171,680 50,284,270 169,807,560 22,785,410 32,581,650 154,337,200 41,730,770 57,487,320 103,064,060 39,437,558 59,842,122 23,148,000 21,308,314 15,557,100 14,212,910 1,658,648,966
17,759,200 6,125,130 26,503,070 10,095,680 30,575,725 10,005,000 39,751,540 38,167,847 15,383,680 17,691,580 12,733,940 27,770,170 71,265,920 12,839,140 19,094,040 85,435,880 19,320,690 30,012,060 53,699,860 19,828,191 28,720,160 11,935,000 12,290,612 9,341,700 6,774,500 849,566,341
14,039,120 5,902,800 20,895,674 9,733,500 26,456,640 9,183,660 36,362,840 34,625,430 13,743,690 17,087,000 11,509,740 24,534,512 61,124,360 11,111,900 17,042,890 76,831,640 19,945,330 29,628,230 50,010,120 17,038,470 26,086,170 11,248,000 10,858,000 8,486,900 6,505,320 761,744,313 3,269,959,620
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D. JETTIES JETTY & RECEIVING DEPOTS
S/N JETTY NAME New Atlas Cove Jetty (NACJ) Single Point Mooring (SPM) JETTY LOCATION LAGOS STATE Apapa Apapa RECEIVING DEPOT
1 2
Atlas Cove Atlas Cove MRS Oil and Gas Plc, Dockyard NipcoPlc ConoilPlc
3
Apapa Jetty [New Oil Jetty (NOJ), Petroleum Wharf Apapa Jetty (PWA), Bulk Oil Petroleum Jetty (BOP)]
Oando Terminal I Oando Terminal II Apapa Total/Oando JV Honeywell Oil and Gas Limited Total Terminal I Mobil Oil Nigeria Plc Aiteo Energy Resources NipcoPlc
4
Apapa Jetty (Waziri)
Eurafric Coastal Services Limited Apapa Hensmor Limited Energy Destinations Limited
66
A-Z Petroleum Products Limited Acorn Plc Eres N. V. Nigeria Limited Total Plc, Ibafon Zenon (Terminal I) Zenon (Terminal II) EternaPlc Ascon Oil Company Limited 5 Ibafon Jetty Ibafon, Apapa Gulf Treasures Limited Sea Petroleum Oil and Gas Ltd Ibafon Oil Limited Ibeto Petrochemicals Aquitane Oil and Gas Limited SPOG Petrochemicals Limited T-Time Petroleum Services Ltd Sahara Energy Resource Ltd Capital Oil & Gas Industries Ltd 6 Capital Jetty Ibafon, Apapa Oil Force Nigeria Limited First Nigerian Independent Oil Company Limited 7 8 Bovas Jetty Dee Jones Jetty Kirikiri, Bovas and Company Limited Apapa Beachland, Dee Jones Petroleum and Gas Limited Apapa 67
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21
Fatgbems Jetty First Deepwater Jetty Folawiyo Jetty Heyden Jetty Index Jetty Integrated Oil Jetty Lister Jetty MRS Jetty Obat Jetty Rahamaniyya Jetty Swift Oil Jetty Techno Oil Jetty Berth 20
Kirikiri, Apapa Ijegun, Apapa Creek Road, Apapa Ijora, Apapa Kirikiri, Apapa Ibafon, Apapa Creek Road, Apapa Tin-Can, Apapa Beachland, Apapa Beachland, Apapa Kirikiri, Apapa Kirikiri, Apapa Apapa
FATGBEMS PETROLEUM COMPANY LTD First Deepwater Discovery Limited Folawiyo Energy Limited Heyden Petroleum Company Ltd Index Petrolube Africa Limited Integrated Oil and Gas Limited Lister Oils Limited MRS Oil & Gas Company Ltd Obat Oil and Petroleum Limited Rahamaniyya Oil and Gas Limited Swift Oil Limited TECHNO OIL LTD
WEST AFRICAN BITUMEN EMULSION COMPANY RIVERS STATE OandoPlc Onne Forte Oil Plc (Aviation) Petroleum Warehousing Tonimas Sea Petroleum Oil and Gas Ltd
22
Federal Ocean Terminal (FOT) Jetty
23
Federal Lighter Terminal (FLT) Jetty
Onne
68
ConoilPlc 24 Macobar Jetty Reclamation Road, Port Harcourt OandoPlc Petrolog Nigeria Ltd Avidor Oil and Gas Limited Delmar Petroleum Company Limited Masters Energy Oil and Gas Limited Petrostar Nigeria Ltd. SHORELINK OIL AND GAS SERVICES LTD PPMC Depot
25
Avidor Jetty
Abonnema Wharf Road, Port Harcourt Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt
26
Delmar Jetty
27 28
Masters Jetty Petrostar Jetty
Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt Rumuolumeni, Port Harcourt
29
NPA Jetty
Abonnema Wharf Road, Port Harcourt Okrika
30
Refinery Jetty
CROSS RIVER STATE Ever Oil and Gas Limited Grand Petroleum and Chemicals Limited Ibafon Oil FZE Kings Crown Oil and Gas Limited Northwest Petroleum and 69
31
FREE TRADE ZONE JETTY
FZE, CALABAR
Gas Company Limited (Terminal I) Northwest Petroleum and Gas Company Limited (Terminal II) Oryx FZE Tempogate Oil and Energy Company Limited Honeywell Oil and Gas Limited Lubcon Limited PPMC Depot
32 33 34
Honeywell Jetty Lubcon Jetty PPMC Jetty
Marina Road, Calabar Marina Road, Calabar Calabar DELTA STATE
35 36 37 38 39 40
Cybernetics Jetty Matrix Jetty Rainoil Jetty PHCN Jetty Total Jetty Refinery Jetty
Oghara Oghara Oghara Sapele Koko Warri AKWA IBOM STATE
Cybernetics International Services Ltd Matrix Energy Limited RAINOIL LTD RINGARDAS NIG LTD TOTAL NIGERIA PLC PPMC Depot FRESH SYNERGY LTD
41
Fresh Synergy Jetty
AkwaIbom
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E. BARGES APPLICATIONS FOR COASTAL VESSEL LICENSE (BARGES)-2012
NAME DESIRE I DESIRE II DERA I DERA II MARVEL I PRAISE I PRAISE II MNEMOSYNE SAJE 460 HERA KIRI KIRI DEMETRA S215 RHEA HESTIA ENERGY 7001 ENERGY 6503 OWNER RUNNER MARINE LTD RUNNER MARINE LTD RUNNER MARINE LTD RUNNER MARINE LTD RUNNER MARINE LTD RUNNER MARINE LTD RUNNER MARINE LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD SAJE SHIPPING NIGERIA LTD RINGARDAS NIGERIA LTD RINGARDAS NIGERIA LTD 71 CAPACITY (MT) 2,974 4,272 3,808 2,674 4,746 2,432 2,440 4,393 8,926 5,811 6,574 2,191 10,379 4,398 6,574 3,186 2,897 7,835 DEADWEIGHT (MT) 6,016 8,047 6,178 6,279 9,179 5,192 5,688 11,238 24,150 14,948 16,409 16,424 25,932 11,409 16,409
F. PORTS The following are designated Customs Ports in Nigeria, namely: i. i. ii. iii. iv. v. vi. vii. viii. Apapa Port Tin Can Island Port KLT Kirikiri Lighter Terminal Port Harcourt Port Onne Port Sapele Warri Port Koko Port Calabar Port
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CHAPTER SIX OBSERVATIONS AND FINDINGS This Chapter embodies the Committee’s specific findings of facts in respect of the entire subsidy regime. While Section A focuses on findings in respect of government agencies that were the managers or regulators of the process, Section B relates to Marketers, while Section C relates to Marine forensics which relied heavily on findings by Lloyds List Intelligence of London and other maritime experts engaged by the Committee, while Section D relates to forensics on issue of finances. SECTION A: Government Agencies
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS PRICING REGULATORY AUTHORITY (PPPRA)
Findings: 1. Making Payment to Itself: The PSF account was registered in the CBN with the name of PPPRA. After all verifications and final authorisation given to it, CBN effected payment to beneficiary marketers from the account. However, we discovered that some payments were made to PPPRA as ultimate beneficiary. These payments were higher than what should have accrued to the Agency as administrative fee, when weighed against any
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figure of total volume of products discharged within a given period. Thus, in 2009 the Agency approved payment to itself a total sum of N158.470 Billion and N157.894 Billion in 2010. 2. Failure of Monitoring and Verification: Pursuant to its statutory mandate as well as its responsibilities under the PSF Scheme, PPPRA deployed its staff to monitor and verify data on petroleum products reception and distribution at jetties and depots. However, we observed that there was massive collusion between PPPRA staff and some oil marketers as to defeat the envisaged purpose of the monitoring and verification. The Agency is statutorily mandated to “prevent collusion” in the industry, per Section 5 (vi) of the PPPRA mandate under the PSF Guidelines. The Agency witnessed and confirmed all purported discharges of imported cargo and went ahead to process all the documents to the Federal Ministry of Finance (FMF), yet false claims were rampant. Apparently, the Agency never believed in the Regulations it set or, at best, pursued it with nonchalance. Failure of the Agency to achieve the objective of verification resulted in certain marketers taking maximum advantage of the situation. Section B of this Chapter attests to this failure. 3. Proliferation of Marketers: The PPPRA Board Chairman (2009 – 2011) Senator Dr. Ahmadu Ali, GCON, fss, admitted before the Committee that the Board under his Chairmanship decided to proliferate petroleum product
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importers to allegedly break the stranglehold which major marketers had on the system. He also explained that the increase in number was meant to flood the market with the products as a result of the scarcity at that time. This was done without setting a target volume, leading to supply glut in the quarter and throughout the year. The figure then became a baseline which was increased at every successive year. This carte blanche for entrants was the singular most devastating decision of the Agency. The PSF guidelines on prequalification and monitoring completely broke down and the Scheme became an avenue for all forms of patronage. The number of importers increased from an initial figure of 6 in 2006, 36 in 2007, 49 in 2009, and 140 in 2011. A representative example was that of two promoters who allegedly received an e-mail and came in from the USA with a proposal of waste management with NNPC. Instead, the two promoters came together and incorporated Eco-Regen Ltd. on 3rd August 2010 with corporate address as 3rd Floor, UAC Building, Central Business District Wuse Abuja, applied for PPPRA registration on 11thSeptember, got its first allocation of 15,000 mt on 20th January,2011 and was paid One Billion, Nine hundred and eighty-eight million ,one hundred and forty-one thousand, ninety-one naira, ten kobo (N1,988,141,091.10) as subsidy for products NOT supplied. 4. The Committee established that the Executive Secretaries that served between 2009- October 2011 created room for the violation of the
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processes, abuse of the procedure, and fraudulent increase in the number of importers. 5. Deliberate Non-reversal of devastating policy of Marketer
Proliferation: Despite the noticeable non-viability of the policy of proliferation of oil marketers and the unbearable pressure of the ensuing corrupt practices on the economy, the PPPRA never deemed it fit to modify or reconsider its decision for the betterment of the system. 6. Poor record keeping: We observed that the Agency failed to maintain a reliable databank on the activities of the PSF scheme and the industry in general, as required by law. Despite its statutory duty to keep reliable data, there was no single transaction on production, distribution or consumption of petroleum products that was backed up by consistent recorded figures or statistics from any other agency in the industry. 7. Non compliance with guidelines : These relate too qualification of importers: It is believed that some aspects of the revised guidelines (relaxing the requirement of ownership of depot, and retail outlets, with through-put agreements) were inserted to cover anomalies. Even then, the Agency failed to adhere to its set
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guidelines as those that were not oil marketing/trading companies, or those who were yet to register or get allocation, did actually import products and collected subsidy payments. o Importation beyond margin of error of (+/- 10%) on
approved quantity: Despite the high percentage of this margin, the
Agency still accepted and recommended for payment importation of products over and above the acceptable margin. o Abuse of discretion in allocating product quantity: During the period (2009 – October 2011), companies without facilities for storage or distribution sometimes got substantially more allocation than most major oil marketers and other independent marketers with impressive facilities. o Importation without permit: Worse still, some companies without permit in a given quarter imported products and were paid subsidy, in clear violation of the guidelines. o Discharges into un-approved tank farms: We observed 192 occurrences between 2008 and 2011 of marketers discharging PMS to tank farms other than those with whom they had throughput agreement. This makes verification cumbersome and makes nonsense of the pre-qualification requirement that such agreement be entered into and registered with the Agency.
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o However, there were recorded cases where waivers were given by the Agency due to unforeseen logistic issues. Even though these waivers were not to be permitted, they were exceptions and not the rule. o Payment based on discharge: The Committee established that payments were made on imported products based on discharge into shore tanks rather than truck-outs and this facilitated volume manipulation. 8. Reforms of the PSF Scheme: The Committee noted the effort of the new PPPRA Executive Secretary, Mr. Reginald Stanley in initiating reforms to the PSF Scheme especially the sanity introduced in Q1 2012 reflected in the reduction of participants. 9. IMPLICATIONS   The Agency has not provided details of the payments it made to itself, but it was suspected that it kept another undisclosed subsidy account. The figures of N158.470 billion and N157.894 billion have to be fully accounted for by the Office of Accountant-General of the Federation and the PPPRA.   Compromise of the entire PSF Scheme to the extent that round tripping, back loading and other fraudulent practices became the order of the day. Given the multitude of checks enshrined in the PSF scheme as at date, requiring the witnessing and confirmation of every discharge by PPPRA staff, FMF (as represented by Akintola Williams Deloitte and Olusola
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Adekanola and Co.), DPR, the independent surveyors, and the Nigerian Navy, collusion was still very rampant leading to severe abuses. An example of such collusion was the case of a vessel which was said to have brought products for NNPC and was recorded in the documentation of NAVY, NPA, PPPRA, FMF etc but was found out through Llyods List Intelligence (LLI) that the vessel was in South Africa and not in the Nigerian waters as at the date recorded.  The PSF Scheme became a free for all manner of companies engaged in every conceivable business and not necessarily “oil marketing/trading company”, as required by the PSF Guidelines. Before this period, a potential importer must have a history of oil marketing or investment in the industry (such as storage facility of minimum of 5000 MT. and 5 retail outlets).  The instinctive increase in importers (and in the products) did not take into consideration the country’s consumption level and failed to consider that any excess product that was not used attracted subsidy payment, thereby altering the objective of the Scheme to become a limitless drain on the economy.  PPPRA became overwhelmed by the sheer number of marketers (from 6 to 140). Monitoring and evaluating this number of importers was virtually impossible for an inefficient Agency such as PPPRA.  From the Eco-Regen transaction, it was obvious that the reason why it got the allocation in January, 2011 was because the last quarter of 2010 had
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been concluded before their registration with PPPRA. Professionalism and competence was obviously not included in the criteria for qualification by this Board. This was confirmed by the then Executive Secretary Mr. Abiodun Ibikunle who informed the Committee that there was no process, and, in his words: “You walk in and indicate interest and you are considered”.  The Board and successive management and Executive Secretaries of PPPRA during this period (2009 – October, 2011) failed to “maintain constant surveillance over key indices relevant to pricing policy”, as required by the law establishing it, and showed lack of vigilance to the advantage of marketers and possibly themselves, and to the detriment of the nation.  Absence of reliable and readily available information contributed in no small measure to the current quandary in the industry. Pressurising for information produced conflicting figures on the same transaction or omission of vital details. All these either prepared fertile ground or provided adequate cover for perpetrating fraud. A prima facie case of criminal negligence may well be established.  The inability to provide coherent answer for the question on how much litres of fuel were consumed daily attests to this poor record keeping. 10. RECOMMENDATIONS
1. All the payments PPPRA made to itself from the PSF in excess of approved administrative charges (as per the Template), for the sum of NGN N156.455Billion in 2009, and for the sum of NGN 155.824Billion in 2010, should
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be further investigated and officials found culpable prosecuted by the Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies 2. All staff of PPPRA involved in the
a. Processing of Applications by importers, and b. verification, confirmation and payment of imported products by Importers and NNPC should be investigated/prosecuted by the Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies for criminal negligence, collusion and fraud. 3. The Executive Secretaries, who were the accounting officers, and under whose watch these abuses were perpetrated that led to the Government losing billions of naira, should be held liable. We strongly recommend that the Executive Secretaries who served from January 2009 – October 2011 should be investigated and prosecuted by the relevant Anti - Corruption Agencies. This should also include the GM Field Services, ACDO/Supervisor-Ullage Team 1, and ACDO/Supervisor-Ullage Team 2 the same period for their role in the subsidy scheme through the management of the ullaging task. 4. The Chairman of the Board of PPPRA from 2009 – 2011, and the entire Members of the board during the period should be reprimanded for their roles individually/collectively in the absurdities that happened in the management of the subsidy regime. 5. The PPPRA margin of error should not be more than +/-5%. 6.Any importation without permit or where the difference is above approved quota should not be entitled to any amount on the template.
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7. Marketers without storage facilities and retail outlets must be excluded from participating in the Scheme. 8. Henceforth payments for imported products under the PSF Scheme should be based on products truck-outs. 9. All approved shore tanks and storage facilities must have non-return-valves and metering devices installed. 10. It is strongly recommended that PPPRA should publish the PSF accounts on a quarterly basis to ensure transparency and openness of the Scheme. FEDERAL MINISTRY OF FINANCE (FMF) FINDINGS: 1. Acquiescence to direct deductions by NNPC: The Ministry was fully aware of NNPC’s practice of making subsidy payments as a first-line charge before revenue was shared among the three tiers of government. Successive Appropriation Acts have always made provisions specifically to defray the costs associated with cash calls on joint ventures as a first line charge. Thus, direct deductions by NNPC relating to joint venture cash calls are provided for in the budget. This is because Section 7(4)(b) of NNPC Act Cap N123 LFN 2004 provides for defraying of expenses incurred
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in making money for the country. However, under-recovery (payment of subsidy) cannot be said to be “making money for the country” and so is not covered by this Act. Given the effect of direct deductions on all levels of government, none of the Honourable Ministers of Finance or Petroleum Resources or heads of parastatals under them sought authoritative interpretation from the Honourable AttorneyGeneral of the Federation, who denied receiving any such request from any quarters. The direct deductions by the NNPC are a clear breach of Section 162 of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria (as amended). 2. Troubled Budget Management: A core role of the FMF is to manage the budget of the Federal Government and to manage, control and monitor federal revenues and expenditures. With regard to the subsidy scheme that had provision for N245.96 Billion in year 2011, the sum of N2, 587.087 Trillion (as at December 2011, and excluding possible out standings payable in 2012) was actually expended, including the double deductions by NNPC. This is certainly a record that can hardly be rivalled in the history of a warped budget management of any nation anywhere in the world. The explanation of budgetary under-provision “based on an expectation that deregulation would be done in late 2010” as explained by the Director-General
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Budget Office, or “based on assurances that deregulation would take effect in first quarter of 2011”, as explained by the Hon. Minister of Petroleum Resources, was not only contradictory but also an after-thought. The time limitation was not expressed or implied in the Appropriation Act of 2011. Furthermore, the Appropriation Act of 2011 was amended in May of the same year and there was no request from the Executive for increase in the subsidy figures. 3. Outsourcing the Ministry‟s Responsibilities: Apparently due to deficit of faith in ability or integrity of its staff, the FMF outsourced its responsibility of witnessing and confirming imported products to the accounting and audit firms of Akintola Williams Deloitte in 2006, and Olusola Adekanola and Co. in 2011. Staff of the firms appended their signatures on every document submitted by marketers to process their claims. PPPRA testified that the reliance it placed on the signatures was weighty, as it normally forwarded marketers’ claims for payment to FMF once certified by the firms. Reliance on statements of the two firms was foundational, as all other agencies, including the Ministry of Finance, Office of the Accountant-General of the Federation and the CBN, all relied on PPPRA’s certification. Obviously, the FMF also treated confirmation by the two firms as unassailable as it never queried its quarterly audit reports even in the face of rapid and meteoric escalation of subsidy claims. However, we observed that the firms contributed little value to the veracity of the exercise. Indeed during interaction with the Committee, it became
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obvious that the firms had neither adequate knowledge of procedure of measuring products in a vessel before and after discharge nor did they demonstrate professional care expected of their standing in auditing marketers’ claims based on quantity, exchange rate and crude price. This care-free attitude could hardly be explained beyond an interest of participating in a bazaar and collecting N275,000.00 per vessel. Surprisingly, the loophole of non-availability of reliable data on quantity of imported products or any other relevant information could not be salvaged by these firms. There was no evidence that due process was followed in the process of their appointment as Consultants. IMPLICATIONS a. Blanket approval for NNPC to deduct subsidy payments to itself as a first line charge is illegal as there was neither appropriation before the deductions nor supervision on the expenditure. b. The practice of direct deduction without an Act of the National Assembly, however long it has been practised, has no legal foundation. This resulted in various ministries and agencies associated with the payments (FMF, FMPNR, Budget Office, Office of Accountant General of the Federation, CBN, NNPPC, PPPRA) providing conflicting figures on the amount deducted. Depletion of shares of states and local governments due to reduction in distributable pool after uncontrolled deduction by NNPC.
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c. An estimated N2,587.087 Trillion inclusive of N847.942 that was withdrawn by NNPC from the domestic crude account was spent on subsidy in 2011 compared to 245Billion approved in the Appropriation Act of the same year; an increase of well over 900% d. This 900% extra-budgetary expenditure was unconstitutional and was a clear breach of Section 162 of the 1999 Constitution (as amended); and the Federal Ministry of Finance, Director-General Budget Office and Accountant-General of the Federation should be held responsible. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. The services of the accounting firm of Akintola Williams, Deloitte and Olusola Adekanola & Partners should be discontinued with immediate effect for professional incompetence. 2. In view of the above recommendation the two firms should be blacklisted from being engaged by any Federal Ministry, Department or Agency (MDA’s) for a period of three years. 3. All those involved in the Federal Ministry of Finance, Director-General Budget Office, and the Office of the Accountant General of the Federation in the extra budgetary expenditure under the PSF Scheme (2009-2011) should be sanctioned in accordance with the Civil Service Rules and the Code of Conduct Bureau. 4. The National Assembly should enact an Act to criminalise extra budgetary expenditure. 5. The Federal Ministry of Finance should allow the Nigerian Customs
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Service to carry out its statutory functions (as efficiently as possible) on imports of petroleum products.
Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN)
FINDINGS 1. Financial Reporting: CBN discharged its responsibility well under the Scheme and it is evident that its financial reporting was highly commendable. But since it was not directly in charge of deduction at source by NNPC, CBN was unable to offer much reliable assistance on those deductions. 2. CBN Import Documentation Requirements: CBN also raised some alarm publicly on the escalation of the subsidy claim to the consternation of agencies in the petroleum industry. For instance, following one of such alarms raised by the CBN Governor Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi at the National Assembly, the then PPPRA Executive Secretary, Abiodun Ibikunle, in a letter to the CBN Governor referenced A.3/9/125/C.10/1/201, dated December 16, 2010, protested that PPPRA activities “were sadly misrepresented and given so much negative publicity by the media, thereby casting serious doubts on our transparency as a sensitive organ of government.” However, the scale and enormity of the abuses that have become clear in the management of the subsidy scheme justified the CBN Governor’s concerns.
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But what could not be confirmed was whether CBN was aware of the gaping loophole created by one of its requirement on FOREX. The issue here was the role of the CBN in the PSF Scheme relating to import documentation requirements. One of such was that to qualify for FOREX transaction, the applicant or marketer must be an “importer” of petroleum products. This was only possible when the port of loading was outside Nigerian territorial waters. This rational and innocuous rule worked perfectly in every other sector except under the PSF Scheme. To qualify for FOREX payment, Nigerian marketers developed the attitude of instructing their sellers to berth a few nautical miles outside Nigerian territorial waters where ship-to-ship transfers between the seller’s mother vessels and the Nigerian marketer’s shuttle vessels (daughter vessels) were carried out. These STS operations often occurred off-shore Cotonou or Lome, illegally. The operations were illegal because STS could only be carried out in areas so designated by the concerned country. These STS locations were not known to any country, and we established that no port duties or other legal levies were paid to any country. It was a massive illegal international commercial activity, and we were unable to establish the existence of such practice anywhere else in the world. This practice encouraged round tripping as some vessels were making two (impossible) trips in three days between offshore Cotonou/Lome and Lagos. In the Committee’s interaction with the real foreign importers or sellers, they
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initially claimed that they anchored their vessels offshore Cotonou/Lome due to such flimsy excuses as draught level of Nigerian waters or categorising Nigeria as a war zone due to piracy. When it was discovered that these same foreign importers do lift crude oil in Nigeria, we then learnt what appeared to be collusion with Nigerian importers. They then revealed that they were really ready and prepared to berth their vessels in Nigerian territorial waters but, being business people, they played smart to abide by the instructions of their Nigerian buyers. Vitol SA and Trafigura, the two leading foreign importers, said this much. “No responsible seller will flout these regulations”, stated Vitol SA, an importer that made over 250 separate voyages of PMS to 34 different marketers in 2011. However, the same foreign importers, including Vitol SA and Trafigura, discharged all PMS belonging to NNPC/PPMC in Nigerian territorial waters. The machination here is clear: while, for example, Vitol SA and Trafigura discharged their products belonging to NNPC/PPMC inside Nigerian territorial waters, the two companies would only discharge the products off shore Cotonou or Lome for other marketers. This is because NNPC was not affected by the CBN regulation as they deducted their claims of FOREX directly from source, while the other marketers would decline to accept those products off-shore Lagos because they needed to conform, on paper, to the so-called CBN requirement. This unmonitored CBN requirement for oil marketers, manifesting in STS transfers, wrought a great havoc on the PSF Scheme.
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3.
IMPLICATIONS
1. 2. CBN provided more reliable data that assisted the Committee CBN created through its forex policy, avenue for easy falsification of records of quantity of petroleum products discharged. 3. With annual average ship traffic of 4,000 vessels, Nigeria accounts for over 65% in volume and value of the total maritime traffic in West and Central Africa. Thus, the country suffered significant loss of employment and revenue which would otherwise have accrued to agencies of Government such as NPA, NIMASA and businesses in the maritime sector 4. Other relevant agencies that had a role in monitoring and verification of products were denied that opportunity and the associated revenues because those agencies did not have authority beyond Nigerian shores or legally designated areas. 5. This encouraged round tripping as some vessels were making, as it were, two trips in three days between off shore Cotonou/Lome and Lagos. 6. The falsification of Form M and letters of Credit could have been avoided if this policy were not in existence.
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7.
RECOMMENDATION:
CBN should critically examine its policy especially with regards to the PSF scheme in the light of these abuses and review the policy guiding payment for importation of petroleum products. NIGERIA NATIONAL PETROLEUM CORPORATION (NNPC) FINDINGS 1. Inapplicability of Guidelines to NNPC: NNPC is saddled with vital responsibilities in the oil industry. But within the PSF Scheme, it was supposed to be another importer, even though in a class of its own. This was understandably so because the Corporation used to be the sole importer of petroleum products before the PSF Scheme was introduced in 2006 and other private marketers permitted to take part in the importation. For this reason, no one expected NNPC to be subjected to eligibility criteria or those meant for pre-qualification of importers. Apart from eligibility criteria and certain minor privileges, it was thought that the Corporation should be subjected to the same rules and processes, meant to achieve transparency and accountability, as other importers. However, we found that there was a tradition of exemption for NNPC from application of the PSF Guidelines. In most instances, all other regulatory, approving or paying agencies accepted whatever figure the Corporation reported back after conclusion of transactions. Vessels
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carrying its cargos were not subjected to the apparently stringent (even though unviable) inter-agency verification exercise. Then, without auditing or verification of quantity claimed by NNPC, the Corporation paid itself by deducting at source, whatever amount it claimed the import amounted to (from the general funds it made for the Nation from other activities in the sector), before remitting the remainder to the Federation Account. Thus, NNPC acted as importer, marketer, claimant, payer and payee. Simply, NNPC was not accountable to anybody or authority. 2. Payment of Subsidy on Kerosene Contrary to Presidential Directive: In June 2009, there was a Presidential Directive by late President Umaru Musa Yar’adua removing kerosene from the subsidy regime, connoting that government would no longer pay subsidy on the product. This directive was echoed in several official documents, including a letter signed by the Principal Secretary to the President, Mr. David Edevbie, with reference number SH/PSP/24/A/819 and dated 17th June, 2009 and addressed to the Honourable Minister of Petroleum Resources. It conveyed the Presidential Directive and required the Honourable Minister to “Eliminate existing subsidy on the consumption of kerosene, taking into account that subsidy payments by Government on Kerosene do not reach the intended beneficiaries.”
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Despite the clear Directive, we established that NNPC continued to pressurise officials of other agencies, especially the PPPRA, to process and pay subsidy on the product which, unlike PMS, was hardly available at the assumed controlled price in the open market. In a series of communications to NNPC, the then Executive Secretary of PPPRA, Mr. Abiodun Ibikunle, stood his ground against authorising the payment. One of such was a letter referenced: A.4/4/229/C.33/V/864, dated 30th September, 2009 and sent to GED Finance and Administration of NNPC. The letter, signed by Mr. Ibikunle and acknowledged by NNPC, stated in part: “2. We wish to inform the GED (F & A) that there is a Presidential directive that there will be no more subsidy applicable to HHK for both imports and domestic production effective July, 2009. Consequently, the Agency henceforth is no longer in a position to approve the claims in respect of HHK. “3. Please note that though the directive says no more subsidy application for HHK, it is expected that you will continue to send all the white products (domestic production and imports) data for our records.” Mr. Ibikunle was able to comply with the Presidential directive and no payment was made until he was removed from office in February, 2011. In the final analysis, after the departure of Mr. Ibikunle, NNPC paid itself as arrears of subsidy for kerosene from August 2009 to December 2011, the sum of N310, 413, 963, 613.00 (Three Hundred and Ten
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Billion, Four Hundred and Thirteen Million, Nine Hundred and Sixty Three Thousand, Six Hundred and Thirteen Naira). During interaction with the Committee, Mr. Austin Oniwon, NNPC GMD sought to justify the payment by reference to a task force that was set up in the same year. However, there was no evidence of vacation of the Presidential order. As further justification, Mr. Oniwon also alluded to what he termed a “directive” to him by the Honourable Speaker of the House of Representatives, Right Honourable Aminu Waziri Tambuwal, CFR, not to sell kerosene above N50.00. Mr. Oniwon was summoned along with the Honourable Minister of Petroleum Resources on 6th July, 2011, to the floor of the House of Representatives to explain to the nation the reason for the virtual non-availability of kerosene at affordable price in the open market. A review of the entire Verbatim Record as well as its summary contained in the Votes and Proceedings of the House of Representatives, did not disclose any such directive by Mr. Speaker. What transpired was that after leading the House to believe that kerosene still enjoyed subsidy payment by Government in order to cap the price of the product at N50.00 by the GMD, the Speaker extracted a commitment from Mr. Oniwon to ensure that as from that day Kerosene was widely available and no longer sold
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beyond the N50.00 mark. The Verbatim Record of the National Assembly dated 7th July, 2011 vol. 1 No. 8 at page 24 quoted Mr. Oniwon as saying: “Your Excellency, Mr. Speaker, Your Excellency the Deputy Speaker and Hon. Members, with the efforts that we have put in place, the various meetings that we are holding and considering the volume of the products that we know is within our inland depots and within the Nigerian coastal waters, we do pledge before this honourable House that within three weeks sanity will return to the distribution of household kerosene and kerosene will be a commodity that is taken for granted the same way that PMS is being taken for granted in Nigeria today. The official price of kerosene is N50.00 per litre and I guarantee that every NNPC mega station will never sell beyond N50.00 per litre. I believe our colleagues, the marketers, will also sale at N50.00 per litre.” The day’s Votes and Proceedings dated 7th July, 2011 No. 9 at page 52 captured Mr. Speaker’s Concluding Remarks: “The Hon. Speaker in his concluding remarks urged the Ministry of Petroleum Resources and the NNPC to put in place more effective tracking system to ascertain effective delivery and distribution of products. He further urged IPMAN to demonstrate more patriotic concern for the plights of kerosene consumers in the country. The Hon. Speaker also advised the Nigeria Customs and Excise to
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strengthen patrol and other security measures at the nation’s boarders (sic), with a view to eliminating the smuggling of petroleum products outside the country.” Although this assurance given by Mr. Oniwon to Nigerians was not carried out, the request by Mr. Speaker to ensure compliance with a supposed government policy was within the legislative competence as envisaged in the Constitution. Even if it was a directive, subsidy payment on kerosene was made in April 2011, several months before the so-called directive. The Committee believed that, when it discovered that the removal of subsidy on kerosene was not expedient, the Ministry of Petroleum Resources should have gone back to the President for the vacation of the Directive. Having failed to do that and with the evidence that the product was never sold at N50.00 (apart from the 36 mega stations) since 2009, there was no basis for seeking any vacation of the order in 2011. But it is bad enough that vacating of the order was never sought, worse is the fact that NNPC and its Ministry merely arrogated to themselves the power to override the Presidential Directive. Moreover, the inefficiency of the NNPC, PPMC and Ministry of Petroleum Resources reflected in the failure to supply the products to Nigerian at affordable pricing, underscores the very concerns that led to the Presidential action i.e. “subsidy payment by Government on Kerosene do not reach the intended beneficiaries”.
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To further underscore their inefficiency, various agencies gave conflicting retail price of the product in the open market, where the selling price was close to the unsubsidised cost. During the period under review, kerosene was sold at the subsidised price only at the 36 NNPC mega stations out of over 24,000 retail outlets across the country. Nothing was also done to the appreciation of the Committee by any Agency to positively resolve the widely-held view that kerosene was being diverted. The Committee confirmed that the daily average consumption of Kerosene in Nigeria is between 9 to 10 million Litres, which can be comfortably accommodated if the output from the 445,000 bpd of Crude allocated to NNPC for local consumption is effectively and efficiently managed. The Kero-direct system even though populist and laudable if not efficiently managed could lead to abuses as a result of poor mechanism for tracking and verification. 3. Direct Deductions: The Committee established that NNPC deducted directly the sum of NGN408.255Billion (in addition to the payment of NGN81.648Billion by CBN) in 2009, the sum of NGN 407.801Billion (in addition of the payment of NGN402.423Billion by CBN) in 2010, and the sum of NGN847.942Billion (in addition to the payment of NGN 844.944Billion by CBN) for 2011 contrary to Section 162 of the 1999 Constitution (as amended).
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4. Over-deductions: It was further established that NNPC deducted the total sum of NGN844.944Billion as against the sum of NGN 540.419 Billion recommended by the PPPRA in 2011 thereby over-deducting the sum of NGN285.098Billion. 5.Demurrage: NNPC operated a very inefficient system of importation of petroleum products that led to piling up of demurrage payments. Requests by this Committee to the GMD to establish the exact figures yielded no results, typical of the opaque system of non-disclosure that reigned in the Corporation. 6. Sale of NNPC Petroleum Products by Capital Oil Limited. The Committee observed that NNPC entered into a Storage Agreement of Products with a Tank Farm Owner, Capital Oil Limited, and subsequently stored a total volume of 94,330,030 Litres in the tank farms of the company. However, due to alleged non-payment of the storage fees for a period of Nine (9) months, the Company sold the entire products belonging to NNPC ostensibly to recover the debt owed it by NNPC. The Committee noted that the Agreement did not give the company the right of off-set. Despite this lack of provision in the Agreement, NNPC bent the rules to accommodate the sale, in consideration of the Company’s undertaking to allow the Corporation to recover the value of the sold
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products and accruing interest on incurred sums, amortized over a period of time. IMPLICATIONS  This further underscores the abuse of processes and lack of regard for legal and ethical standards by NNPC as this whole transaction raises serious moral and ethical questions.  NNPC funded the repayment of the debt by continuing to patronize the company and by deducting 75% of the company’s storage charges to offset the debts which arose from the illegal sale. 7. Lack of transparency in its operations. It became very apparent to the Committee that the operations of the NNPC were opaque and not transparent. The implication on this is that it created room for abuses, inefficiencies and manifest lack of accountability. IMPLICATIONS  The total exemption of NNPC from the PPPRA guideline requirements had the consequence of making the Corporation to operate beyond the contemplation of laws and the Constitution of the Federal Republic.  It encouraged teaming and lading (inapplicability of checks and balances).  It distorted financial transparency and negated international accounting standards and practice.
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 It contributed to the practice of under-supply and/or diversion of products.  Treating with levity and impunity a clear Presidential Directive on withdrawal of subsidy on kerosene.  Whereas NNPC denied Nigerians utilisation of over N300 Billion for the benefit of other developmental programmes as subsidy illegally paid to itself on kerosene, the product involved was still not available in the market. NNPC/PPMC deliberately carried out a system of distribution using depot owners that had limited or no retail outlets, instead of product marketers who had retail outlets in every nook or cranny of the country, with a view to perpetrating fraud. This practice created artificial scarcity thereby imposing hardship on ordinary Nigerians by compelling them to buy the product at very high prices. 8. The 445,000 Barrels of Crude allocated to NNPC for local consumption. Out of the 445,000 barrels of domestic crude taken daily by NNPC, the Corporation refines 235,000 barrels locally and allocates the balance of 210,000 barrels to swap/off-shore processing arrangements.
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Although NNPC confirmed that it makes some savings of about =N= 11.00 per litre refining locally than import, it could not be established the Corporation reflects this cost differential in its claims to subsidy. IMPLICATION: The implication of this is that NNPC may have been collecting excess subsidy on locally refined products as the corporation appears to collect the same amount of subsidy on both locally refined and imported products. 9. NNPC GRANTS ITSELF DISCOUNT ON THE 445,000 BARRELS OF DOMESTIC CRUDE TAKEN EVERYDAY. Contrary to NNPC`s claim of taking the 445,000 barrels of crude daily at international market price, the committee established that NNPC was actually taking domestic crude at prices below the international market prices: A comparison between the prices at which equity crude was sold and the price at which NNPC took domestic crude in 2009, 2010 and 2011 confirmed total discounts of =N= 65.217 Billion, =N=24.321Billion and =N= 18.055 Billion respectively. In 2009, the following are examples:
Domestic Crude Discount Mth Price per Barrel ($) 2009 Feb Mar Aug 2010 Jan 73.933 75.860 1.927 43.8488 47.5893 70.1192 45.495 50.455 71.768 1.6462 2.8657 1.588 Equity Crude Price per Barrel per Barrel ($)
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May Jun 2011 Feb April May
72.970 74.142 103.817 121.347 115.780 104.837 123.004 117.866
75.618 75.001 1.020 1.657 2.086
2.648 0.859
RECOMMENDATIONS 1. NNPC should stop direct deductions and subject its transactions to the operational guidelines of the subsidy scheme. 2. The NNPC should refund to the Nigerian treasury, the sum of N310,414,963,613 (Three hundred and ten billion, four hundred and fourteen million, nine hundred and sixty three thousand, six hundred and thirteen naira only) paid to it illegally as subsidy for kerosene contrary to Presidential Directive. The NNPC should also refund to the Nigerian Treasury the sum of NGN285.098Billion being over-deductions as against PPPRA approvals for 2011. The Relevant Anti-Corruption Agencies should further investigate the Corporation for deductions for the years 2009 and 2010. 3. NNPC should conform to all guidelines applicable to importation under the PSF Scheme. 4. The relevant Anti-Corruption Agencies should carry out a due-diligence investigation to determine the total demurrage payments outstanding within the period under review.
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5. The Committee recommends that NNPC be unbundled to make its operations more efficient and transparent and this we believe can be achieved through the passage of a well drafted and comprehensive PIB Bill. 7. The Committee also recommends that the accounts of the Corporation be audited to determine its accounts profits and solvency. 8. NNPC’s petroleum products processing of the 445,000 barrels of domestic crude should be subjected to further inquiry by the Committee during its monitoring exercise.
9. On the issue of the refining of the 445,000 barrels of crude per day the NNPC should refund the discounts it granted to itself illegally between 2009 to 2011 amounting to =N= 108.648 Billion.
10 All those in the Management and Board of the NNPC directly involved in all the infractions identified for the years 2009-2011 should be investigated and prosecuted for abuse of office by the Code of Conduct Bureau.
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PIPELINES AND PRODUCTS MARKETING COMPANY LIMITED(PPMC). FINDINGS 1. PPMC Ltd. was incorporated in 1988 as a wholly owned limited liability company by NNPC to engage, among others, in efficient and effective evacuation of refined products from the refineries and the subsequent supply and distribution of petroleum products to every part of the country. PPMC’s transactions are limited to bulk products supply and transportation. 2. With regards to the PSF Scheme and subsidy claims, it had no direct relationship with PPPRA. PPMC received petroleum products from NNPC for distribution using its storage facilities and pipelines. However, out of a total 250 storage tanks (with total capacity for white products for 2,526,630mt), only about 100 were put to minimal utilization, due to what PPMC ascribed to pipeline vandalism. Even as a limited liability company, it was impossible to reconcile all PPMC’s statistics of petroleum products importation that were reconcilable with the records of other agencies. 3. The Committee recognised that pipeline vandalism was a major threat to effective product distribution across the country. 4. The Committee established that the PPMC played a direct role in encouraging a very inefficient system of distribution and supply of
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kerosene products which led to products scarcity and high cost to the consumer. 5. Contrary to PPMC claims the Committee found out that even the NNPC affiliate retail stations were not supplied with kerosene products by the PPMC despite deposits paid for the product. 6. The management of PPMC appeared not to be alive to its responsibilities and on-top of its duties. A case in point is the embarrassing failure of the Managing Director to provide the Committee with the retail market price of Kerosene, even though the Nation solely depends on the company for the supply and distribution of the product. IMPLICATIONS  Non utilisation of its huge storage tanks increased the cost of subsidy claims as it paid N3 per litre to other tank farm owners.  Even as a bulk distributor of kerosene, PPMC failed to provide record of volume of the product consumed daily not to talk of the average price per litre across the country.  The system of product allocation by PPMC is not transparent  Even though NNPC deducted subsidy payments illegally and against Presidential Directive, the action by PPMC resulted in ordinary Nigerians paying exorbitant prices of between N130.00k to 170.00k per litre for the Kerosene products.
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RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. The Committee recommends that the PPMC Management be overhauled. 2. Distribution of products, especially kerosene, should be done through NNPC Retail, Independent Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria (IPMAN) and Major Oil Marketers Association of Nigeria (MOMAN) to ensure availability and affordability of the products to Nigerians. In furtherance to the above recommendations, institutional mechanisms be urgently developed to ensure the monitoring of actual delivery of kerosene to the Nigerian masses. 3. The PPMC should deploy modern state-of-the-art devices to protect its facilities and pipelines to eliminate wastages arising from vandalism. In the short-term however, PPMC should establish a surveillance system which should incorporate Community-protection and using part of the bridging funds on the PSF Template to finance this. INDEPENDENT INSPECTORS FINDINGS 1. The PPPRA is expected to assign Independent Inspectors interchangeably referred to as Independent Monitors and/or Industry Consultant to measure and certify the quantity of products imported and supplied by the importer-companies. They are also required to analyse the quality specifications of the products and ascertain the quantity of Bunker Fund in the Vessel to avoid adulteration and volume distortions.
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2. The Committee could not confirm the presence or the identity or even the existence of this category of participants under the PSF Scheme. 3. It appears to the Committee unlikely that this category of stakeholders exist especially in the light of the following: (a) the widely reported many cases across the Country of domestic fire incidents as a result of adulterated HHK and the vehicle engine knocks attributed to the availability of adulterated fuel in Nigeria, and (b) the inability of any of the Government Agencies to produce incontrovertible evidence of or even present any consistent data on the quantity of products imported into Nigeria provides a firm basis to conclude that these Independent Inspectors are non-existent IMPLICATIONS It appears that the implementation Guidelines of the PSF Scheme was circumvented to the extent that this vital platform of Independent Inspectors, Independent Monitors or Industry Consultants was deliberately supplanted or side lined. DEPARTMENT OF PETROLEUM RESOURCES (DPR) FINDINGS 1. Failure in Quantity Certification: With regards to the PSF, DPR was saddled with the responsibility to verify the quality and quantity of
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petroleum products imported and supplied by marketers. It was also to monitor products supply and distribution chain, and to enforce prices set by the Guidelines. Surprisingly, DPR could not provide verifiable information on the quantity of products supplied, especially between 2009 and 2011. 2. Product Quality Grade Supervision: It is common industry knowledge that there is more than one quality type of PMS specification, (leaded and unleaded etc). But the PMS imported included leaded and unleaded, and sold at the same price to unsuspecting Nigerians. 3. Non Imposition of Sanctions for Selling Kerosene Above Subsidy Price: The DPR did not gear itself up for the enforcement of price on kerosene. It also failed to sanction violators of the price regime on kerosene. 4. Providing PPPRA with information: Contrary to one of the core
functions under the PSF, DPR failed to furnish the PPPRA with data relating to products supply and distribution for both imports and local productions and collaborate on intelligence malpractices. monitoring to check
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5. Diversion of Products: Lack of monitoring of trucked out products, distribution/sales of petroleum products as well as poor supervision of retail outlets by DPR led to diversion and smuggling of petroleum products. IMPLICATIONS  This abdication of statutory responsibility resulted in huge gap in planning and budgeting process of the country.  This failure of DPR to classify petroleum products into the two different grades led to unsuspecting Nigerians to possibly buy the lower-grade products at a higher price.  All sorts of violators continued their activity with reckless abandon.  The confirmation before the Committee of lack of the capacity to monitor the retail outlets across the country is quite worrisome.  As a result of the inability of DPR to monitor the importation, distribution and sale of petroleum products nationwide, they have no records to establish daily consumption and product stock levels across the country.  Nigerians are subsidizing the products consumed by other countries, as huge volume of the product finds its way into neighbouring countries through diversion and smuggling. RECOMMENDATION: All staff involved in the verification and confirmation of product importation should be transferred out and sanctioned for incompetence,
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collusion and possibly investigated and prosecuted for fraud by the Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies PETROLEUM (PEFMB) FINDINGS 1. The PEFMB under the PSF Guidelines is assigned to provide the PPPRA with regular data on local products distribution including bridging indices. It is also expected to ensure that the bridged products are received at invoiced destinations, and report defaulting operators to PPPRA for appropriate action, and collaborate with DPR and PPPRA on intelligence monitoring. 2. The Honourable Minister of Petroleum Resources in her testimony before the Committee gave as one of the reasons for the removal of subsidy, the fact that PMS was being diverted to neighbouring countries. 3. There was clear evidence that the PEF (MB) did not carry out the functions required of it by the PSF Guidelines, especially as the Agency relied more on data from other agencies whose data leaves much to be desired. 4. During the appearance before the Committee, the Executive Secretary failed to provide either the requested data on products distribution nor information or report on any form of malpractices it
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EQUALISATION
FUND
MANAGEMENT
BOARD
observed, noticed or investigated and reported to PPPRA under the Scheme. 5. PEF lacked the capacity to track the movement of products from point of loading to point of discharge (retail outlets). IMPLICATIONS 1. 2. The PEF(MB) as presently constituted does not have the capacity to carry out its very vital role under the PSF. The failure in providing PPPRA with vital data on products distribution and bridging indicates that this data did not in fact exist within its operations. 3. Despite having its operations funded from the PSF, the PEF (MB) failed in most of the responsibilities assigned under the Guidelines. Moreover, in the face of damning evidence of malpractice and corruption in the products distribution and bridging regime, the PEF (MB) made not a single report of a defaulting operator to the PPPRA/DPR. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. The present Management of PEF (MB) should be overhauled and the Board when reconstituted should comprise of persons of impeccable integrity who must be knowledgeable in aspects of their mandate.
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2.
PEF should establish a tracking system on all trucks from point of loading to point of discharge (retail outlets) and make regulations for all trucks involved with transportation of products to install approved tracking devices on them.
3.
This Ad-Hoc Committee shall in its monitoring stage conduct extensive and thorough investigation into the operations of the PEF(MB) in order to ascertain the management of the bridging funds under the subsidy regime. MINISTRY OF PETROLEUM RESOURCES
FINDINGS 1. DIRECT DEDUCTIONS AT SOURCE BY NNPC: The Ministry played a supervisory role over its agencies and carried out its functions through NNPC and other agencies under its ambit. Although it was supposed to be an oil marketer as far as the PSF Scheme was concerned, NNPC deducted what it considered its own share of subsidy claims at source before making returns to the Federation Account. The Committee confirmed that the Ministry was well aware and even approved this practice. discourage it. The Ministry sought to defend the practice by placing reliance on Section 162 (on maintaining a Federation Account) of the Constitution and
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Even though the practice predated the period
under investigation (2009 – 2011) efforts should have been made to
claiming authorization from the 2011 Appropriation Act. As mentioned above, these justifications were an afterthought and unfounded as the practice clearly run counter to these provisions. Owing to this practice, the nation lost huge sums of money over several years, the exact sum of which may never be determined. IMPLICATIONS:  The Ministry, kept a watchful eye while an agency under its direction illegally depleted amount of distributable pool available to the three tiers of government.  It resulted in escalation of “subsidy” claim.  The Ministry in condoning this practice over the years encouraged NNPC to treat the laws of the land with levity. This practice led to abuse of office.  Affront against the clear provisions of the Constitution of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, especially Section 80 thereof. 2. DEDUCTIONS BY NNPC ABOVE PPPRA RECOMMENDED FIGURES As stated earlier, it was established that NNPC deducted figures above what was recommended by the PPPRA as subsidy payments due to it. Curiously and disturbingly this abuse was done without any action by the Ministry to call the Corporation to order, confirming the suspicion that NNPC acted with the permission of its Supervisory Ministry, especially since the Honourable Minister of Petroleum Resources is the Chairman of the NNPC Board.
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3.
LACK OF GRASP OF THE PSF SCHEME: The PSF was a Government Policy in the downstream sector and the Ministry’s core responsibility here was to monitor the Policy so as to render maximum value and secure best services to the nation. We established that the expectation that the Ministry should have the most comprehensive overview of the Scheme was not met. It failed to exercise the measured grip on the PSF Scheme expected of an apex authority. Various schedules to this report show that contravention of Regulations set by officials themselves was deliberate, and fraud was systemic. At best, the Ministry could be said to be unaware of the malfeasance and its scale, but several happenings pointed to more than willful ignorance and bordered on collaboration or connivance. For example, there was no record that the Ministry investigated a grievous allegation by major marketers of the generally held view of diversion of kerosene to service the aviation industry at a period millions of ordinary citizens could not obtain the household product. And there was outright denial by all the agencies that they received any such ministerial directive, or took their own initiative to investigate that or other such allegations. Incidentally, the Federal Ministry of Justice received one such petition on product misappropriation and distortion of quantity of delivery records and, commendably, caused it to be investigated by the security agencies. Essentially, external events and players continued to dictate the pace of response in the Ministry.
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REFORMS IN THE SECTOR It is worthy to note that the Ministry initiated some level of reforms commencing from August of 2011 to improve on the process. This is evident in the appointment of new heads of some of the dysfunctional agencies. In particular the Committee notes that the current Executive Secretaries of PPPRA and DPR have focused on ensuring that the running of the two agencies is done in a more transparent and open manner. It is also to the credit of the Ministry that of recent several task forces have been set up to look into various operations of the sector, an action that acknowledges the deep rot in the oil and gas industry, and that appears to be in response to the public outrage over the deep malaise in the sector. This action equally underscores the lack of institutional capacity of the Ministry to provide effective supervision of the sector. IMPLICATIONS:  The Ministry flouted express presidential directive on kerosene  Although the Honourable Minister acknowledged sharp practices and manipulation in the industry, which have become quite evident from this investigation, the Ministry of Petroleum Resources failed to act in time to stem the corrupt practices. 4. LACK OF STATISTICS: Section 7 (1) of the NNPC Act provides: “The Corporation shall keep proper accounts and proper records in relation thereto in a form which
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shall conform with the best commercial standards”. All the parastatals under the Ministry have similar statutory obligations to maintain reliable information data bank. This is not surprising given the value of credible information in planning in the industry and for national economy. Our experience during the course of the investigation confirmed the generally held view that any information from the agencies was to be treated with utmost caution. We found that the Ministry was aware of this The Honourable unacceptable lacuna but all it could do was lament.
Minister said in this regard: “As we all know, getting the right statistics has been a challenge in our country. And it was even tougher getting actual PMS consumption figures from PPPRA when I took over the agency last year”. IMPLICATIONS: The Bureaucracy in the ministry appear to be weak and clearly lacks the capacity to provide the necessary administrative support to a ministry that is so strategic to the economy.  Poor statistics hinders effective planning, research and development.  Lack of transparency, contrary to our laws, including the NEITI Act, mandating observance of transparency and accountability in the extractive industry. 5. REASONS FOR THE RISE IN SUBSIDY CLAIMS: We established that subversion of the PSF Guidelines propelled by unashamed urge to swindle and defraud government were the real
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reasons the subsidy claims rose dramatically.
However, the Ministry Other
consistently advocated different reasons for the escalation.
members of the Executive arm of Government merely chorused the Ministry’s justification. The Honourable Minister’s written testimony to the Committee encapsulated this fact, thus: “Mr. Chairman, our evaluation of the situation indicates that subsidy payments have increased tremendously over the past two (2) years. The underlining reason for the dramatic change is not far-fetched. In recent times, we have seen national demand rise to forty-two (42) million litres for PMS and eleven (11) million for DPK. The growth is supported by a corresponding increase in PEF payments, resulting from increased bridging. In addition, crude prices which have a direct impact on international product pricing have been firm in the last two (2) years. It is the combination of these factors of increased demand, petroleum product prices and the increasing requirement and cost incurred to bridge products across the country that have resulted in the increases that have been observed in subsidy claims and payment.” Various facts and figures established by this Committee belie this assertion. The graph showing international price of crude between 2009 and 2011, and that on rate of foreign exchange (one of the false reasons mentioned by officials then but here omitted by the Honourable Minister), as well as tales showing consumption pattern are referred. But the Committee’s suspicion of a cover-up was strengthened by the fact that some of the reasons ascribed for the rise in subsidy claims have been
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articulated by informed citizens but those reasons were vehemently denied by the Ministry and its officials. For instance, a former Executive Secretary of PPRPA, Mr. A. Ibikunle (August 2009 to February 2011), castigated Mallam Sanusi Lamido Sanusi, the CBN Governor, for raising alarm on the rise of subsidy claims. In a letter referenced A.3/9/125/C.10/1/201, and dated December 16, 2010, he informed the Governor that the Agency took exception to the Governor’s stand for daring to voice out a concern that, as we all know now, merely scratched the problem on the surface. Another Executive Secretary of the Agency, Mr. Goddy Egbuji (February to August 2011), as late as 2012, still defended their action and maintained during interaction with the Committee that escalation of cost of subsidy claims was “a normal growth”. IMPLICATION:  The Ministry failed to provide reliable information to Government and the people on reasons for the rise of subsidy figures. 6. FLOUTING PRESIDENTIAL DIRECTIVE ON KEROSENE: It has been noted that NNPC processed payment in 2011 allegedly for kerosene consumed in 2009 and 2010. This payment was made in spite of a Presidential Directive specifically addressed to the Honourable Minister of Petroleum Resources. Incidentally, the Honourable Minister was also Chairman of the Board of Directors of NNPC. The Committee
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could not find any reason why the Minister, if convinced on the need to reinstate subsidy on kerosene did not take any action on that, instead of condoning the illegal payments. 7. POOR SUPERVISORY ROLE OVER THE AGENCIES UNDER THE MINISTRY: Given the wide-spread nature of abuses, fraud, sharp-practices, manipulations, massive corruption and inefficiencies that held sway in the management of the various agencies under the Ministry, it is very clear that the Ministry failed in its supervisory responsibilities. The Committee could not establish any punitive measures taken by the Ministry to stem the massive corruption or to bring perpetrators to book. Instances of the turning of importation by PPPRA into a bazaar, illegal payments to itself by PPPRA, extra-budgetary expenditures, illegal deductions for kerosene subsidy, and payment above PPPRA recommended figures by NNPC, inefficient and fraudulent system of kerosene distribution by PPMC and several other acts of malfeasance attest to this. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. It is hereby recommended that Mr President should reorganize the Ministry of Petroleum Resources to make it more effective in carrying out the much needed reforms in the oil and gas sector. 2. The Committee recommends that two Ministers should be appointed to take charge of upstream and downstream sector.
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NIGERIA CUSTOMS SERVICE (NCS) FINDINGS 1. Under the PSF Guidelines, the issuance of clearance by the Nigeria Customs Service is a mandatory component of the PPPRA import documents checklist. 2. The Nigeria Custom service is constitutionally mandated to supervise all goods imported into or exported out of Nigeria. With specific reference to the importations of petroleum products under the PSF scheme, the Customs are required to issue clearance to discharge or unload products and indicate the quantity to be so discharged or unloaded on the clearance document. 3. The Nigeria Customs Service had no access to the Mother vessels because they did not anchor in Nigerian waters and this led to losses of revenue to Nigeria from port charges etc. 4. Both the Central Bank of Nigeria and the Federal Ministry of Finance instructed the Customs Service not to ask for documents on PMS imported by the NNPC as in the case of the other importers. Customs was restricted to collecting Single Goods Declaration Forms subsequent to the importation cycle. 5. The Committee established through the testimony of Nigeria Customs Service that NNPC owes the Service the sum of NGN46Billion. IMPLICATIONS
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1. That the Central Bank of Nigeria and Federal Ministry of Finance have prevented the Nigeria Custom Service from carrying out its statutory function. 2. Customs could not provide information regarding imports of petroleum products. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. All the extant circulars preventing the Nigeria Customs Service from carrying out its statutory functions be immediately withdrawn by the Central Bank of Nigeria and the Federal Ministry of Finance. 2. The role of the Customs Service must be restored and all imports of Petroleum Products must be liable to expedited clearance by the Nigeria Customs Service even if these products are duty free under the existing excise and duty regime. 3. The Committee recommends that NNPC must take appropriate steps to settle this debt of N46billion owed the Nigeria Customs Service. NIGERIAN PORTS AUTHORITY (NPA) FINDINGS 1. The Nigerian Ports Authority is charged with the responsibility of issuing clearance to allow vessels to berth at the Jetty after payment of Port dues based on the size of the ships and volume of products as stated in the Bills of Lading. It also scheduled the vessels for berthing. 2. NPA also collects Port Charges as revenue accruing to Government.
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IMPLICATIONS 1. Available evidence have controverted the assertion that it was because of the shallow draught of Nigerian waters that made it necessary for Mother Vessels to anchor at offshore Lome or Cotonou. This is because the waters in Lome and Cotonou do not have deeper or better draught than Nigeria. 2. The Non-submission to Government by the NPA of any programme to improve the draught of Nigerian waters, especially as we are an oil producing country with expected heavy traffic of Mother vessels and tankers, raises a lot of questions as to the authenticity of the low-draught excuse. RECOMMENDATION: 1. The failure of NPA to provide this Committee the vital vessel data particularly the IMO numbers which would have assisted the Committee in establishing cases of round-tripping is an indication that either NPA has a very poor record keeping system or that it was a deliberate ploy to cover up the collusion between its officials and importers. 2. The National Assembly through its Committees having oversight over the NPA and the Ministry of Transport should engage with relevant
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stakeholders and develop a milestone plan to achieve the development of draught capacity into and around Nigerian ports. 3. The port operations of the Nigerian Ports Authority be investigated with a view to determining the extent to which its officials are complicit in the classification of maritime areas for reception of Nigerian bound petroleum products as “offshore Cotonou” and “offshore Lome” in the face of evidence that these Vessels never did lighter at those Ports. NIGERIAN NAVY (NN) FINDINGS 1. Under the PSF Guidelines, specifically the checklist for import documents, it is evident that the Nigerian Navy is assigned the role of issuing clearance certificate for the vessels entering Nigeria with imported petroleum products. 2. The statement by the Navy that it had data only on vessels and importer-companies that came forward to the Navy offices seeking its clearance showed that like the case with the Nigerian Customs, impediments were placed limiting the participation of the Navy in the PSF process. 3 NIMASA claimed to have arrested some vessels that were engaged in round-tripping of petroleum products and handed them over to
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the Navy but claimed that the Navy released them without further recourse to NIMASA. IMPLICATIONS 1. Every importer is mandated to provide the PPPRA at least 3 days’ notice of arrival of the vessel bearing its imported petroleum products. The PPPRA failed to provide the Navy of this notification to enable them track the vessels and ensure that no ship which entered Nigerian waters under the PSF scheme, was able to avoid Naval oversight. 2. No effort was made to make the Navy a strategic partner in the PSF Scheme by vesting it with major Maritime responsibilities. 3. The Navy was very ineffective in the confirmation of the actual volume it gave clearance to, at the point of discharge. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. The PPPRA must provide the Nigerian Navy advance copies of allocation and vessel arrival notifications documents to enable the Navy monitor, track and interdict vessels seeking to avoid naval certification. 2. Further investigation on the NIMASA report on MT Sea Phantom and MT Torm Esbjerg vessels arrested for violating maritime laws
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which was handed over to the Navy but was released immediately without recourse to NIMASA should be conducted by the Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies, and all those found culpable punished accordingly.
SECTION B: Marketers FACILITY/DEPOT OWNERS FINDINGS 1. Under the PSF Guidelines the facility and depot owners were expected to ascertain the volume of products discharged into their respective storage tanks and monitor their distribution through the opening and closing inventory stocks as well as through an appropriate means of ullaging. 2. The absence of modern facilities like tamper proof meters at these facilities and depots compounded the challenge of securing an accurate recording of products movements and statistical data needed for monitoring, planning and development. 3. During their testimonies at the Committee hearing, the level of confusion exhibited in outlining the methods adopted in ascertaining
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volumes offloaded into their storage and the manner of keeping track of the products during truck- outs was quite revealing. It was evident that there were platforms of collusion established between some facility/depot owners, staff of DPR, PPPRA and Consultants which clearly undermined the accurate reporting of movement of petroleum products in and out of the facilities/depots. 4. It was established that facilities/Depots owners and the NNPC/PPMC were the worst culprits in this regard. IMPLICATIONS 1. By failing to perform the tasks assigned to them under the Scheme, facility and depot owners, including the NNPC/PPMC, deprived Nigerians the opportunity of optimizing the volumes of PMS imported under the scheme and provided the foundation for widespread corruption and waste through collusion and a self-imposed inability to provide reliable data upon which accurate volumes of subsidy due could be ascertained. 2. The NNPC/PPMC being the largest importer of PMS under the scheme was the worst culprit in this regard. The results was also that, since the NNPC was the sole keeper of the records of the volume of its imports, the non-availability of alternative sources of data from an efficient depot records system, enabled the NNPC to fix the volume claimed to have been actually imported and offloaded, and thereafter determine its due subsidy and illegally deduct same at source.
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RECOMMENDATION: 1. The DPR must take immediate steps to bring all facilities and depot owners into compliance with international best practices by ensuring the installation of modern metering gadgets and sealable and nonreturn valves. 2. The DPR must brace up to its role of regulation and compel the NNPC/PPMC to comply with all the regulations issued to ensure transparency and accountability. 3. This Ad-Hoc Committee shall carry out a forensic investigation to determine the capacity of the facilities/Depots vis-à-vis the claims for volumes offloaded, even based on the non-credible records being paraded by some of the owners/operators. OIL MARKETING/TRADING COMPANIES FINDINGS 1. As core participants in the PSF Scheme, Oil Marketing/Trading Companies were required by the Guidelines to, among other things: (a) (b) Import, supply and distribute products nationwide. Comply with Rules and Regulations set by the PPPRA concerning products scheduling, shipment to Jetties, products transportation through the pipeline network/Trucks/rail to storage depots and evacuation to retail outlets.
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(c) (d) (e)
Submit on a monthly basis, data on products supply and distribution. Allow PPPRA operatives to monitor products movement from Jetties to the depots and from depots to retail outlets. Furnish PPPRA with three (3) Spiral bound copies of the import documents sequentially arranged as prescribed in the checklist in Appendix II of the Guidelines.
2.
It was clear during the public hearing of the Committee that most of the Oil Marketing/Trading Companies involved in the products importation under the Scheme were unaware of these responsibilities and did not therefore make any efforts to comply with them, except, of course, for the “import, supply and distribute products nationwide”. first item
3.
It was obvious at the hearing that whilst throwing open the doors for all comers to participate in the PSF and watering down the eligibility criteria, the Management of PPPRA (2009 – 2011) failed to exact or procure compliance by the Oil Marketing/Trading Companies with their core responsibilities under the Scheme. IMPLICATIONS
1.
The non-compliance of Oil Marketing/Trading Companies with their responsibilities in the Guidelines also contributed to the
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challenges
and
inefficiencies
discovered
with
the
implementation of the PSF Scheme. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Oil Marketers/Trading Companies must be compelled to adhere strictly to the Guidelines and carryout the responsibilities imposed on them to the letter. 2. Penalties must also be indicated for non-compliance and promptly imposed to ensure the smooth operation of the Scheme. 4. In the specific instance of Venro Energy Limited with falsified Form
M No. MF475241 BA No. 03320104910009 purportedly dated 24/9/10 which was used in the subsidy scheme by the company; the Committee recommends that the matter should be further investigated by the relevant anti- Corruption Agencies. 5. With regards to VITOL SA evidence against MOBIL Nig. Ltd on the issue of products brought in through MT Mileura, the Committee recommends that Mobil Nig. Ltd be further investigated and if found culpable prosecuted by relevant anti- Corruption Agencies. 6. The Committee also recommends that only Marketers with Tank Farms of a minimum of 5,000MT should henceforth qualify for participation under the Scheme.
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NIGERIAN FLAGGED VESSELS FINDINGS 1. A Nigerian Flagged Vessel is a ship registered in Nigeria and which flies the Nigerian Flag. Most Nigerian Flagged vessels are owned by Nigerians. 2. The Cabottage Act, 2003 was, inter alia, to ensure the development of local content in the growth of the maritime sector through provisions which seek to ensure the participation of Nigerian owned vessels in the maritime sector. 3. During the hearing of the Committee there was evidence that despite the existence of serviceable Nigerian owned vessels, the NNPC, which has the largest import volume under the PSF, deliberately excluded these vessels from deriving revenue by engaging foreign vessels to render the same service. IMPLICATIONS 1. NNPC acted in a manner to frustrate Nigeria’s national objectives in the Maritime Sector. 2. The NNPC by the action of depriving Nigerian owned/Flagged vessels of some patronage, failed to utilize the opportunity to not
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only develop the indigenous maritime sector, but also to enhance our maritime security and create more jobs. RECOMMENDATION 1. Under the PSF Scheme, importers especially NNPC, be encouraged to patronize Nigerian Flagged vessels provided they produce the standard safety and sea-worthiness certificates in tune with international best practices.
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SECTION C: Marine Forensics
INVESTIGATION OF ILLEGAL ACTIVITIES LIKE DELIVERY, SHORT-DELIVERY, ETC BY OM/TC‟S ROUNDTRIPPING, NON-
RESULTS FROM SPECIAL FORENSIC MARITIME INVESTIGATION IN COLLABORATION WITH LLOYDS OF LONDON INTELLIGENCE UNIT, (SAMPLE OF FINDINGS):
NNPC IMPORTS:
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Analysis of samples from NNPC direct controlled importation of PMS in 2011.
1. NNPC/NIGERMED imported 31,343.802MT PMS on board MT Sanmar Stanza to Offshore Lagos SPM (Single Point Mooring) platform. NNPC document submitted to the Ad-Hoc Committee did not state where this cargo was discharged to between 07 Jan – 13 Jan 2011 as stated. NPA document capture Sanmar Stanza as being offshore Lagos at the period and discharged for 6 days, but again did not say where the 31,343.80 MT was discharged into. NNPC may be invited to account for the where about of this cargo. Lloyd’s Agency Nig 2011 captured the vessel between 16/1/11 to 23/1/11 and 24/1/11 and 28/1/11 but still failed to state where the cargo of 31,343.802MT of PMS was discharged into. 2. NNPC imported 31,444.764 of PMS on board MT Freja Dania to Offshore Lagos SPM. The PMS cargo was discharged on 19 Jan 2011 (one day) according to NNPC submitted document. It did not state to where the cargo was discharge into. NPA document confirm MT Freja Dania arrived offshore Lagos and discharged for 5day as against 1 day but failed to indicate where the cargo had been discharged to. MT Freja was also found on Lloyd’s Agency Nigeria and matched, however, NNPC to be invited to account for the where about of the 31,444.764MT of PMS cargo. 3. NNPC/NIGERMED imported 32,070.501MT of PMS from Abidjan on board Handy Tankers Miracle between 16/1/11and 18/1/11, their document stated that cargo was discharged at Atlas Cove Jetty facility. NPA document confirmed
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vessel arrived from Abidjan but did not state where cargo was discharged. Lloyd’s Intelligence listed vessel as having been around Apapa Lagos same period. However, since NPA failed to say where they took this vessel to discharge, the onus is on NNPC/NIGERMED to say where they put the cargo of 32,070.501MT of PMS. 4. NNPC/NIGERMED imported 38.413.412MT between 05/1/11 and 19/1/11 on board UNIQUE EXPLORER from Amsterdam to SPM offshore and discharged 9 days from 17/2/11 to 26/2/11. NPA recorded Unique Explorer as having brought same quantity of products for 4days, between 5/2/11 and 8/2/11. These two accounts contradict each other except for the quantity. Navy document did not capture the vessel. Since NNPC document said that vessel was at SPM and no indication of trans-shipment took place, they should be invited to shed more light on where this cargo of 38,413.412MT of PMS is. 5. NNPC/NIGERMED imported 34,854.623MT of PMS on board MT TORM
GERTRUDE between 15/2/11 and 31/1/11 and moored at SPM Apapa-Lagos. There was no indication of trans shipment on any vessel(s) and/or where the whole cargo was discharged into. NPA document showed that MT Tom Gertrude arrived with cargo from Amsterdam and discharged her cargo for 18days (10/3/11 – 27/3/11) which corresponded with discharge dates in NNPC documents. However, neither NPA nor NNPC stated where the cargo was discharged into since SPM is an offshore mooring platform and not storage facility. Therefore NNPC/NIGERMED should be called upon to account for this 34,854.623MT of PMS.
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7.
NNPC/Duke etc imported 32,892.207 MT of PMS on board MT Tristar
Kuwait. Mt Tristar berthed at the Apapa SPM which has no receiving facility. No further details given either on transfer or receipt of the product. Tristar listed in NPA, AIS Nigeria. Discharge at the SPM was said to be between 5/5 and 9/5 (5days). But discharge to where? NNPC may have to account for the whole cargo of 32,892.207 MT or say where it was discharged to. 8. NNPC/Duke/Ontario through MT Gamma Tank brought in 53,006.309 MT PMS. By NNPC account the cargo was discharged for 23days (30/04-23/05 2011). Out of the whole parcel, MT Capt. Gregory trans-shipped 9,915.702mT, co-loading with MT Emmanuel Tomasos. Apart from the above, no information on where the balance of the cargo went was not available. This particular cargo link could not be followed. In our view, NNPC/Duke may have to account for the entire cargo of 53,006.309 MT instead of part thereof. 9. NNPC through Tristar Dubai brought a cargo of 32,921.207MT from Cotonou. The discharge according to NNPC document would be from 06/05 – 13/05 ie 8days was as follows: 17,001.113 MT would be discharged to NOJ while 15,920.094 would go into Apapa. NPA document showed that vessel brought 33,064MT from Cotonou, Lloyds AIS and LLI Agencies Nigeria did not list the vessel as having visited Apapa-Lagos at the time. Navy Excel document listed MT Tristar as having arrived PHRC Okirika between 17/03 and 16/04 with 28,102MT of PMS and with 15,036MT of PMS at NACJ about 27/04 and 26/05 2011. All the dates are so close that it would be near impossible to carry out all
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the voyages. In our view, NNPC may be required to give clear details on the 32,921.207MT. 10. PERFORMING- MT Moskalvo brought 32,804.984 MT and according to NNPC document discharged 17,726.298mt at SPM and 15,078.686 into Apapa. NPA document confirm ship call between 10/06 and 17/07 2011. However, the Lloyds AIS and LLI Agencies did not capture the vessel. Since SPM is a mooring facility, NNPC may be requested to account for the part of the 17,726.298MT cargo claimed to have been discharged into it. 11. NNPC/Duke – MT Nord Innovation BROUGHT IN 36,633.642 MT and discharged between 21/07/11 – 26/07/11 all 36,633.642mt in Apapa (PWA) Nord Innovation IMO No- 9555292, has DWT of 47,400 said to have arrived Apapa-Lagos on 19/07/11 – 26/7/11 to discharge. LLI Agency Nigeria list confirm arrival of ship at these dates so did AIS list. NPA recorded same quantity about same date but no indication of where this import was discharged. However, NAVY listed vessel as arriving SPM and PWA between 12/07- 11/08 2011 with zero quantity of cargo. NNPC to reconcile please. 13. Addax – MT Sea Phantom brought 6,170.328MT and discharge 29/7-2/08 at Addax Calabar. Navy List showed vessel went to NNPC jetty in Calabar with 6,500mT of imported product. Sea Phantom with IMO No 9326653 and DWT of 13,072mT was offshore Cotonou between 24/7 and 26 /07 2011. NPA may be asked to confirm if 13,072mT DWT vessel can deliver 6500mT safely at NNPC jetty in Calabar without draft constraints.
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14. PRACTIOL – MT ISOLACORALLO brought 36,771.952mT cargo to Apapa SPM. She discharged between 8/08 – 14/08 (7days). The Ship is not in NAVY List, not in AIS Nigeria 2011, and not in LLI Agency Nigeria 2011. However, ship is in NPA List as having come from Cotonou. Besides, SPM is a mooring facility, so NNPC is to say where this 36,771.952 cargo was put or what happened to it. What facility received the trans shipment? 15. PRACTIOL – MT BLUE ROSE brought 28,543.025mT between 13/08 – 21/08. 14,684.058 went into NACJ and 13,956.520mt into Apapa (PWA). Ship and cargo quantity are contained in the NAVY documents and approvals. The cargo is however to be discharged into NACJ only from 29/07 - 27/08 2011. The NPA List contains vessel’s name and cargo of 14,500mT in September 2011. These are conflicting information and only NNPC is in a position to confirm or straighten it out. The movement of MT Blue Rose was not however listed in AIS Nigeria 2011 or LLI Agency Nigeria 2011. 16. NNPC/Duke/- MT Tristar Dubai Ex Pink Star brought in 31,604.912mT. She discharged NACJ 15,089.431Mt between 6/09-25/09 and 6,515.481MT into PWA (Apapa). NPA document showed vessel loaded cargo from offshore Cotonou 31,602mT, arrived 6/09/11 and sailed 12/09/11. No indication of where product was delivered or discharged. Under the circumstances, the NNPC will have to confirm the cargo movement really.
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18.
NNPC/Duke – MT Marios G, Ext Pink Star loaded 34,156.029Mt,
discharged between 8/11-19/11; 16,860.255 to NACJ and 17,295.774 to Apapa. NPA document showed that Marios G took 34,281mT off Lome and discharged between 08/11-10/11. Marios G is also listed in LLI Agency data 2011 for about same date. Marios has IMO No 9418121 and a DWT of 50746. It is also in the Navy Excel document. 19. NNPC/NIGERMED imported 34,854.623MT of PMS on board MT TORM
GERTRUDE between 15/2/11 and 31/1/11 and moored at SPM Apapa-Lagos. There was no indication of trans shipment on any vessel(s) and/or where the whole cargo was discharged into. NPA document showed that MT Tom Gertrude arrived with cargo from Amsterdam and discharged her cargo for 18days (10/3/11 – 27/3/11) which corresponded with discharge dates in NNPC documents. However, neither NPA nor NNPC stated where the cargo was discharged into since SPM is an offshore mooring platform and not storage facility. Therefore NNPC/NIGERMED should be called upon to account for this 34,854.623MT of PMS. Recommendations:  To avoid further continuation of these macabre, competent consultants should be engaged by the NNPC, PPPRA, DPR and PPMC to monitor imports of products henceforth.
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 Competent consultants who can use arrival drafts and ballast details to calculate product quantity even before taken tank sounding may be engaged to checkmate any intentional fraudulent activities.  Bills of Lading must not only originate from point of shipment, but must be made available to appointed consultants, the ports authority, safety administration and relevant agencies.  When sending SEN on vessels arrivals, the crew list and IMO numbers of vessel must accompany requested documents.  Any appointed consultant(s) must use own verified ullaging tapes rather that the oil trader’s or marketer’s as most of them are compromised and therefore do not give correct readings.  Trading on oil offshore the coast of none refining of exporting country is illegal and contravenes maritime security. Therefore, the widely acclaimed offshore Cotonou and Lome for oil trade to Nigeria should be discouraged in its entirety. OTHER MARKETERS:
Samples of some Possible Anomalies in the deployment of Vessels Offshore Gulf of Guinea with PMS and HHK and their transhipment to Marine Terminals in Nigeria
Possible Anomalies were detected in the following transactions.
S/N PDT DATE OF DISCHARGE 13/2/09 MV BL DATE 28/12/10 PORT OF ORIGIN AMUA BAY COUNT RY OF ORIGIN VENEZUE LA MARKE TER A-Z PET MOTHER VESSEL MT ALPINE MAGNOLIA DAUGTHER VESSEL MT OKHOTSK SEA PORT OF TRANSHIPM ENT OFFSHORE LAGOS DV BL DATE 6/2/11 DISCHARGE JETTY INTEGRATED OIL JETTY APAPA DEPOT 18 PMS EVER OIL SHOR E TANK QTY 9,601,9 15.00 START PERIO D 14/12/ 10 END PERIOD 15/1/11
139
2 3
HHK HHK
25/4/09 26/4/09
17/3/09 17/3/09
AMUA BAY AMUA BAY
VENEZUE LA VENEZUE LA
A-Z PET A-Z PET
MT FAITHFUL MT FAITHFUL
MT POKATFINN MT ARCTURUS
OFFSHORE COTONOU OFFSHORE COTONOU
4/4/09 10/4/0 9
WAZIRI JETTY APAPA WAZIRI JETTY APAPA
A-Z DEPOT A-Z DEPOT
6,064,6 25.00 6,163,5 78.00
1/3/09 1/3/09
31/3/09 31/3/09
4
HHK
7/5//09
17/3/09
AMUA BAY
VENEZUE LA NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS
A-Z PET
MT FAITHFUL MT BALTIC FAITH MT BALTIC FAITH MT BALTIC FAITH MT BALTIC FAITH MT CITRON MT CITRON MT TRISTAR DUBAI MT TRISTAR DUBAI MT CHANCE MT CHANCE MT NS ASIA
MT TREASURE MT VALOR MT VALOR MT VALOR MT VALOR MT CRETE MT OCEAN PEARL MT NICOS TOMASOS MT CRETE MT VERA CRUZ NA MT MANUELA BOTTIGLIER I MT KRONBORG MT HIGH PROSPERIT Y MT HIGH ENTERPRISE MT HIGH PROSPERIT Y NA NA
OFFSHORE COTONOU OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE LAGOS OFFSHORE COTONOU OFFSHORE COTONOU OFFSHORE LOME OFFSHORE LOME OFFSHORE COTONOU OFFSHORE COTONOU OFFSHORE COTONOU NA NA
10/4/0 9 27/7/1 0 22/7/1 0 5/8/10 22/8/1 0 16/1/1 1 13/1/1 1 11/11/ 10 13/11/ 10 27/12/ 09 27/12/ 09 20/10/ 11 25/10/ 11 8/5/11 11/5/1 1 16/5/1 1 18/6/0 9 31/6/0 9
WAZIRI JETTY APAPA IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON IBRU JETTY IBAFON YINKA FOLAWIYO JETTY YINKA FOLAWIYO JETTY YINKA FOLAWIYO JETTY YINKA FOLAWIYO JETTY YINKA FOLAWIYO JETTY NISPAN JETTY NISPAN JETTY
A-Z DEPOT INTEG RATED INTEG RATED INTEG RATED INTEG RATED ZENON ZENON ZENON ZENON ZENON ZENON FOLAW IYO FOLAW IYO FOLAW IYO FOLAW IYO FOLAW IYO FOLAW IYO FOLAW IYO
6,163,5 78.00 11,081, 131.00 15,980, 418.00 9,319,9 20.00 3,815,2 55.00 21,733, 518.10 16,360, 806.77 21,526, 983.50 20,996, 835.00 21,434, 243.00 17,081 990.00 41,974, 360.00 41,654, 436.58 41,414, 254.00 41,166, 192.00 41,220, 354.00 45,154, 621.00 46,417, 450.00
1/3/09
31/3/09
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS
3/8/10 18/8/10 26/8/10 28/8/10 21/1/11 4/2/11 15/11/10 23/11/10 10/1/10 10/1/10 23/10/11
29/6/10 29/6/10 29/6/10 29/6/10 28/12/10 28/12/10 23/10/10 23/10/10 18/11/09 18/120/9/ 111/09
AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM
A-Z PET A-Z PET A-Z PET A-Z PET AP AP
GHENT GHENT PALDISKI PALDISKI SIKKA
BELGIUM BELGIUM ESTONIA ESTONIA INDIA
AP AP AP AP FOLAWIY O ENERGY FOLAWIY O ENERGY FOLAWIY O ENERGY FOLAWIY O ENERGY FOLAWIY O ENERGY FOLAWIY O ENERGY FOLAWIY O ENERGY
14/7/1 0 14/7/1 0 14/7/1 0 14/8/1 0 14/12/ 10 14/12/ 10 14/10/ 10 14/10/ 10 15/10/ 10 15/10/ 10 16/9/1 1 16/9/1 1 20/4/1 1 20/4/1 1 20/4/1 1 1/6/09 14/6/0 9
15/8/10 15/8/10 15/8/10 15/9/10 15/1/11 15/1/11 15/11/10 15/11/10 18/10/10 18/10/10 22/9/11
16
PMS
23/10/11
111/09
SIKKA
INDIA
MT NS ASIA
22/9/11
17 18 19 20 21
PMS PMS PMS PMS PMS
14/5/11 18/5/11 22/5/11 3/7/09 16/6/09
23/4/11 23/4/11 23/4/11 18/6/09 31/6/09
AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM AMSTERDAM ROTTERDAM
NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS NETHER LANDS
MT SILVAPLANA MT SILVAPLANA MT SILVAPLANA MT WILDEBEES T MT ADMIRAL
28/4/11 28/4/11 28/4/11 30/6/09 15/6/09
Analysis of Samples
1. A-Z Petroleum imported 9,601,915 litres of PMS which was transhipped from MT Alpine Magnolia offshore Lagos into MT Okhotsk Sea, Ex MT Ermar, Ex MT Sea Progress between 14/12/10 and 15/1/11 for discharge into Ever Oil Depot through Integrated Oil Jetty, Apapa, Lagos. The Ever Oil Depot is in Calabar and not in Lagos as shown in the PPPRA List. MT Alpine Magnolia, the mother vessel was not listed in the Lloyd’s AIS
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Nigeria 2010 List, Lloyd’s Agency Nigeria 2010 List so it may not have been offshore Lagos as noted in the PPPRA List. The mother vessel did not also call at Calabar as she was not listed in the NPA List for vessels that called at Calabar in December 2010 and January 2011. MT Okhotsk Sea, Ex MT Ermar, Ex MT Sea Progress was listed in the Lloyd’s AIS Nigeria 2011 List, Lloyd’s Agency Nigeria 2011 List as calling at Apapa but was not in NPA List for Calabar. There is need to check the records at Ever Oil Depot in Calabar to ascertain if such parcel was discharged at the depot. Moreover given the draft (9.9 metres) of the daughter vessel, it would have difficulty calling at Calabar Port with a draft restriction of 8.5 metres and channel draft of between 6.3 metres and 6.4 metres. 2. African Petroleum Plc imported 38,516,233 litres of PMS of which 21,434,243 litres was transshipped from MT Chance into MT Vera Cruz between 1/11/09 and 30/11/09 for discharge into Zenon Oil Depot through Ibru Jetty, Ibafon, Apapa, Lagos. MT Chance discharged the remaining parcel on board into Zenon Oil Depot through Ibru Jetty, Ibafon, Apapa, Lagos. There is no evidence that the daughter vessel MT Vera Cruz called at any Nigerian port within the period under review as there is no evidence in the NPA List for the period. The lightening operation took one month to complete and the mother vessel is smaller than the vessel that one
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begins to ponder on the rationale of using such vessel which will attract more charges for that transaction. IMPLICATIONS: What the above sample transactions indicate is that a lot of the shipments were characterized by anomalies, inconsistencies, and irregularities leading to the conclusion of wide-spread sharp practices, round-tripping and diversion of products. RECOMMENDATIONS: Given the need to do a more thorough work to establish the veracity or otherwise of the various shipments of products, the data obtained from Lloyds Intelligence List would be forwarded to the Relevant AntiCorruption Agencies who should conduct forensic verifications of all vessel movements. This would ensure that those marketers suspected to have engaged in round tripping, diversion of products and other sharp practices are identified and brought to book.
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SECTION D:
Financial Forensics
INVESTIGATION OF THE FINANCIAL TRANSACTION DOCUMENTS OF THE SUBSIDY SCHEME INTRODUCTION 1. Government had informed of its inability to continue to dole out as much as N1.3 Trillion to sustain the subsidy regime. The Nigerian people were given the impression that annual subsidy on PMS was N1.3 Trillion. Immediately the Committee hearings commenced, the N1.3 Trillion was no longer sustainable as the Accountant-General of the Federation put forward a figure of N1.6 Trillion and the CBN put its own figure at N1.7 Trillion. However, in the course of analysing the total amount paid as subsidy in the period under review, 2009-2011, the Committee came across 2 (two) separate subsidy payments to NNPC for each of these years, one from NNPC records of deductions, while the second was payment by CBN for the same years. NNPC’s direct deductions for 2009 were the sum of N408.255 Billion, for 2010 was N407.801 and N847.942 for 2011. The CBN payments to NNPC for these same years were the sum of N81.648 for 2009, N402.423 for 2010, and N844.944 for 2011. NNPC appears to have been collecting subsidy simultaneously from 2 (two) separate sources. If this 2011 NNPC subsidy payment figure is added, the total
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subsidy for 2011 would amount to N2, 587.087 Trillion. The Committee however recommends that the Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies be invited to further investigate, verify and ascertain the direct deductions and actual payments to/by NNPC. 2. In addition to the two bank accounts for the management of the subsidy regime, namely Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) Account and Domestic Excess Crude (Naira) Account, NNPC devised its own variant of direct deductions from the receipts on the 445,000 barrels daily Domestic Crude taken by it. NNPC was found to have been drawing from Federation Account since October, 2009. 3. While NNPC feasted on the Federation Account to bloat the subsidy payable, some of the Marketers took the option of claiming subsidy on products not supplied. PPPRA laid this foundation by allocating volumes of products each year to the marketers which it knows are not in conformity with its own guidelines for participation. 4. Apart from the proliferation and non-designation of bank Accounts for subsidy payment, PPPRA and the OAGF were unable to manage the disclosed two accounts transparently. There were indications that PPPRA paid N158 Billion to itself in 2009 and N157 Billion in 2010. The OAGF was unable to submit details of the bulk payments arrogated to PPPRA and the account from which the bulk sums were disbursed to the supposed beneficiaries.
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5. The nation did not need to have paid a subsidy of more than N894 Billion in 2011, which should have made available 11.5 Billion litres of PMS for the year or a daily consumption rate of 31.4 million litres. PPPRA’s average daily consumption of 59 million litres as per its presentation on 18/1/2012 was merely a projection to justify the figure on subsidy put forward by the OAGF. Even the bogus discharge figure disclosed by PPPRA shows a daily rate of 40.8 million litres per day as against the 59 million litres per day in PPPRA’s presentation. 6. Based on CBN subsidy figure of N1.739 Trillion and PPPRA’s subsidy rate per litre of N77.90 in 2011, volume of PMS that received subsidy in 2011 was 22.3 billion litres. However, PPPRA’s confirmed discharges were only N14.7 billion litres. This means that 7.6 billion litres got unmerited subsidy of N592 billion in 2011. What was actually paid was N2,587.087 Trillion and not even N1.7 Trillion. This huge difference of N900 Billion is to be found in NNPC’s subsidy drawing from both the Federation Account as confirmed by CBN and direct deductions from the Domestic Excess Crude (Naira) Account as confirmed by NNPC itself.
FINANCIAL INFRACTIONS:
1.01 Marketers That Obtained Forex But Not Found To Have
Utilized Same For Petroleum Products Importation
Some marketers were found to have obtained forex for petroleum products importation in the relevant years of 2009, 2010 and 2011, but
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could not be found to have utilized same for the purposes they were meant. This was established by comparing CBN submissions on Forex and PPPRA details of products supplies under the subsidy regime. The Table hereunder is intended to expose those who may have exploited the subsidy regime to engage in money laundering activities. Recommendations: The marketers identified under this category should be referred to Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies for further investigation with a view to establishing what they utilized the Forex obtained for. The Marketers are:
THOSE WHO OBTAINED FOREX BUT DID NOT IMPORT PETROLEUM PRODUCTS
S/N 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 NAMES OF MARKETERS BUSINESS VENTURES NIG LTD EAST HORIZON GAS CO. LTD EMADEB ENERGY POKAT NIG. LTD. SYNOPSIS ENTERPRISES LTD ZENON PET & GAS LTD. CARNIVAL ENERGY OIL LTD CROWNLINES ICE ENERGY PETROLEUM TRADING LTD INDEX PETROLEUM AFRICA RONAD OIL & GAS W/A SERENE GREENFIELD LTD SUPREME & MITCHELLES TRIDAX ENERGY LTD ZAMSON GLOBAL RES. 2010 $ 22,927,339.96 20,735,910.81 6,606,094.30 3,147,956.19 51,449,977.47 232,975,385.13 51,089.57 4,756,274.94 2,131,166.32 6,438,849.64 4,813,272.00 4,813,360.75 16,947,000.00 15,900,000.00 8,916,750.00 2011 $
TOTAL
337,842,663.86
64,767,763.22
1.02 Marketers That Did Not Obtain Forex But Were Found To
Have Supplied And Collected Subsidy On Petroleum Products
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Some other marketers who did not obtain Forex were found to have supplied petroleum products and collected subsidy thereon. The implication of this finding is that some persons may hide under the cover of the subsidy regime to launder illicit funds into the country. The Committee however recognized the fact that some marketers may have utilized their offshore funds to import petroleum products without purchasing Forex from CBN even though by procedure, they were supposed to have obtained Form “M”. Recommendations To separate the wheat from the chaff, the Committee recommends that relevant Anti - Corruption Agencies further investigate the transactions of this category of marketers listed below with a view to establishing their source of funds used for the importation of petroleum products in the years 2010 and 2011.
MARKETERS THAT DID NOT OBTAIN FOREX, BUT CLAIMED TO HAVE IMPORTED PETROLEUM PRODUCTS BASED ON WHICH THEY HAVE COLLECTED SUBSIDY S/N NAMES OF MARKETERS 2010 SUBSIDY AS PER ACCOUNTANT GENERAL N 257,396,183.68 1,685,869,439.29 3,991,754,441.53 247,184,147.50 2011 SUBSIDY AS PER ACCOUNTANT GENERAL N 10,992,583,784.50 963,796,199.85 2,944,681,700.17 1,988,141,091.10 3,189,069,707.43 4,061,148,533.35 2,706,273,858.82 3,060,232,335.26 2,660,902,801.58
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
BOVAS & COMPANY BRILA ENERGY LTD CEOTI LTD ECO – REGEN LTD EURAFIC OIL & COASTAL SERVICES LTD FIRST DEEP WATER DISCOVERY KNIGHT BRIDGE MOBIL OIL NIG. PLC NADABO ENERGY LTD
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10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
OCEAN ENERGY TRADING & SERVICES LTD ORIGIN OIL & GAS LTD SOMERSET ENERGY SERVICES SULPHUR-STREAM LTD SWIFT OIL FRAPRO INTERNATIONAL LTD FRADRO INTERNATIONAL LTD VIVENDI ENERGY NIG LTD TOTAL
959,012,939.72 7,141,217,151.72
1,778,180,051.20 2,703,454,122.11 2,056,208,548.22 4,758,693,052.00 5,062,403,548.18 1,486,837,448.90 1,148,792,391.50 1,095,790,255.02 55,019,978,401.14
1.03 Marketers That Were Not Registered With PPPRA Before
They Got Their First Allocation For Product Supplies
Some marketers were not registered with PPPRA before they got their first allocation for products supplies. This was ascertained from a schedule produced by PPPRA, which has been identified as PPPRA “Master Data on Marketers”. Registration with PPPRA is a condition precedent and the only process that could enable PPPRA document and appraise a marketer’s legal status with respect to incorporation and compliance with the provisions of Companies and Allied Matters Act of 1990, amongst others. This breach of this important process by PPPRA could have meant award of contract to legally non-existent companies. The marketers are:
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MARKETERS NOT REGISTERED WITH PPPRA BEFORE THEY GOT FIRST ALLOCATION FOR PRODUCT SUPPLIES
S/N 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 NAMES OF MARKETERS ANOSYKE GROUP OF COMPANIES BRILA ENERGY LTD CADEES OIL AND GAS LTD CEOTI LTD DOWNSTREAM ENERGY SOURCE DUPORT MARINE ECO-REGEN LTD FRADRO FRESH ENERGY LTD LINETRALE OIL LINGO OIL AND GAS COMPANY LOTTOJ OIL AND GAS LTD MENOL OIL AND GAS LTD NATICEL PETROLEUM LTD OAKFIELD SYNERGY NETWORK LTD OILBATH NIG LIMITED ROCKY ENERGY LTD PRUDENT ENERGY AND SERVICE LTD SPOG PETROCHEMICALS LTD YANATY PETROCHEMICALS NIG LTD DATE OF REGISTRATION WITH PPPRA 24TH JAN. 2011 15TH OCT. 2010 8TH APRIL 2011 26TH JAN. 2011 15TH OCT. 2010 5TH NOV. 2010 20TH JAN. 2011 20TH JAN. 2011 5TH AUG. 2011 1ST FEB. 2011 15TH OCT. 2010 12TH AUG. 2011 28TH JAN. 2011 10TH DEC. 2010 5TH AUG. 2011 4TH AUG. 2011 27TH JAN. 2011 12TH AUG. 2011 23RD JUNE 2010 15TH OCT. 2010 DATE OF 1ST ALLOCATION 18TH JAN. 2011 8th OCT. 2010 9TH FEB. 2011 18TH JAN. 2011 8TH OCT. 2010 8TH OCT. 2010 18TH JAN. 2010 18TH JAN. 2011 2ND AUG. 2011 30TH DEC. 2010 8TH OCT. 2010 18TH DEC. 2009 18TH DEC. 2009 10TH AUG. 2010 2ND AUG. 2011 2ND AUG. 2011 1ST JAN. 2011 2ND AUG. 2011 4TH JUNE 2010 8TH OCT. 2010
RECOMMENDATION: The Management is hereby reprimanded for awarding contracts to companies not registered with it at the time of award in contravention of its guidelines. 1.04
Marketers That Never Applied To PPPRA for Product Supplies Before They Got Their First Allocation
Some marketers were found not to have made any application to PPPRA for supplies of petroleum products before they got their first allocation. For a valid contract, there must be an offer and acceptance. Marketers who were found not to have applied for supplies contract with PPPRA are deemed not to have made any offer to PPPRA, based on which PPPRA
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may have accepted by allocating quantities of petroleum products to be supplied by the Marketers. This category of marketers may have rectified this anomaly in subsequent dealings with PPPRA but the initial action negated the guidelines. The companies are:
MARKETERS THAT DID NOT MAKE FIRST APPLICATION TO PPPRA FOR SUPPLIES BEFORE THEY GOT THEIR 1ST ALLOCATION
NO . 1 2 3 NAMES OF MARKETERS CADEES OIL & GAS LTD LOTTOJ OIL & GAS LTD MOB INTEGRATED SERVICES LTD DATE OF 1ST ALLOCATION DATE OF FIRST APPLICATION TO PPPRA 13TH JUNE 2011 11TH MAY 2011 20TH APRIL 2010 QUANTITY ALLOCATE D 15,000MT 10,000MT 15,000MT
9TH FEBRUARY 2011 18TH DECEMBER 2009 8TH OCTOBER 2008
RECOMMENDATIONS: All those officials of PPPRA who aided and abetted the perpetration of these infractions should be sanctioned according to the Civil Service rules.
1.05 Marketers That Never Applied To PPPRA at All But Were
Given Allocation to Supply Products
Some other Marketers never applied at all to PPPRA but were given allocations to supply products. These categories of marketers are identified, based on information provided by PPPRA. Under the basic rules of contract, PPPRA and the Marketers are in blatant breach of the Guidelines. The marketers are as follows:
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Qty Litres a. Nasaman Oil Services Ltd b. Sifax Oil & Gas Co. Ltd c. Conoil d. AX Energy Ltd RECOMMENDATIONS: 49,691,912 42,928,602 46,664,121 20,048,627
Amount N 3,411,253,193 3,589,063,041 3,027,526,589 1,471,969,643
This infraction would not have occurred if the PPPRA staff had not compromised the system. The relevant officials of PPPRA are recommended to be sanctioned according to Civil Service Rules. 1.06 Marketers With No Tank-Farms, No Through-Put Agreement
With Any Depot But Claimed To Have Discharged Products
Some Marketers were identified as owning no Tank-Farms, had no Through-Put Agreements with any Depots, but claimed to have supplied petroleum products. Under the PPPRA guidelines, no marketer is allowed to participate in the PSF regime except the marketer either has a TankFarm (storage facility) or has agreement with other Depot owners, to ensure the imported products are discharged into an identifiable storage facility before truck-out. Any importer/marketer that did not satisfy this condition cannot be said to have brought in products that can legally qualify for subsidy. These marketers are as follows:-
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Qty Litres a. Lingo oil & Gas Company Ltd b. Nadabo Energy Ltd c. Nasaman Oil Services Ltd 13,939,286 40,608,289 49,691,912
Amount N 1,201,297,922 2,660,902,801 3,441,253,193 1,360,898,638
d. Prudent Energy & Services Ltd 18,318,267 RECOMMENDATIONS:
All subsidy payments to the above-listed marketers identified are hereby recommended to be refunded. This is based on the fact that they did not only infringe the guidelines but the transactions claimed could not be confirmed from further inquests into the Depot reports by PPPRA and NPA import reports. 1.07 Marketers with No Tank-Farm, Had Through-Put Agreements But
Not Confirmed To Have Utilized Same yet Claimed To Have Supplied Products
Some Marketers had no Tank-Farms, had Through-Put Agreements but could not be confirmed to have utilized same yet claimed to have discharged their products elsewhere. Reliance has been placed on PPPRA’s representations to the Committee to confirm that the said marketers did not utilize the facilities they had Thru-Put Agreement with within the period under consideration. It is absolutely difficult to confirm that the marketers listed in the Table below were genuinely involved in
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the importation of quantity of petroleum products claimed under the PSF scheme. RECOMMENDATIONS: All supplies claimed to have been made by the marketers identified under this category were adjudged irregular and unsustainable. The relevant subsidy payments received, having not been legally earned, should be refunded. These categories of marketers are as follows:MARKETERS – NO TANK-FARMS, HAD THRU-PUT AGREEMENT, NEVER USED SAME BUT CLAIMED TO HAVE IMPORTED PRODUCTS UNDER PSF
S/N NAMES OF MARKETERS SUPPLIES CLAIMED BUT UNCONFIRMED 2010 & 2011 DATE OF FIRST THRU-PUT SUBSIDY CLAIMED
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
DOWNSTREAM ENERGY SOURCES DUPORT MARINE ECO-REGEN LTD IMAD OIL AND GAS SETANA ENERGY LTD RYDEN OIL TRADING COM SOMERSET ENERGY SERVICES SULPHUR STREAMS LTD SWIFT OIL TECHNO OIL LTD TONIQUE OIL SERVICES LTD VALCORE ENERGY LTD
TOTAL
LITRES 39,341,145 47,374,819 38,060,916 40,621,597 44,833,464 6,033,043 39,649,669 55,281,456 66,649,190 6,137,738 65,055,054 59,270,240
508,308,331
N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A
N 2,947,780,261 3,555,127,358 3,339,101,218 2,701,002,852 2,791,264,070 451,150,983 2,172,206,037 4,758,693,054 5,062,403,555 547,179,342 3,827,112,622 5,177,393,607
37,330,414,959
2.01 To be able to establish whether or not there were any payments made for volumes of products not brought-in, the Committee made reference to the following reports and representations by PPPRA, Central Bank of
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Nigeria (CBN) and Office of the Accountant-General of the Federation (OAGF): (i) (ii) (iii) (iv) (v) (vi) PMS Volume & Associated Subsidy for 2009 by the Marketers sourced from PPPRA’s presentation. PMS Volume & Associated Subsidy for 2010 by the Marketers sourced from PPPRA’s presentation. PMS Volume & Associated Subsidy for 2011 by the Marketers sourced from PPPRA’s presentation. Statement of Account on Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) Statement of Account on Domestic Excess Crude (Naira) Account Schedule of Payments by CBN under the Sovereign Debt Regime
(vii) Schedule of Direct Deductions made by NNPC. (viii) PPPRA’s submission to the Ad-hoc Committee on the monitoring of the Subsidy Regime. (ix) PPPRA’s document Titled “The Role of Petroleum Products
Pricing Regulatory Agency In The Administration of The Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) Scheme”
2.02 The above documents were subjected to in-depth scrutiny, putting side by side PPPRA’s claims to volumes discharged by the Marketers and NNPC against the actual payments made from the PSF Account, the Domestic Excess Crude (Naira) Account as well as the direct deduction made by NNPC.
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2.03 The following were the findings under Marketers and NNPC respectively: 2.04 THE MARKETERS i. ii. By PPPRA’s representation the Marketers received a subsidy of N680.982 Billion as subsidy for supplying 9,317,145,275 litres of PMS in 2011. Curiously, PPPRA made another presentation that the Marketers were paid N975.896 Billion for supplying 12,488,789,611 litres of PMS in 2011.  Between (i) and (ii) above, PPPRA has confirmed that the sum of N294,914 Billion was paid on 3,171,644,336 litres of PMS that might not have been supplied to the Nigerian market. RECOMMENDATIONS: This anomaly is hereby referred to the Relevant Anti -Corruption Agencies for further investigation.
CONFLICTING FIGURES:
iii.
Analysis of subsidy paid to the Marketers in 2011 by CBN under the Sovereign Debt Note regime shows that the Marketers received the sum of N894.201 Billion as subsidy and not N975.896 Billion as reported by PPPRA.  Between (ii) and (iii), PPPRA appears to have paid an excess of N81.695 Billion over and above CBN’s figure of N894.201 Billion from a yet-to-be identified source. The situation in 2010 and 2009 were a converse of the situation in 2011 as the bank accounts (CBN/SDN) indicated to have
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made payments higher than what PPPRA claimed to have made. This is graphically represented in Table 1 below.
COMPARISON OF SUBSIDY PAID TO MARKETERS PPPRA VS BANK (CBN) PPPRA DETAILS OF ACTUAL PAYMENTS OVERTOTAL PAYMENTS TO PAYMENT TO BE RECOVERY REFUNDABLE MARKETERS BY PSF A/C EXPLAINED BY PPPRA & DEC A/C BY AGF NOT REFLECTED NB NB IN BANK A/C NB NB (PSF) NB
YEAR
2009 129.536 2010 344.393 2011 975.896
297.921 386.920 894.201
168.385 42.527 (81.695) Table
2.766 _ _
171.151 42.527 (81.695)
The situation in 2011, wherein it was deduced that PPPRA may have paid subsidy higher than what the bank reflected, is a pointer to the fact that the official bank accounts disclosed by CBN may not be the only ones used by PPPRA during the subsidy regime, PPPRA was identified to have received payments from PSF account in 2009 and 2010. OVER-RECOVERIES NOT CREDITED TO THE PSF ACCOUNT: j. Part of the funding sources of the PSF Account is over-recovery from marketers. This accrues when product landing cost is lower than the ExDepot price. In 2009, there was an over-recovery of N2.766 Billion. This was expected to have been credited to the PSF Account but was not traceable to the official PSF Account disclosed.
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ii. Furthermore, in the presentation made by Akintola Williams Deloitte it was claimed that the sum of NGN5.27Billion was established as over-recovery in 2009, however, there was no evidence that this money was credited to the PSF Account. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. The office of the Accountant-General of the Federation (OAGF) should account for the sum of N213.678 Billion, being total of excess payments made by it over and above what PPPRA identified as paid in 2009 and 2010. The OAGF is not only responsible for the accounts of the Federation including the PSF and Domestic Crude Account but refused to provide further details on the account when requested to do so during the Public Hearing. 2. Relevant Anti - Corruption Agencies should ensure that the OAGF accounts for the over-recovery figures of NGN 2.766Billion and NGN5.27Billion respectively. 2.05 Conflicting Figures for Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) NNPC had two sources of recovery of its subsidy viz: (i) Direct Deductions from Domestic Crude receipts accruable to the Federation. (ii) Payment by CBN through deduction from Distributable revenues as per the Federation Account Component Statement.
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NNPC’s in its submission claimed to have earned N586 Billion as subsidy from the supply of 7,576,726,157 litres of PMS in 2011. However, by PPPRA’s presentation, NNPC was paid a subsidy of N667.533 Billion for supplying 5,470,007,111 litres of PMS By CBN’s presentation, NNPC was paid the sum of N844.944 Billion as subsidy in 2011. In addition to CBN’s payment of N844.944 Billion as represented on the Federation Account Component Statement, NNPC made a direct deduction of N847.942 Billion as subsidy in 2011, bringing all claims by NNPC on subsidy in 2011 to N1,692.886 Billion (N1.692 Trillion). The above is captured graphically in Table below. Summary of NNPC Subsidy Receipts 2009 – 2011
YEAR PPPRA PRESENTATION NB 2009 2010 2011 261.509 389.027 667.533 BANK + DIRECT DEDUCTION NB 408.255 810.224 1,692.886 OVER PAYMENT TO BE EXPLAINED BY OAGF NB 146.746 421.197 1,025.353
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2.06. FURTHER CONFIRMATION THAT NNPC’S SUBSIDY CLAIM AS REPORTED BY CBN IS DIFFERENT FROM DIRECT DEDUCTIONS BY NNPC
From information available to the Committee, the illegal practice of NNPC’s direct deductions from the Domestic Crude receipts started as far back as 2004. CBN claims that for disclosure purposes, it started reflecting NNPC’s subsidy claims on the Federation Account Component Statement from October 2009. A comparison between what CBN claimed was subsidy to NNPC and what NNPC deducted directly, shows huge differences. This confirms that the two figures could not have emanated from the same source. CBN had no business reporting what NNPC deducted internally. Therefore, CBN’s reported figures cannot be no other than what it paid. The following examples suffice;
(a)
In October 2009, PPPRA confirmed it approved a subsidy of N22.269 Billion. While CBN confirmed it paid NNPC the sum of N21.649 Billion in October 2009 as subsidy, NNPC’s direct deduction was N81.326 Billion in the same month.
(b)
In November, 2009, PPPRA approved a total of N27.666 Billion vide Ref. Nos. A./4/4/229/C.33/IV/1026 of 12th February 2010 for N21,289,621,388.04 and A./4/4/229/C.33/VII/1241 of 31st January 2011 for N6,377,055,615.88. While CBN confirmed paying a subsidy of N25.0 Billion to NNPC in November, 2009, NNPC’s direct deduction was N64.246 Billion.
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YEAR
PAYMENTS OF SUBSIDY TO MARKETERS
INDEPENDENT MARKETERS
NNPC
TOTAL
GRAND TOTAL SUBSIDY PAID
(c)In December, 2009, although CBN’s figure of N35.0 Billion tallied with the direct deduction of N35.0 Billion by NNPC, what PPPRA approved in that month as subsidy was N20.964 Billion. 2.07. PPPRA in its presentation to the House of Representatives had hinted that the noticeable upsurge in subsidy payment in 2011 was due not only to increase in subsidy per litre but also to the computed arrears due NNPC for HHK discharges. This was established from NNPC’s submission to be N284.580 Billion. This payment of subsidy arrears on HHK was an illegality, having been proscribed by a presidential directive in 2009. NNPC was stopped from further collecting subsidy on HHK. The Corporation abided by the Presidential directive but unilaterally reversed the situation without any counter directive or order from the President. Table below summarizes the payments between 2009 to 2011
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PSF A/C
NB
DOMESTIC EXCESS CRUDE NAIRA A/C NB
TOTAL
DIRECT DEDUCTIONS NB
CBN PAYMENT
NB
NB
2009 2010 2011
297.921 160.047 (JanApr) _
_ 221.880 (MayDec) 894.201
297.921 381.927 894.201
(APPENDIX 15)
408.255 407.801 847.942
81.648 402.423 844.944
NB 489.903 810.224 1,692.886
NB 787.824 1,192.151 2,587.087
ACTUAL SUBSIDY PAYMENTS BY THE FEDERATION TO THE MARKETERS AND NNPC: 2009 – 2011
(i)
In 2009, only the Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) Account was operational under the subsidy regime and the marketers were paid a total of N297.921 Billion as subsidy. PPPRA confirmed the payments as N129.536 Billion and by implication an over payment by N168.385 Billion. While NNPC made direct deductions of N408.255 Billion, CBN indicated that it paid NNPC the sum of N81.648 Billion as subsidy. This brings total payment in 2009 to NNPC to N787.824 Billion.
(ii)
In 2010, the PSF Account was used to pay subsidy of N160.047 Billion. Between Jan – April 2010. From May 2010, subsidy payment was made from Domestic excess Crude (Naira) Account (DEC A/C). Between May 2010 to Dec 2010, the sum of N221.880 Billion was indicated as subsidy paid by the CBN to the Marketers. NNPC made direct deduction of N407.801 Billion and received as payment the sum
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of N402.423 Billion from CBN. This brings total payment in 2010 to N1.192.151 Billion. (iii) In 2011, PSF Account had ceased to pay subsidy. CBN paid the sum of N894.201 Billion to the Marketers and N844.944 Billion to NNPC in addition to its direct deduction of N847.942 Billion. This brings total subsidy payment in 2011 to N2.587 Trillion. (iv) Although the N2.587 Trillion excludes unpaid subsidy as at 31st December, 2011, it includes payment in respect of unpaid subsidy as at 31st December 2010 and the arrears on DPK for 2009 and 2010 which were paid in 2011. 2.08 The following Points are Worthy of Note: Based on the subsidy payments to the Marketers alone of N894.201 Billion in 2011, with the demurrage and all other items on the template inclusive, at an average subsidy rate per litre of N77.9, the nation would have received 11,478,831,835 litres of PMS in 2011 or a daily average supply of 31,448,854 litres. This simply means that what was paid to the marketers in 2011 i.e N894.201 Billion was almost enough to satisfy the nation’s PMS needs. 2.09 Actual Payments of subsidy: (i) PPPRA’s representation to the Committee claimed that total subsidy paid in 2011 was N1.348 Trillion.
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(ii) (iii)
CBN in its presentation to the Committee however confirmed total subsidy payment of N1.739 Trillion. The Accountant-General of the Federation informed the Committee that total subsidy paid in 2011 was N1.697 Trillion
However, investigations have revealed that total payments and direct deductions in 2011 in respect of subsidy by the marketers and NNPC, amounted to N2,587.087 Trillion as captured below: NB Payments to Marketers Payments by CBN to NNPC Direct Deductions by NNPC 894.201 844.944 847.942 2,587.087 (iii)In 2010, total payments for subsidy were N1.192 Trillion while that of 2009 was N787.824 Billion. 3.00 DISCREPANCIES IN THE SUPPLIES/DISCHARGES OF
PETROLEUM PRODUCTS AND SUBSIDY 3.01 The Committee tasked itself to specifically identify marketers and the transactions that gave rise to claims to subsidy on products that may not have been brought in. This searchlight on the marketers was informed by the following: 3.02 The Committee identified that the marketers were often awarded superfluous quantities of products to supply but often did not meet the target. This is captured vividly in Table below.
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COMPARISON OF APPROVED QUANTITY BY PPPRA AND DISCHARGES BY MARKETERS
MARKETERS 2009 2010 2011 APPROVED QTY (LITRES) 11,341,507,500 12,410,955,000 13,589,510,000 DISCHARGE/ DELIVERY (LITRES) 5,085,206,983 6,226,586,543 9,317,145,231 UNDER (OVER) DISCHARGE (LITRES) 6,256,300,517 6,184,368,457 4,272,364,769 % UnderDischarge 55.16% 49.8% 31.40%
Table
The information on the above table was extracted from PPPRA’s submission to the House of Representatives. In 2009, PPPRA approved a supply of 11,341,507,500 litres of PMS for the marketers. However, PPPRA confirmed the marketers discharged only 5,085,206,983 litres or 55.16% under-discharge. Despite being aware of the under-performance by the Marketers in 2009 or the defect in its procurement process and management, PPPRA increased the 2010 Approved Deliverables to 12,410,955,000 litres. The Marketers delivered only 6,226,586,543 i.e 49.8% under performance. In spite of the underperformance, there were no crises of product availability throughout 2011. The same ugly trend was maintained by PPPRA in 2011 during which it increased its Approved Quantity to 13,589,510,000 litres but however confirmed a delivery of 9,317,145,231 litres, an under performance by 31.4%. It is clear that PPPRA had no good understanding of effective procurement procedures and management and may have adopted incremental budgeting
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process in determining Approved Quantity without recourse to the performance in preceding periods. RECOMMENDATIONS: The PPPRA staff in charge of procurement between 2009 to 2011 should be reprimanded and punished according to Civil Service rules. 3.03 NNPC AND PPPRA APPROVALS While the marketers were provided with significant slack between Quantity Allocated and Discharged and consistently under-supplied, PPPRA however represented that NNPC continually over-discharged. This is represented in Table below.
Comparison of Approved Quantity by PPPRA and Discharges by NNPC
YEAR 2009 APPROVED QTY (LITRES) 8,021,862,000 8,897,535,000 4,559,400,000 DISCHARGES/DELIVERY (LITRES) 8,351,227,182 9,507,712,032 5,470,007,109 UNDER(OVER) DISCHARGES (LITRES) (329,365,182) (610,177,032) (910,607,109)
Table
NNPC has access to the Federation Account and was at liberty to collect whatever subsidy it desires while the marketers could only rely on over bloating of volume supplied or not supplied at all to earn subsidy, hence the searchlight on marketers’ transactions.
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3.04 Ascertainment of Unverifiable Claims to Subsidy: Before the commencement of the public hearing, the Committee through Newspaper and TV advertorials, requested all Marketers who partook in the subsidy regime to submit details of their transactions with PPPRA between 2006 to 2011. Formal letters of invitation to the marketers and PPPRA included a format of the information required. Submissions by some of the companies were explicit and clear as they conformed to the format provided. Others simply supplied a maze of uncoordinated returns that failed to provide the specific details required. The information sought from the marketers include a schedule of all imports made and subsidy received between 2006 to 2011 with copies of the following documents attached:  Schedule of Transactions  Form M  Letters of Credit  Bill of Lading  Certificate of discharge ETC. 3.05 The PPPRA obliged the Committee with its request. To be able to appraise the submissions of the marketers as to the veracity of their claims, PPPRA’s submission titled “SUMMARY OF IMPORTS BY MARKETERS AND PAYMENTS UNDER THE PETROLEUM SUPPORT FUND (PSF) SCHEME” was sorted to (i) Company Profile of Supplies and (ii) Depot Report, respectively.
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3.06 The Committee further requested and obtained Reports on Imports between 2006 and 2011 from Nigeria Ports Authority (NPA) as a third layer of check on the claims to importation of petroleum products. 3.07 Based on the above platform, all claims to importation of petroleum products and subsidy thereon, by the Independent marketers were subjected to painstaking scrutiny and the findings are as follows; FINDINGS: 3.08 Some claims to importation of petroleum products could not be verified as the Depots into which they purportedly discharged the products could not confirm receipt. 3.09 In some instances, there were wide gap between the dates the importer claimed to have discharged its products and the date a receipt was confirmed from the Depot. 3.10 Some claim to volumes discharged differed significantly from the volume received at Depots. For example a marketer claims to have discharged a higher quantity in a particular Depot than what the Depot confirmed it received. The reverse was the case in some other instances where Marketers claimed lower volume of discharge than what the Depot acknowledged receiving. 3.11 Some Marketers claimed to have discharged unspecified volumes of products at two to four different Depots from one consignment. 3.12 Some refused and/or ignored to disclose the date on which they discharged their products or the Tank-Farms they discharged into.
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3.13 Some companies refused to disclose the names of the vessels that discharged the petroleum products purportedly imported by them. 3.14 Some claims to importation of petroleum products could not be confirmed from NPA’s schedule of imports. 3.15 Some companies imported DPK ostensibly under a supply arrangement with NNPC, but declared same as PMS based on which they were paid subsidy. 3.16 All the claims to product supply and subsidy thereon were critically analyzed and reviewed. RECOMMENDATIONS:  Discharges that suffered one or more of the above infractions were adjudged not sustainable and therefore not good enough to attract any subsidy. The disqualified claims to subsidy amount to a sum of N230.184Billion. The associated PMS volumes of 3,262,960,225 litres are therefore deductible from the annual mass volume, with a view to determining the appropriate volume of consumption. These defective transactions should be further investigated by the Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies to ensure that all those who collected unmerited subsidy are made to refund the amounts collected.
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SCHEDULE OF DISALLOWED CLAIMS TO DISCHARGES AND SUBSIDY 2010-2011
S/NO 1 NNPC NAME OF MARKETERS VOLUME DEDUCTIBLE LITRES SUBSIDY REFUNDABLE N
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26
ACORN PLC ALMINNUR RESOURCES LTD ANOSYKE GROUP OF COMPANIES LTD ASCON OIL & GAS COMPANY AVANT GARDE ENERGY A - Z PETROLEUM CAH RESOURCES ASSOCIATION LTD CHANNEL OIL & PETROLEUM LTD CRUST ENERGY LTD DOWNSTREAM ENERGY SOURCE LTD DOZZY OIL AND GAS LTD DUPORT MARINE LTD ECO-REGEN LTD EURAFIC OIL AND COASTAL SERVICES LTD FIRST DEEP WATER DISCOVERY LTD FRADRO INTERNATIONAL LTD FRESH SYNERGY LTD HEYDEN PETROLEUM IBAFON OIL LTD IMAD OIL & GAS LTD INTEGRATED OIL & GAS INTEGRATED RESOURCES LTD IPMAN INVESTMENT LTD KNIGHTSBRIDGE LINETRALE OIL SUPPLY AND TRADING COMPANY
140,894,149.00 46,918,888.00 15,769,795.00 64,745,352.00 19,470,988.00 130,721,532.00 323,005.00 28,966,976 13,301,936.00 39,341,145.00 19,081,051.00 47,374,819.00 38,060,916.00 42,442,180.00 12,244,946.00 45,808,707.00 19,350,390.00 40,441,260.00 20,134,910.00 40,621,597.00 190,846,561.00 13,395,101.00 113,252,677.00 62,705,372.00 18,015,790.00
8,514,900,513.00 2,543,800,931.00 1,318,443,535.00 4,451,932,090.00 1,154,824,298.00 8,065,557,648.00 24,206,727.00 622,518,071 1,192,651,581.00 2,947,780,261.00 1,587,298,801.00 3,555,127,358.00 3,339,101,218.00 3,868,147,024.00 932,207,739.00 3,661,643,268.00 1,417,029,059.00 3,345,455,733.00 1,474,479,459.00 2,701,002,852.00 13,252,055,429.00 1,166,486,995.00 7,538,589,178.00 1,685,869,439.00 1,213,903,930.00
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27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53 54 55 56
LINGO OIL & GAS COMPANY LTD LLOYDS ENERGY LTD LOTTOJ OIL & GAS LTD MAIZUBE PETROLEUM LTD MATRIX ENERGY OIL & GAS LTD MENOL OIL & GAS LTD MOB INTEGRATED SERVICES MOBIL OIL NIGERIA PLC MUT-HASS NADABO ENERGY LTD NASAMAN OIL SERVICES LTD NATICEL PETROLEUM LTD NEPAL OIL & GAS SERV. LTD NIPCO PLC OAKFIELD SYNERGY NETWORK LTD OBAT OIL & PETROLEUM LTD OCEAN ENERGY OILBATH NIGERIA LTD ONTARIO NIGERIA LTD ORIGIN OIL & GAS LTD PETROTRADE ENERGY LTD P.O.N SPECIALISED SERVICES PHOENIX OIL COMPANY LIMITED PRUDENT ENERGY & SERVICES LTD ROCKY ENERGY LTD RYDEN OIL LTD SEA PETROLEUM & GAS CO. LTD SEDEC ENERGY LTD SETANA ENERGY LTD SHORELINK & GAS SERVICES LTD
13,939,286.00 62,144,967.00 19,019,719.00 63,474,066.00 150,999,206.00 65,226,359.00 71,716,695.00 47,223,884.00 12,895,905.00 40,608,289.00 49,691,912.00 66,768,117.00 30,975,102.00 126,161,617.00 13,798,245.00 16,707,541.00 18,999,680.00 13,414,605.00 61,927,588.00 39,368,193.00 12,088,200.00 17,985,850.00 24,201,544.00 18,318,267.00 19,837,274.00 6,033,043.00 59,841,476.00 19,915,805.00 44,833,464.00 63,767,177
1,201,297,922.00 4,370,512,172.00 1,427,429,910.00 5,509,407,903.00 11,211,040,786.00 4,333,348,489.00 5,066,786,851.00 2,660,968,597.00 1,102,084,041.00 2,660,902,801.00 3,441,253,193.00 5,276,169,320.00 2,353,911,978.00 7,838,353,057.00 988,920,219.00 1,321,256,085 1,778,180,051.00 1,019,644,138.00 4,248,727,148.00 4,141,367,099.00 908,805,371.00 1,413,501,932 1,827,838,204.00 1,360,898,638.00 1,620,110,167.00 451,150,983.00 1,019,571,609.00 845,226,771.00 2,791,264,070.00 5,056,009,002
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57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71
SHIELD PETROLEUM COMPANY NIGERIA LTD SIFAX OIL AND GAS COMPANY LTD SIRUS ENERGY RESOURCES LTD SOMERSET ENERGY SERVICES LTD STONEBRIDGE OIL LTD SULPHUR STREAMS LTD SWIFT OIL LTD TAURUS OIL & GAS LTD TECHNO OIL LTD TONIQUE OIL SERVICES LTD TOP OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENT COMPANY LTD TOTAL NIGERIA PLC VALCORE ENERGY LTD VIVENDI ENERGY LTD YANATY PETROCHEMICALS NIGERIA LTD
26,409,962.00 42,928,602.00 21,505,864 39,649,669.00 20,187,353.00 55,281,456.00 66,649,190.00 84,028,035.00 6,137,738.00 65,055,054.00 98,806,004.00 38,269,427.00 113,176,522.00 13,279,490.00 75,482,740.00
1,502,198,610.00 3,589,063,041.00 5,056,009,002.00 2,172,206,037.00 1,784,158,258.00 4,758,693,054.00 5,062,403,555.00 6,472,821,001.00 547,179,342.00 3,827,112,622.00 7,367,662,306.00 1,931,075,306.00 8,709,548,082.00 1,127,773,642.00 4,682,342,275.00
TOTAL
3,262,960,225
230,184,605,691.00
4.00 PROLIFERATION OF BANK ACCOUNTS UNDER THE SUBSIDY REGIME AND ITS ADVERSE EFFECT ON DUE PROCESS 4.01 The biggest draw back on the Subsidy Regime was the inability of the authorities to designate a bank account exclusively for the Payment of Subsidy. Neither the PSF account nor the Excess Domestic Crude Naira account was designated as such accounts. These two accounts were used to make all sorts of payments including payments to FGN, States, Local Governments and even some government agencies.
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4.02 Another issue is the Account Names assigned to the two accounts. Although PSF is in the Name of PPPRA, some payments were indicated to have been made to PPPRA itself. We had earlier provided a schedule showing such payments totalling N158.470 Billion in 2009 and N157.894 Billion in 2010 as examples only. PPPRA has not provided details of such payments which may provide lead to the existence of another Subsidy Account.
PAYMENTS PPPRA MADE TO ITSELF FROM PETROLEUM SUPPORT FUND ACCOUNT NO. 0020196441019 BETWEEN 1ST JANUARY 2009 TO 31ST DECEMBER 2010
2009
S/NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 DATE 17/4/09 17/4/09 28/5/09 28/5/09 18/6/09 14/8/09 8/9/09 8/9/09 8/9/09 25/9/09 10/11/09 3/12/09 4/12/09 4/12/09 /12/09 REFERENCE MANDATE LETTER A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/02/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/01/09 DD 25/05 DD 25/05 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/05/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/06/09 LT DD 7/8/9 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/09/09 LT DD 7/9/9 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/07/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/08/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/09/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/10/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/11/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/13/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/12/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/14/09 AMOUNT N 17,032,079,380.44 31,100,560,536.47 3,609,717,832.00 12,855,314,944.59 2,808,534,935.91 12,452,344,556.45 1,439,748,235.91 2,760,497,832.69 5,434,130,891.13 21,941,919,119.72 21,164,880,263.60 3,402,271,618.65 2,391,303,515.25 18,835,734,436.71 173,508,297.55
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16
4/12/09
A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/15/09
1,068,339,778.73
TOTAL 158,470,886,175.80
2010
DATE S/NO 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 7/1/10 7/1/10 13/1/10 21/1/10 26/1/10 9/2/10 9/2/10 15/2/10 15/2/10 15/2/10 17/3/10 17/3/10 17/3/10 25/3/10 25/3/10 25/3/10 7/4/10 7/4/10 8/4/10 8/4/10
A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/19/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/18/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/17/09 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/20/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/21/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/21/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/22/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/26/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/25/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/24/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/29/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/28/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/27/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/32/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/30/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/31/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/32/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/34/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/35/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/37/10 REFERENCE MANDATE LETTER
AMOUNT N 1,474,668,024.16 16,730,892,239.37 11,927,943,973.09 37,100,750,229.17 908,949,361.41 26,565,449.85 1,738,498,374.44 114,099,550.05 2,845,952,244.05 24,536,024,428.77 47,874,228.90 1,260,688,027.70 11,116,461,519.67 5,729,189.40 2,732,441,384.98 150,868,654.20 5,295,665,694.74 21,449,191.05 2,813,701,728.67 4,882,015,763.71
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21 22 23 24 25 26
8/4/10 21/5/10 28/5/10 28/5/10 10/6/10 14/6/10
A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/36/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/33/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/38/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/38/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/40/10 A3/7/408/C.28/VOL.1/41/10 TOTAL
3,496,162,718.06 564,828,697.65 6,146,266,172.64 7,192,301,488.86 12,658,210,203.81 2,105,309,295.62 157,894,317,834.02
Source: PSF A/C as submitted by CBN to the Ad-hoc Committee
4.03 The Excess Domestic Crude Naira Account is in the Name of Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation (NNPC) as the account holder. The OAGF should explain who authorized payments from this account that had accommodated varied and unrelated payments and has disbursed over N2.5 Trillion between 2007 and Jan. 2012. 4.04 The PPPRA was established to administer and monitor the subsidy regime from 2006. It was expected that NNPC should come under the supervision of PPPRA that should vet and authorize NNPC’s claims to subsidy. It was therefore an aberration that the Excess Domestic Crude Naira Account was established or opened in 2007 in the name of NNPC for the payment of subsidy and other payments. This account should be in the name of FGN/OAGF for purposes of subsidy. 4.05 The Accountant General of the Federation who had the statutory responsibility to manage and reconcile the account to ensure probity and
174
accountability did not appear to have carried out these duties and responsibilities. 4.06 A comparison between what the CBN accounts registered as payment of subsidy between 2009 and 2010 and what the OAGF registered as payment in the respective years showed very wide margins. See Table below: SUMMARY OF SUBSIDY PAID IN 2009, 2010 & 2011 ASREPRESENTED BY CBN, PPPRA & AGF
2009 NB Actual Subsidy Per CBN (A) Subsidy as per PPPRA (B) Subsidy as per AGF (C) (A - C) (A – B) 706,176 463.576 383.544 323.095 243.063 2010 NB 794.721 673.006 744.773 49.944 121.715 2011 NB 1,739.702 1,348.515 1,697.592 42.110 391.187 TOTAL NB 3,241.062 2,485.097 2,825.913 415.149 755.965
Table
NOTE: i. It is obvious from the above disparities and different figures, especially between actual payments by CBN and what the OAGF presented, that the subsidy account was not properly managed and coordinated. ii. The actual subsidy would be higher if the Discount NNPC granted itself were taken into account. These were; 2009: N65 Billion; 2010: N24 Billion and 2011: N18 Billion. iii. As at 31st December 2011, the total unpaid subsidy to marketers was estimated at about N120 Billion out of this, a total of N84.3 Billion has
175
been paid to the Marketers between 18th January and 3rd February 2012, while NNPC claims to have outstanding payments for PMS of about N150 billion. RECOMMENDATIONS: 1. The Accountant-General of the Federation should identify the accounts into which PPPRA transferred a total of N158.470 Billion in 2009 and N157.894 Billion in 2010. 2. He should identify the persons who benefited from the payments. 3.0. SUSPICIOUS PAYMENTS FROM PSF ACCOUNT: 1. It was observed that 128 payments of equal amounts of NGN999, 000,000million totalling NGN127.872Billion was made between 12th and 13th January, 2009. This manner of payments raises very serious suspicion as to likelihood of fraud and financial malpractices. 2. These payments could not have been to marketers as at that time there were not up to 127 marketers and it was inconceivable that the same marketer would have brought in the same volume, on the same day and be entitled to equal and the same payments.
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RECOMMENDATION: 1. The OAGF should be further investigated/prosecuted on the one hundred and twenty-eight payments (128) of equal amount of N999, 000,000 totalling N127.872 Billion between 12th January 2009 and 13th January, 2009. 6.00 CONSUMPTION LEVEL
6.01 To establish the consumption level, various volumes of consumption put forward by PPPRA were considered. These included 6.02 Actual volumes on which PPPRA paid subsidy in 2009 to 2011. This was found to have been corrupted with discharges that could not be substantiated. 6.03 Volumes derivable from Forex sold by CBN for the importation of petroleum products in the respective years 2009 to 2011. This option although excluded the defects of over bloating of supplies but suffered some defects of some marketers who obtained Forex but did not import petroleum products while some imported products without obtaining Forex from CBN. 6.04 The volume provided by PPPRA, considered reasonable basis for the establishment of Consumption level without ignoring the position
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ascertained in (5.02) above. Lower figures between actual basis of subsidy payment were preferred. These form the basis for the establishment of consumption levels hereunder presented as Table DETERMINATION OF DAILY CONSUMPTION
PPPRA Actual Basis For Subsidy Payment To Marketers PPPRA Confirmed Discharge of PMS By NNPC Annual Consumption (1 + 2) Average Daily Consumption (3 ÷ 365) 1 2 3 4 2009 (LITRES) 5,085,206,983 8,351,227,184 13,436,434,167 36,812,148 2010 (LITRES) 6,226,586,543 7,576,926,157 13,803,512,700 37,817,843 2011 (LITRES) 9,317,145,231 5,470,007,109 14,787,152,340 40,512,746
Table
1. Availability of Products: The Committee examined different options of ensuring the availability of the product to Nigerian markets and hereby presents the following available options, namely:
Allowance of 445,000 barrels per day for local consumption.
The Country is allowed a total of 445,000bpd for local consumption. This type of allowance is given to all OPEC member countries and their respective governments sell it to its citizens at international price like Nigeria, or at various levels of subsidy. The following is an analysis of the effect of a proper application of the allowance should have on the Nigerian products availability and supply.
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i. Supply of Products by NNPC from the 445,000barrels of crude per day for local consumption at international market price:
A YIELD ANALYSIS OF 445,000 BARRELS PER DAY CRUDE OIL ALLOCATION TO NNPC TO REFINE FOR LOCAL CONSUMPTION
AYIELD ANALYSIS AT CURRENT53%REFINING CAPACITY OF LOCAL REFINERIES OPERATED BY NNPC
SN PRODUCT LITRE PER BARRE L % IN A BARRE L OPEN MARKE T PRICE (=N=) TOTAL LITRES OUTPU T FROM 235,00 0 bpd (A) DAILY CONSU MPTION LITRES (B) DIFFERENC E (A – B) CONVERSIO N OF OTHER PRODUCTS TO PMS CUMMUL A TIVE QTY OF PMS MLPD
(Product Price X Quantity / PMS price)
(4.39) ML LOCAL PRODUCTION 5.61 ML MPORT 4.39 ML LOCAL PRODUCTION 13.83 ML IMPORT 26.17 ML N165 x 8.97ML = N1.48BN N141 x 2.24ML = N316M N107 x 4.86ML = N520M
1.
DPK
23.85
15%
151
5.61 ML
10.00 ML
5.61 ML 10.00 ML
2.
PMS
58.83
37%
141
13.83 ML
40.00 ML
(26.17 ML)
13.88 ML 40.00 ML
3.
AGO
38.16
24%
165
8.97 ML
12.00 ML
(3.03) ML
4.
LPG
9.54
6%
141
2.24 ML
0.62 ML
1.62 ML
5.
FO
20.67
13%
107
4.86 ML
2.31 ML
2.55 ML
6 7.
OTHERS IMPORTS
7.95
5%
1.87 ML 210,000bpd X N18,400 = N= 3.864BN (N160/$) ($115 XN160 = N18,400),
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TOTAL
159 L
100%
37.3 8 ML
NB: 47% of the allocation, 210,000bpd could be swapped or sold at international rate (currently @ $115/ barrel) to source the required PMS and DPK for consumption and reserve
A YIELD ANALYSIS OF 445,000 BARRELS PER DAY CRUDE OIL ALLOCATION TO NNPC TO REFINE FOR LOCAL CONSUMPTION TABLE B: A YIELD ANALYSIS AT53%REFINING CAPACITY OF LOCAL REFINERIES OPERATED BY NNPC
TOTAL LITRES OUTPUT FROM 235,000 bpd E Cx 235,000
S/N0 A
PRODU CT B
LITRE PER BARREL C
PROD UCT %
OPEN MAR KET PRICE (=N=) D
DAILY CONSUMP TION LITRES F
DIFFERENCE (E - F) G E-F
CONVERSION OF OTHER PRODUCTS TO PMS (Product Price x Quantity/ PMS Price) H { (D3 xE2) /D2 }
CUMMUL ATIVE QTY OF PMS I
1
DPK/KE RO
23.85
15%
151
5,604,750 13,825,05 0 8,967,600 2,241,900 4,857,450 1,868,250
10,000,000
(4,395,250)
-
-
2 3 4 5 6
PMS AGO/DI ESEL LPG FO OTHERS
58.83 38.16 9.54 20.67 7.95
37% 24% 6% 13% 5%
141 165 141 107
40,000,000 12,000,000 620,000 2,310,000
(26,174,950) (3,032,400) 1,621,900 2,547,450 1,868,250
7
IMPORT S
37,365,00 0 LITRES PER
-
210,000bpd@$115=$24 ,150,000 @N160/$ = N3,864,000,000
TOTAL
159.00 LITRES PER
100%
180
BARREL
BARREL
***PPPRA YIELD CHART
ANALYSIS OF YIELD AT 53% REFINING CAPACITY OF NNPC REFINERIES IN NIGERIA 1. NNPC refines 445,000 bpd at 53% that is 235,000 bpd and, SWAP or SALE or process OFFSHORE the 210,000 bpd i.e. 47% of 445,000 bpd in import products. 2. Based on 235,000 bpd NNPC produces locally the following quantities ; S/No. 1 2 3 4 5 Product DPK PMS AGO LPG FO Production 5.61 MLPD 13.83 8.97 2.24 4.86 40 12 0.62 2.31 Consumption 10 MLPD Difference 4.39 MLPD 26.17 3.03 1.62 2.55
3. In the circumstance, NNPC has to source additional DPK and PMS with the balance of 210,000 bpd using the following arrangements:a. Swap b. Offshore Processing c. Outright sale of crude oil 4. If NNPC sells the 210,000 bpd at international rate, currently $115 / barrel or N18,600 / barrel @ N160/$ and the surplus of the other product NNPC would realize :181
i. ii. iii.
210,000 bpd @ N18,400/barrel = 3.864 billion LPG 1.62ML @ N141/litre FO 2.55 ML @ N107/litre Total Proceeds = 228 million = 273 million N4.365 billion
5. NNPC has to import additional DPK and PMS to achieve 10 MLPD and 40 MLPD respectively. The cost for that is :DPK 4.39 ML @ N151/Litre = N663 million PMS 26.17 ML @ N141/Litre = N3.670 billion Total Cost N4.353 billion 6. Therefore, from the proceeds of sales of 210,000 bpd, surplus of LPG and FO in (4) above NNPC can import the additional DPK and PMS in (5) above and have some surplus:N4.365 bn – N4.353 bn 1. TAX ISSUES: i. The Committee discovered in the course of its investigations that tax compliance was not made a major aspect of the prequalification of Companies that participated in the PSF Scheme. ii. At the behest of the Committee, the Federal Inland Revenue Service (FIRS) provided the names of companies that participated in the PSF Scheme and which were classified as tax defaulters. = N12 million
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S/N0 COMPANY NAME 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10. 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 A - Z PETRO PRODUCTS ACORN PLC ALMINNUR RESOURCES LTD AMG PETRO ENERGY LTD ANOSKE GROUP OF CO. LTD ASB INVESTMENT COY ASCON OIL COY AVANT GARDE ENERGY LTD AX ENERGY LTD CAPITAL OIL AND GAS (UNDER FIRS INVESTIGATION) BRILA ENERGY LTD CEOTI LTD CRUST ENERGY LTD DOWNSTREAM ENERGY SOURCES LTD ETERNA OIL FRADRO INTERNATIONAL LTD HONEYWELL OIL AND GAS LTD IMAD OIL AND GAS LTD INTEGRATED OIL AND GAS LTD INTEGRATED OIL RESOURCES LTD KNIGHTSBRIDGE LINGO OIL AND GAS LLOYDS NIG LTD LUBCON LTD
183
25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45
.
LUMEN SKIES LTD MAIZUBE PETROLEUM LTD MENOL OIL AND GAS LTD MOB INTEGRATED SERVICES MUT HASS PETROLEUM LTD NADABO ENERGY LTD NATICEL PETROLEUM LTD OBAT OIL AND PETROLEUM LTD OCEAN ENERGY TRADING & SERVICES OWA OIL AND GAS PETRO TRADE ENERGY LTD PRUDENT ENERGY & RESOURCES LTD RYDEN OIL COY LTD SHIELD PETROLEUM OIL NIG LTD SIFAX OIL AND GAS COY STONEBRIDGE OIL LTD SWIFT OIL LTD TAURUS OIL AND GAS TRIQUEST ENERGY LTD VIVENOI ENERGY NIG LTD YANATY PETROCHEMICAL LTD
iv. The PSF Guidelines must be revised to make Tax compliance a mandatory pre-qualification requirement for all participants under the Scheme.
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CHAPTER 7 GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS Based on the facts, issues and investigative interactions, the Committee hereby makes the following recommendations for the consideration and approval of the House. 1. From the findings of this Committee the consumption level for 2011 is estimated at 31.5 million litres per day. However, in 2012 marginal increment of 1.5 million litres a day is recommended in order to take care of unforeseen circumstances, bringing it to 33 million litres per day. And to maintain a strategic reserve, an additional average of seven (7) million litres per day (or 630million litres per Quarter) for the first quarter of 2012 only is recommended. Thus, PPPRA is to use 40 million litres of PMS in the first quarter as its maximum ordering quantity per day. In subsequent quarters PMS daily ordering quantity should be 33 million litres per day. For Kerosene, the Committee recommends a daily ordering quantity of 9 million litres. 2. With regards to the 445,000bpd allocation to NNPC to refine for local consumption, the Committee established that the allocation is sufficient to provide the nation with forty million litres per day for PMS and Ten million litres of HHK.
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The above can be achieved conveniently through;  SWAP arrangement,  Offshore processing, excess from the local refining capacity of 53%. Therefore there is no reason for government to grant subsidy importation to any other marketer. Even though we have quoted 40 million litres as a liberal figure, in the course of monitoring the implementation of the subsidy regime the actual daily consumption will then be determined. 3. The NNPC should refund to the Federation Account, the sum of N310,414,963,613 (Three hundred and ten billion, four hundred and fourteen million, nine hundred and sixty three thousand, six hundred and thirteen naira only) paid to it illegally as subsidy for kerosene contrary to the Presidential Directive of July 29th, 2009 withdrawing subsidy on the product. 4. The Committee recommends that the NNPC should be unbundled to make its operations more efficient and transparent, and this we believe can also be achieved through the passage of a well drafted and comprehensive Petroleum Industry Bill. The Committee  Outright sale of the 445,000bpd and or partial sale of the
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therefore urges the speedy drafting and submission of the bill to the National Assembly. 5. The Committee wishes to recommend that the House do direct for the auditing of the NNPC to determine its solvency. This was as a result of plethora of claims of indebtedness and demands for payments by NNPC’s debtors which, if not well handled, will not only affect the entire economy of Nigeria, but also the supply and distribution of petroleum products. Examples: Nigeria Customs Service Nigeria Ports Authority Trafigura et al = = = N46 billion N6 billion $3.5 billion
6. The House should direct the NNPC to stop any form of deduction not captured in the Appropriation Act before remittance to the Federation Accounts, and the Corporation should submit its transactions to the operational Guidelines of the Subsidy Scheme. 7. NNPC Retail, Independent Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria (IPMAN) and Major Oil Marketers Association of Nigeria (MOMAN) should be the outlets for the distribution of Kerosene to ensure availability and affordability of the product to Nigerians.
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8. The NNPC should also refund to the Federation Account the sum of NGN285.098Billion being over-deductions as against PPPRA approvals for 2011. The Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies should further investigate the Corporation for deductions for the years 2009 and 2010. 9. As postulated earlier in this report, data provided by NNPC and CBN tends to suggest that for 2009, 2010, and 2011, NNPC deducted subsidy payments from two different accounts. It is the recommendation of this Committee that Relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies conduct thorough investigations into this matter and where it is established that double withdrawals were made, the extra amounts should be paid back to the Treasury and those involved prosecuted.
10.
The Management and Board
of the NNPC should be
completely overhauled and all those involved in the following infractions be further investigated and prosecuted by the Relevant Anti -Corruption Agencies:
a. Payment of N285.098 Billion in excess of the PPPRA recommended figure for 2011 b. Subsidy deductions of N310,414,963,613 for kerosene against a Presidential Directive c. Direct deductions from funds meant for the Federation Account in contravention of Section 162 of the Nigerian Constitution
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d. Illegal granting of price differential (discounts) of crude oil price per barrel to NNPC to the tune of N108.648Billion from 2009-2011.
11. The relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies should carry out a
due-diligence investigation to determine the total demurrage payments and outstanding incurred by NNPC for the period 2009 2011. 12. Under the PSF Scheme, importers especially NNPC should be
mandated to patronize Nigerian Flagged vessels provided they produce the standard safety and sea-worthiness certificates in tune with international best practices. 13. All the payments which the PPPRA made to itself from the PSF
account in excess of the approved administrative charges which were due to it under the Template should be recovered and paid back into the Fund. The officials involved in this infraction should be further investigated/prosecuted by the relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies. These confirmed illegal payments were the sum of NGN156.455Billion in 2009, and the sum of NGN155.824Billion in 2010, a total sum of NGN312,279Billion. 14. All staff of PPPRA and DPR involved in the
a. processing of Applications by importers, and
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b. verification, confirmation and payment for imported products by Importers and NNPC should be investigated/prosecuted by Anti- Corruption Agencies for negligence, collusion and fraud. 15. The Executive Secretaries of the PPPRA who were the
accounting officers, and under whose watch these abuses were perpetrated that led to the Government losing billions of naira, should be held liable. Therefore, we strongly recommend that those who served as Executive Secretaries of PPPRA from January 2009 to October 2011 should be further investigated/prosecuted by relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies. This should also include GM Field Services, ACDO/Supervisor-Ullage Team 1, and ACDO/SupervisorUllage Team 2 within the same period, for their roles in the management of the ullaging under the subsidy scheme. 16. The Chairman of the Board of PPPRA from 2009 – 2011, and
the entire Members of the board during the period are hereby reprimanded and their decision which opened the floodgate for the Bazaar is condemned in the strongest terms. 17. It is hereby recommended that Mr President should
reorganize the Ministry of Petroleum Resources to make it more effective in carrying out the much needed reforms in the oil and gas sector.
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18.
Given the large and complex nature of the Ministry of
Petroleum Resources, the Committee recommends that two ministers should be appointed to take charge of the upstream and downstream. 19. The current template being used by PPPRA in computing and
paying PSF is full of in-built prices for wastages and inefficiencies (eg. Lightering exercise, demurrage) that could be plugged to save the Nation’s scarce resources. revision of the template. 20. Henceforth the PPPRA margin of error on the payment We therefore recommend the
Template for ascertaining allowable volumes on imported products should not be more than +/-5% as against the current +/- 10% 21. The PPPRA should provide the Nigerian Navy and NIMASA
advance copies of allocation and vessel arrival notification documents to enable the Navy monitor, track and interdict vessels seeking to avoid Naval certification. 22. The Executive Secretary of PPPRA 2009 – February, 2011
should be investigated and punished for the official recklessness he exhibited in the implementation of the Board decision to reverse the qualification for participation in the scheme. The allocation/approvals to import products given to thirty-five (35)
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Companies before their formal registration with PPPRA testify to this. Companies that lack the required competence and expertise to import petroleum products and even those who did not meet up with the agreed standards were also awarded large chunks of the allocation, an act that culminated in huge loss of resources to the nation. Many Companies under his watch who had neither depots nor through-put agreement were allowed to participate in the Scheme contrary to the revised eligibility guidelines. 23. The practice whereby PPPRA as a regulator in the petroleum
downstream sector being supervised by the Ministry of Petroleum Resources whose Minister is the Chairman of the Board of NNPC (a major importer/participant in the PSF scheme) negates the principles of checks and balances and international best practices. The Committee therefore recommends that the regulatory capacity of PPPRA be strengthened and the National Assembly should commence the process of amending the Act to make the Agency autonomous. 24. The PPPRA should, within two weeks of the adoption of this
Report, conduct a performance assessment of ALL Companies involved in the PSF scheme and publish such reports. 25. The Committee is firm in its view that if any petroleum
product is deserving of subsidy, HHK should enjoy a pride of place.
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It therefore recommends the immediate reinstatement of subsidy for Kerosene not later than second quarter, 2012 at pump price of N50 per Litre. 26. The Committee recommends that the sum of
NGN557.70Billion should be provided for as Subsidy in the 2012 Appropriation Act, while the sum of N249.006B should be provided as subsidy for HHK (Kerosene). Evidently, 445,000 bpd allocation to NNPC is sufficient to provide the nation with 40 MLPD PMS, 10 MLPD HHK, 8.97 MLPD AGO, 0.62 MLPD LPG and 2.31 MLPD of FO at the current NNPC refining capacity of 53%. It is only AGO that daily consumption in full could not be achieved. Since AGO has been deregulated, other marketers can make up for the 3.03 MLPD shortfalls. 27. The Committee recommends that FIRS should follow up on
the companies listed earlier to pay their taxes with due penalties in line with the provisions of the Companies Income Tax Act. 28. The PSF Guidelines should be revised to make Tax compliance
a mandatory pre-qualification requirement for all participants under the Scheme.
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29.
Marketers who obtained FOREX but did not import petroleum
products should be referred to the relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies with a view to verifying what they used the FOREX for:
THOSE WHO OBTAINED FOREX BUT DID NOT IMPORT PETROLEUM PRODUCTS S/N NAMES OF MARKETERS 2010 2011 $ $ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 BUSINESS VENTURES NIG LTD EAST HORIZON GAS CO. LTD EMADEB ENERGY POKAT NIG. LTD. SYNOPSIS ENTERPRISES LTD ZENON PET & GAS LTD. CARNIVAL ENERGY OIL LTD CROWNLINES ICE ENERGY PETROLEUM TRADING LTD INDEX PETROLEUM AFRICA RONAD OIL & GAS W/A SERENE GREENFIELD LTD SUPREME & MITCHELLES TRIDAX ENERGY LTD ZAMSON GLOBAL RES. TOTAL 22,927,339.96 20,735,910.81 6,606,094.30 3,147,956.19 51,449,977.47 232,975,385.13 337,842,663.86
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51,089.57 4,756,274.94 2,131,166.32 6,438,849.64 4,813,272.00 4,813,360.75 16,947,000.00 15,900,000.00 8,916,750.00 64,767,763.22
30.
The following Companies that participated in the Scheme and
refused to appear before the Committee and never submitted the required documents as was repeatedly announced during the hearing are to refund the various sums against their names. It is believed that these companies deliberately refused to appear because they had something to hide. The relevant Anti- Corruption Agencies should ensure full recovery:
S/N 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 18. NAME OF COMPANY Mut-Hass Petroleum Ltd Nepal Oil and Gas Service Oilbath Nigeria Techno Oil Ltd Somerset Energy Services Stonebridge Oil Limited Mobil Oil Nigeria AX Energy Limited CAH Resources Association Limited Crust Energy Limited Fresh Synergy Limited Ibafon Oil Limited Lottoj Oil and Gas Limited Oakfield Synergy Network Limited Petro Trade Energy Limited Prudent Energy & Service Limited Rocky Energy Limited TOTAL AMOUNT (N) 1,102,084,041.30 2,353,911,979.10 1,019,644,138.97 1,036,514,387.08 3,015,221,487.94 1,784,158,258.14 14,934,371,661.76 1,471,969,643.31 1,052,466,415.28 1,192,651,581.76 1,417,029,059.70 4,687,730,540.46 1,427,429,910.95 988,920,219.15 1,471,027,874.73 1,360,898,638.10 1,620,110,167.58 41,936,140,005.31
31.
Payments for PMS with effect from the second quarter of
2012 should be based on certified truck outs at depots confirmed at the retail outlets and no longer on discharges from vessels into tank farms. Consumption should be defined in a way to exclude what is imported but only what is put in the tank.
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32.
The markets of opportunity situated within Nigerian territorial
waters which are designated “offshore Cotonou” or “offshore Lome” to qualify for FOREX payment and to evade payment of appropriate levies, dues and taxes to the Nigerian government should be discontinued forthwith. 33. A Marine Transportation System should be put in place that is
safe, secure, reliable, cost effective and efficient to reduce the present high cost of doing business in Nigeria.
34.
Any importation without permit or where the difference is
above approved quota should not be entitled to any amount on the Template. 35. It is strongly recommended that Marketers without storage
facilities and retail outlets should be excluded from participating in the PFS Scheme as this will end the bazaar that constituted a serious drain on the nation’s economy and created room for abuses.
36.
The services of the accounting firm of Akintola Williams,
Deloitte and Olusola Adekanola & Partners should be discontinued with immediate effect for professional incompetence on this particular assignment.
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37.
In view of the above the 2 firms should be blacklisted from
being engaged by any Federal Ministry, Department or Agency (MDA’s) for a period of three years. 38. This Ad-Hoc Committee shall in its monitoring stage conduct bridging
extensive and thorough investigation into the operations of the PEF(MB) in order to ascertain the management of the funds under the subsidy regime. 39. Penalties should also be indicated for non-compliance and
promptly imposed to ensure the smooth operation of the Scheme. 40. The Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) should be encouraged
within a time frame to improve on the draught level of the Nigerian waters to encourage the berthing of ALL types of vessels so as to eliminate the present ship-to-ship (STS) transfers by importers of petroleum products. 41. All those in the Federal Ministry of Finance, Office of the
Director-General Budget, and the Office of the Accountant General of the Federation involved in the extra budgetary expenditure under the PSF Scheme (2009-2011) should be sanctioned in accordance with the Civil Service Rules and the Code of Conduct Bureau. 42. The payment of N999,000,000 in 128times within 24hrs
(12th& 13th January, 2009) by the Office of the Accountant -General
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of the Federation should be further investigated by relevant AntiCorruption Agencies.
43.
The National Assembly should enact an Act to criminalise
extra budgetary expenditure. 44. CBN and the Federal Ministry of Finance should critically
examine and review the policy guiding payment for importation of petroleum products to avoid the current fraudulent system that allows importers to bring in products from off-shore “Lome” or “Cotonou” to qualify for forex payments. 45. The Committee notes that several alarms were raised by the
CBN on the escalation of subsidy figures but these early warning signals were ignored by relevant agencies. The Committee wishes to encourage whistle –blowing by regulatory agencies on threats to the economy with the hope that proactive measures could be taken. 46. The Committee recommends that the PPMC Management be
overhauled. In furtherance to above recommendations of the committee, institutional mechanisms be urgently developed to ensure the monitoring of actual delivery of kerosene to the Nigerian masses. 47. The PPMC should deploy modern state-of-the-art devices to
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protect its facilities and pipelines to eliminate wastages arising from
vandalism. In the short-term however, PPMC should establish a surveillance system which should incorporate Community-protection and using part of the bridging funds on the PSF Template to finance this. 48. All the extant circulars preventing the Nigeria Customs Service
from carrying out its statutory functions be immediately withdrawn by the Central Bank of Nigeria and the Federal Ministry of Finance. 49. The Committee recommends that NNPC takes immediate
action to pay the N46billion owed the Nigeria Customs Service and the N6billion owed to the Nigeria Ports Authority
50.
The failure of NPA to provide this Committee the vital vessel
data particularly the IMO numbers is an indication that either NPA has a very poor record keeping system or that it was a deliberate ploy to cover up the collusion between its officials and importers. We recommend an investigation into the operations and activities of this Authority. 51. The port operations of the Nigerian Ports Authority be
investigated with a view to determining the extent to which its officials are complicit in the classification of maritime areas for reception of Nigerian bound petroleum products as “offshore Cotonou” and “offshore Lome” in the face of evidence that these Vessels never did lighter at those Ports.
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52.
In the course of this investigation, a lot of efforts were made
to establish cases of round tripping and diversion of products, including the use of the data from Llyods List Intelligence resulting in the cases so far reported. However given the scale of connivance and collusion by government officials involved in the certification process, the Committee believes that further investigation will reveal more cases. It is therefore recommended that all the data obtained in the course of this investigation, especially from the Llyods List Intelligence be forwarded to the relevant anti-corruption agencies for a more detailed investigation. 53. The present Management of PEF (M)B should be overhauled comprise of persons of
and the Board when constituted should
impeccable integrity who should be knowledgeable in aspects of its mandate. This is without prejudice to the coming into force of the Petroleum Industry Act. 54. PEF(M)B should establish a tracking system on all trucks from
point of loading to point of discharge (retail outlets) and direct that all trucks involved with transportation of products should install approved tracking devices on them. 55. It is hereby recommended that the regulatory capacity of the
DPR be strengthened. The National Assembly should commence the process of amending the Act to make the Agency autonomous.
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56.
The DPR should take immediate steps to bring all facilities and
depot owners into compliance with international best practices by ensuring the installation of modern metering gadgets and sealable and non-return valves, to eliminate the rampant cases of roundtripping. 57. The DPR should brace up to its role of Regulation and compel
the NNPC/PPMC to comply with all the regulations issued to ensure transparency and accountability. 58. In order to reduce and gradually eliminate lightering,
associated inefficiency and cost, Government should invest in the provision of Single Point Mooring (SPM’s). This provision should be followed up by instituting Regulations to compel Owners of Jetties, depots and storage facility owners to develop pipeline throughput availability to facilitate direct delivery of imported products by heavy vessels, in-shore Nigeria. 59. There should be a deliberate policy by Government to
encourage the utilization of gas in automobile, domestic (cooking), and industrial facilities. 60. As a matter of urgency and in furtherance of our national security requirements, a national strategic reserve should be immediately enhanced so to accommodate 90days stop gap strategic reserve.
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61.
We strongly recommend that relevant Standing Committees of
the National Assembly should be more proactive in their oversight responsibilities to forestall future occurrences.
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CONCLUSION
The Committee wishes to thank the Leadership of the House of Representatives for the confidence and support while the assignment lasted. Also, worth thanking are all Nigerians, Companies, Unions etc. who either openly or privately offered their services/support to the Committee. We also express our gratitude to the media for their very intensive and consistent support especially Channels Television for bringing the proceedings of the Public Hearings of the Committee live to Nigerian homes. The Committee can affirm that almost all the critical questions/issues raised at the beginning of this investigation have been answered conclusively. However, those not conclusively answered as a result of time and technicalities involved, are being recommended for further inquiry/action. For instance, it is safe to say that the daily consumption of PMS by Nigerians is 31 million litres while that of Kerosene is 10 million as against other incoherent figures being branded by relevant officers. The cost of importation per litre is determined more by the Platts price. However, the over padding and wastage imbedded on the template hitherto being used by PPPRA encourages higher landing
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cost. This is why the Committee recommendation on urgent review of the constituents of the template should be implemented without delay. The sum of N2, 657.087 trillion was paid as subsidy as at December, 31st in 2011 and the process of approvals (pre-qualification, allocation, verification, certification and payment) are all but flawless. The difference between N2, 657.087 trillion paid as at December 2011 and N245 billion Appropriated (900%) is the extra-budgetary approvals and payment by the operators of the PSF Scheme and which tantamount to gross Constitutional breach. The state of our refineries is nothing to write home about as it appears that greed, corruption etc among operators in the downstream sector colluded to strangulate the refineries despite their total installed refining capacities of 446,000 BPD. The daily allocation of 445,000 bpd to NNPC for domestic consumption if well managed and harnessed has the potentials of satisfying the daily PMS and DPK needs of Nigerians. (see the Committee recommendations). We also express our profound gratitude and appreciation to the Leadership and Honourable Members of the House of Representatives for giving us maximum support without hindrance or interference throughout the course of this assignment.
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Finally, the Committee wishes to acknowledge the support and encouragement of all Nigerians which provided the needed impetus to accomplish this task. Thank you.
Signed: 1. Rep. Farouk M. Lawan, OFR 2. Rep. Ali Babatunde Ahmad 3. Rep. James Abiodun Faleke 4. Rep. Alphonsus Gerald Irona 5. Rep. Umar Abubakar Sade 6. Rep. Eucharia Azodo 7. Rep. Abbas Tajudeen 8. Rep. John Owan Enoh Chairman Member “ “ “ “ “ “
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GLOSSARY OF TERMS
S/N 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ACRONYM AGO CBN CIF DAPMAN DMO HHK DPR FMF FO FOB GMD IPMAN ISAN JEPTFON LPG MOMAN NIMASA NLC NNPC NPA OAGF OMC’sTC’s PEF PEF(M)B PENGASSAN DEFINITION Automotive Gas Oil Central Bank of Nigeria Cost Insurance and Freight Depot and Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria Debt Management Office House Hold Kerosene Department of Petroleum Resources Federal Ministry of Finance Fuel Oil Free on Board Group Managing Director Independent Petroleum Marketers Association of Nigeria Indigenous Ship Owners Association of Nigeria Jetties and Petroleum Tank Farm Owners of Nigeria Liquefied Petroleum Gas Major Marketers Association of Nigeria Nigeria Maritime Administration and Safety Agency Nigeria Labour Congress Nigeria National Petroleum Corporation Nigeria Ports Authority Office of the Accountant General of the Federation Oil Marketing/Trading Companies Automotive Gas Oil Petroleum Equalization Fund Petroleum Equalization Fund Management Board Petroleum and Natural Gas Senior Staff Association of 206
Nigeria 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 PMS PPMC PPPRA PSF SDN STS TUC Premium Motor Spirit Pipeline Products Marketing Company Petroleum Product Pricing Regulatory Authority Petroleum Support Fund Sovereign Debt Note Ship to Ship Trade Union Congress
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LIST Schedule of Lists S/NO 1. A. B. C. D. E. F. E. F. G. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Title of List Companies involved in Subsidy that appeared before the Ad – Hoc Committee Companies that did not appear but submitted documents Companies that were invited but did not appear and did not submit documents Heads of Miniseries, Departments and Agencies that appeared before the Committee Government Agencies invited but neither appeared nor submitted documents Federal Government Consultants that appeared before the Committee Organized /professional Groups that appeared before the Committee Individuals invited that appeared or made submissions before the Committee Companies that appeared but were not involved in the Subsidy Regime Checklist expected from Importers Through – Put Agreements with respective Deports Companies without Depots and/or Through – Put agreement but participated in the PSF Marketers that never applied to PPPRA but were given allocation to supply products Marketers with no Tank Farms, no Through – Put agreement, 208 48– 49 16 33– 34 44- 48 15 15 15 14 14 12 - 14 12 - 14 9 - 12 Page.
but claimed to have discharged Products 117 LIST OF APPENDIX 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. Petroleum Products (PMS and DPK) imports for the year 2009. Presentation by PPPRA to the Committee PPPRA master data on the Marketers Details of Subsidy Payments by the Office of the Accountant General of the Federation CBN Statement of Accounts Marketers Profile by PPPRA Deport Reports by PPPRA Nigerian Ports Authority – Details of PMS/DPK Vessels handled in LPC The Role of Petroleum Products Pricing Regulatory Agency in the administration of the Petroleum Support Fund (PSF) Scheme. PMS volumes and associated Subsidy for 2009 by Marketers PMS volumes and associated Subsidy for 2010 by Marketers PMS volumes and associated Subsidy for 2011 by Marketers The Role of the Office of the Accountant General of the Federation in the implementation of the Oil Subsidy policy Presentation of the Central Bank of Nigeria on the Subsidy Regime NNPC Oil Subsidy deductions before FAAC (N) CBN statements of Account CBN statements of Account Copies of Subsidy Approvals issued to NNPC by PPPRA Jan. – Oct. 2010 Copies of Subsidy Approvals issued to NNPC by PPPRA Jan. – Oct. 2011
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Are we really practising democracy

Democracy is a type of government for those who know their rights and not those who think their can be peace without equal rights and justice. Now somebody stole and we all know. But he aint going to Jail. Is that democracy?

ARREST TURAI YARADUA

Why EFCC never think of arresting the most greedy & corrupt former first lady Turai yar'adua for investigation. She treated Nigerians like her slaves and stole alots of our government founds, we need our founds back

can u prove it.

can u prove it.

ARREST TURAI YARADUA

Why EFCC never think of arresting the most greedy & corrupt former first lady Turai yar'adua for investigation. She treated Nigerians like her slaves and stole alots of our government founds, we need our founds back

i agree,hw come EFCC has been

i agree,hw come EFCC has been silent all this while

What is your definition of scam?

The TRUTH is that going by the history of fuel subsidy expenditure in this country since 2006, subsidy payment of about N2.5 trillion or more in 2011, is PERFECTLY in order.
In 2006, the landing cost of fuel was N67 per litre but fuel was sold at N65 per litre at the pump. Thus govt paid the balance (PRICE DIFFERENTIAL) of N2 per litre as subsidy, which came to a total of N276 billion that yr.
In 2007, with the PRICE DIFFERENTIAL still at N2 per litre, a total of N278 billion was spent on subsidy.
By 2008, with the PRICE DIFFERENTIAL now about N7 per litre, a total of N633 billion was spent on subsidy.
N421 billion and N673 billion was expended on subsidy in 2009 and 2010 respectively.
By 2011, the PRICE DIFFERENTIAL had risen SHARPLY to N76 per litre (landing cost of N141 per litre minus pump price of N65) due to escalation of crude oil price. Thus expectedly N2.5 trillion was spent on subsidy in 2011. This explains everything to any SANE mind except for MISCHIEF makers

What is your defintion of scam?

We are not leaning on such figures-you just write trash because you are one of the beneficiaries of the scam.Round trippping isn't scam?Those who deliver part of 'imported' products and sell the rest outside or return or recycle it back into our shores are not involved in scam? There are several ways they ripped Naija off,processing papers collecting monies even through their overseas partners,it's no scam to you.You are one of them-THIEVES.

Re - What is your definition of scam?

Even though there is some irregularities with landing cost, no one really disputes the price differential, which is what is driving the subsidy rate, but the issue is the amount of quantity consumed, we are by no means consuming 300 - 400 million litres a day, how many cars in totality do we have on our pothole infested roads? The main fraud is in the quantity imported, I dare to say that 50% of the amount on records as import was not consumed by us Nigerians, however subsidy was paid on them, these ended up being diverted to neighbouring countries and sold at market price. Watch the Lagos Subsidy Debate on youtube. The current CBN chief testified to this, the Minister of Finance said the same thing, even Prof Tam David West was flabberghasted. So for you to say where is the scam....... it is either you are a beneficiary of this scam..

What is a scam?

I support the war against corruption but not shadow chasing. Yes about N240 billion was budgeted for subsidy in 2011 but the govt ended up spending N2.5trillion. It doesnt sound right but its nothing unusual. The PERTINENT issues are: 1) didnt we ALL buy fuel at fixed price of N65 per litre last yr?
2)was the landing cost of fuel not about N141 per litre last yr?
3)didnt the govt pay the balance of about N76per litre for YOU and I?
4)was the country not WET with fuel all thru last yr such that YOU and I didnt have to queue to buy fuel?
The extra budgetary expenditure may not be right but it's nothing unusual. It is ON RECORD that In 2007, N278 billion was spent on fuel subsidy though only N100billion was budgeted for subsidy that yr. Also in 2008, N633 billion was spent on subsidy, though nothing(zero naira) was budgeted for subsidy that yr. Mr president may have made the wrong judgement in not asking for supplementary appropriation but definitely the INTENT was not to commit fraud

REPORT ON OIL SUBSIDY WILL BE SWEPT UNDER THE CARPET!

The report if implemented will remove the stain of corruption from the image of Nigeria but l am deeply afraid,vested interest will sweep it under the carpet as they did to Ambassador Chief Felix oboro in venezuela when vested interest reviewed his case that the looting of the Embassy is the best thing to do to allow him give out bulky brown envelopes.As for EFCC,Alhaji ibrahim Lamorde should be careful,he will soon be removed from the place in order to force him to keep quiet once and for all.God bless Nigeria.Events will soon unfold to the world.

TIME TO CLEAN BAD IMAGE OF NIGERIA

The whole Nigeria is infected with CORRUPTION.The only problem is that President GEJ is carefree of the bad image from Niger Delta in general and Bayelsa State in particular.OBJ would have moved against Yorubas during his time if they had done such.l am a Lecturer from Oloibiri in Bayelsa State to show you that l know what l am writing.
You may look at the case of Ambassador felix Oboro in Venezuela.Greed made him to become drug baron,looter of embassy funds,inflating and pocketing visa and e-passport money and damaging the good image of Nigeria.FGN is aware but because he is from my State,Bayelsa,It sees no evil and talks no evil.Ambassador Oboro who was searched for drugs at airport has been reappointed because it is our turn in power.
He admitted in Sagbama,Yenagoa and in Brass that he looted embassy funds and was unto drugs.President GEJ should therefore remove him to start with the cleaning.

DONT REAPPOINT AMBASSADOR FELIX OBORO BECAUSE OF...........

Elca,my earlier comment to support yours has been deleted by the Punch.It is common knowledge that Punch is one of the on line newspapers given brown envelopes to cover up comments on big time looters,fraudsters and drug baron like Ambassador Felix Oboro whose looting of the public funds in Nigeria's Embassy in Venezuela and other drug related scandals is globally very well known but swept under the carpet as the report of oil subsidy will soon be swept under the carpet.
Ambassador Oboro should be probed now to show global community that Nigeria has honour.

MIN.OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS IN CORRUPTION GALORE

PLS. READ www.elombah.com of 25 September 2010 and thenigerianvoice.com of 7/6/2012 on Nigeria:Foreign Affairs Ministry in complicity over Ambassador Oboro in Venezuela to know that corruption is a JOY to the image of Nigeria.

The nature of this scam is stupendous!

Go to page 23: What have these companies to hide? They were invited but felt above the law and did not appear! They have strange names from Carnival to Ice to oilbath and Force! The force of the law should come hard against their directors and owners.

Pages 132 - 139: You will appreciate the rot in our Governmental agencies such as NNPC with their perfecting of the art of roundtripping and transhipment! NNPC, a very powerful government within a weak, porous and ineffective overseeing Ministry and Federal government, NEED TO BE CHECKED.

Pages 140 - 152: A-Z, AP EXEMPLIFY all the A-Z corruption tricks and sharp practices in oil industry; claiming oil susbsidy on oil not supplied, paying easy money to itself, obtaining Forex for petroleum products importation but did not supply, obtaining subsidy but did not supply oil and some not even registered with PPPRA but supplying oil! SOME EVEN HAD NO STORAGE TANKS! The nature of this scam is stupendous!

Impeachment Looming

It is now out even the bigwigs won't allow it officially because everyone is indicted from the President himself. Let the comments roll on.

continued

Did u ever wonder why he never put the subsidy back even under the crisis? He simply dropped the price of fuel to its bare minimum. Read this document again and think of what half of the stolen money could be used for. He knows the money will still be stolen to an extent, but not all of it. Certain people know their boundaries and he is one of them. So don't criticize, because if you were given the opportunity to get such 'FREE' money, u would oblige. One finger pointing, four finger back at you. Love Nigeria, would never give my life for nigeria, and will never talk bad about it even though i dont live in Nigeria . In fact, i'm white....FYI!!!

The President is not indicted

It seems whoever u are, you're not see the big picture. The President saw this issue and quickly removed it. He did this under the complete attack of nigerians whom did not knw what was going on behind their backs. I know one of the owners of the companies listed here, and i never like her one bit. We should stop criticizing Jonathan. We need to do our part to stop this governmental idiots from stealing and leaving us to go hungry. I am not against their stealing, because they are imprefect humans. Imperfect can never rule imperfect and succeed. That imperfection will always affect them. But i am against stealing so much that the people who you rule over go hungry and suffer. Jonathan whom i know without a doubt is no angel, realized that the stealing has gone beyond the allowed boundaries he efficiently did something to stop it.

Amusing

Without a doubt you are an advocate of corruption, what exactly is your stand against corruption man? You aren't against their stealing but you are against their stealing and making people go hungry! Whats the difference? You know one of the looting companies and yet you dont believe they are at fault!?!
Hey mr! An injustice to a minority is an injustice to all. Period!

Death Penalty

The only way I will know we are ready to fight corruption is if only when we amend our constitution to allow death penalty for corruption. The only thing Nigeria fears that I know is death, many at times not God. God help our Nation Nigeria. Ola-Ogedengbe