The Civil Society Election Situation Room commends Nigerians for their determination in voting and protecting their votes in the 16 April presidential election. We note that this was in keeping with what was witnessed during the National Assembly elections held the previous week.

INEC has released the final returns from all the States and the Federal Capital Territory and a winner has emerged. We believe that, in managing this Presidential election, INEC sought to comply with the applicable electoral laws and the provisions of the Constitution. However, the Civil Society Election Situation Room notes reports of quite significant anomalies at the levels of accreditation, voting and collation, which we believe require prompt, open and transparent investigation. All persons found to have been involved in any such unlawful acts which undermine the credibility of the electoral process should be held accountable. 

The contestants, their parties and supporters have a corresponding duty to respect the final results. Any complaints at this stage should be channeled through the appropriate election result verification and dispute resolution processes. The Civil Society Election Situation Room unequivocally condemns in the strongest terms the violence and killings which have attended the announcement of the results.
Accreditation and voting

Our network of observers from across the country has determined that INEC’s preparation and organization of the elections were an improvement on the National Assembly elections held the previous week. There was more timely delivery of materials, INEC officials were at their posts promptly, and voting and accreditation were largely peaceful in most of the polling units across the country. We believe that INEC made a laudable effort in ensuring that voters were free to exercise their franchise. Additionally, security officials and youth corps members deserve commendation for their roles in bringing this about.
Problems

However, the Civil Society Election Situation Room observers also noted a number of irregularities. One area of concern was significant instances of underage voting in Bauchi, Gombe, Kaduna, Kano, Plateau, Nasarawa and Taraba states. In particular, Bajoga, Funakaya LGA in Gombe State saw irate youths attempting to lynch the Resident Electoral Commissioner - along with a number of journalists - who sought to enforce the prohibition against underage voting.  A second area of concern was incidents of massive thumb-printing, as was witnessed in Soku in Akuku Toro LGA in Rivers State. In Benue State, the chairperson of Independent Publishers was caught in a vehicle with previously thumb-printed ballot papers. Again in Benue State, six ballot boxes were snatched in Achia Kyurav-Ya in Kwande LGA, and an undisclosed number were also allegedly snatched in Pus in Shough Council in Gweru East LGA by Honourable Christine Alaago.

A further area of concern was the unjustified arrest and intimidation of election observers, notably in Isiala-Ngwa in Abia State, Isiala Mbano in Imo State, Jos in Plateau State, Port Harcourt in Rivers State, and Warri North in Delta State.  Finally, we received reports of violence in various parts of the country, including the torching of government buildings, and the use of small arms and incendiary devices, resulting in several incidents of killings.

Collation
The collation process seems to have been the weakest link in the election management process. INEC appears to have been ineffective in its oversight function as far as monitoring and controlling the collation process was concerned. This state of affairs raised doubts about the authenticity of some of the figures arising from this process. Further, there were allegations that, in some cases, figures may have been doctored.  Of particular note were the exceptionally high turnout figures in Abia (77%), Akwa Ibom (75%), Bayelsa (85%), Bauchi (63%), Cross River (63%), Delta (68%), Edo (74%), Enugu (62%), Kaduna (65%), Imo (84%), Plateau (62%) and Rivers (76%) states. This was against the national average of 53%.  Such a high turnout is quite atypical of Nigerian elections and we call on INEC to rigorously investigate the authenticity of these figures.

INEC accredited a number of observers to be present at collation centres across the country, unlike what obtained in the National Assembly elections the previous week. Their presence, though a remarkable improvement on the previous exercise, seems to have had little impact on the problems associated with the collation process.

Conclusion and recommendations

Certain issues remain to be addressed by INEC: firstly, urgently enhancing the integrity of the collation process in the light of the challenges expected in the forthcoming gubernatorial elections; secondly, ensuring the safety and security of youth corps members in particular and observers in general; thirdly, continuing instances of violence in certain parts of the country.

In anticipation of the gubernatorial elections, and to further enhance the integrity of this process and its outcomes, the Civil Society Election Situation Room urges INEC to put in place mechanisms to respond promptly and transparently to any such complaints. With the announcement of results, we encourage the parties and their candidates to address such complaints to INEC, in accordance with the applicable legal and constitutional procedures.

Political leaders, for their part, have a corresponding responsibility to heal the wounds arising out of the political process, and we appeal to them to take this seriously. 

In the light of the above, the Civil Society Election Situation Room appeals to all citizens, political parties, institutions, and political, civic and community leaders to respect the sanctity of human life, the sanctity of the electoral process and the sanctity of the Nigerian Federation.

19 April 2011
 
 
For: Elections Situation Room
 
Dr Jibrin Ibrahim                                                                    Clement Nwankwo
Executive Director                                                                  Executive Director
Centre for Democracy and Development (CDD)      Policy and Legal Advocacy Centre (PLAC)
Tel: 0803 4001200                                                                  Tel: 0803 8899999

TABLE 1: NIGERIA’S  2011 PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION (APRIL 16) RESULTS  BY STATES
 


 

Compiled in present form by Nigerianmuse.com

April 18, 2011

 

S/N

STATE

PDP

CPC

ACN

Total

Of

All

20

Political

Parties

Final

 

Reg’

 

Figure

(March ‘11)

 

A

Voter

Turnout

 

 

Jonathan

Buhari

Ribadu

 

 

 

 

STATE SUMMARIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTH-WEST

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

Ekiti  

135,009

2,689

116,981

261,858

764,726

34.2%

2

Lagos   

1,281,688

189,983

427,203

1,945,044

6,108,069

31.8%

3

Ogun 

309,177

17,654 

199,555 

543,715

1,941,170

 

28.00%

4

Ondo       

387,376

11,890

74,253

486,837

1,616,091

 

30.1%

5

Osun     

188,409

6,997

299,711

512,714

1,293,967

 

39.6%

6

Oyo      

484,758

92,396

252,240

863,544

2,572,140

 

33.6%

 

TOTAL SW

2,786,417

321,609

1,369,943

4,613,712

14,296,163

32.3%

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

S/N

STATE

PDP

CPC

ACN

Total

of

all

20 

Political

Parties

Final

 

Reg’

 

Figure

(March ‘11)

 

A

Voter

Turnout

 

 

Jonathan

Buhari

Ribadu

 

 

 

 

SOUTH-EAST

 

 

 

 

 

 

7

Abia  

1,175,984

3,743

4,392

1,188,333

1,524,484

77.9%

8

Anambra  

1,145,169

4,223

3,437

1,157,239

2,011,746

 

57.5%

9

Ebonyi     

480,592

1,025

1,112

502,890

1,050,534

 

47.9%

10

Enugu

802,144

3,753

1,755

814,009

1,303,155

 

62.5%

11

Imo         

1,381,357

7,591

14,821

1,409,850

1,687,293

 

83.6%

 

TOTAL SE

4,985,246

20,335

25,517

5,072,321

7,577,212

66.9%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTH-SOUTH

 

 

 

 

 

 

12

Akwa Ibom 

1,165,629

5,348

54,148

1,232,395

1,616,873

 

76.2%

13

Bayelsa    

504,811

691

370

 506,693

591,870

 

85.6%

14

C/River      

709,382

4,002

5,889

 726,341

1,148,486

 

63.2%

15

Delta   

1,378,851

8,960

13,110

1,410,379

2,032,191

 

69.4%

16

Edo          

542,173

17,795

54,242

621,192

1,655,776

 

37.5%

17

Rivers      

1,817,762

13,182

16,382

1,854,116

2,429,231

 

76.3%

 

TOTAL SS

6,118,608

49,978

144,141

6,351,116

9,474,427

67.0%

 

                  

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NORTH-WEST

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

Jigawa  

419,252

663,994

17,355

1,140,766

2,013,974

 

56.6%

19

Kaduna

1,190,179

1,334,244

11,278

2,569,963

3,905,387

65.8%

20

Kano   

440,666

1,624,543

42,353

2,673,228

5,027,297

53.2%

21

Katsina   

428,392

1,163,919

10,945

1,639,532

3,126,898

 

52.4%

22

Kebbi   

369,198

501,453

26,171

 924,099

1,638,308

 

56.4%

23

Sokoto   

  

309,057

540,769

20,144

909,808

2,267,509

 

40.1%

24

Zamfara   

238,980

624,515

17,970 

 942,679

1,824,316

 

51.7%

 

TOTAL NW

 3,395,724

6,453,437

146,216

10,800,075

19,803,689

54.5%

 

                   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NORTH-EAST

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

Adamawa    

508,314

344,526

32,786

907,706

1,816,094

50.0%

26

Bauchi      

258,404

1,315,209

16,674

1,610,094

2,523,614

 

63.8%

27

Borno       

207,075

909,763

7,533 

1,177,646

2,380,957

 

49.5%

28

Gombe

290,347

459,898

3,420

770,019

1,318,377

 

58.4%

29

Taraba      

451,354

257,986

17,791

739,065

1,336,221

 

55.3%

30

Yobe  

117,128

337,537

6,069

622,115

1,373,796

 

45.3%

 

TOTAL NE

1,832,622

3,624,919

84,273

5,826,645

10,749,059

54.2%

 

            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NORTH-CENTRAL

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

Benue       

694,776

109,680

223,007

1,047,709

2,390,884

 

43.8%

32

Kogi

399,816

    132,201

6,516

 561,782

1,316,849

 

42.7%

33

Kwara       

268,243

83,603

52,432

 414,754

1,152,361

 

36.0%

34

Nasarawa  

408,997

278,390

1,204

 694,527

1,389,308

 

50.0%

35

Niger    

 

  

321,429

652,574

13,344

1,019,167

2,175,421

 

46.8%

36

Plateau    

1,029,865

356,551

10,181

 1,411,117

2,259,194

 

62.5%

 

TOTAL NC

3,123,126

1,612,999

306,684

5,149,056

10,684,017

48.2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FCT-ABUJA

 

 

 

 

 

 

37

Fct      

253,444

131,576

2,327

398,094

943,473

 

42.2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL COUNTRY

22,495,187

12,214,853

2,079,101

38,464,463

73,528,040

52.3%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

STATE

PDP

CPC

ACN

Total

of

all

20

Political

Parties

Final

 

Reg’

 

Figure

(March ‘11)

 

A

 

   

Jonathan

Buhari

Ribadu

 

 

 

 

GEO-POLITICAL SUMMARIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTH-WEST

2,786,417

321,609

1,369,943

4,613,712

14,296,163

32.3%

 

SOUTH-EAST

4,985,246

20,335

25,517

5,072,321

7,577,212

66.9%

 

SOUTH-SOUTH

6,118,608

49,978

144,141

6,351,116

9,474,427

67.0%

 

TOTAL  SOUTH

13,890,271

391,922

1,539,601

16,290,593

31,347,802

52.0%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NORTH-WEST

 3,395,724

6,453,437

146,216

10,800,075

19,803,689

54.5%

 

NORTH-EAST

1,832,622

3,624,919

84,273

5,826,645

10,749,059

54.2%

 

NORTH-CENTRAL

3,123,126

1,612,999

306,684

5,149,056

10,684,017

48.2%

 

TOTAL NORTH

8,351,472

11,691,355

537,173

21,775,776

41,236,765

52.8%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL FCT

253,444

131,576

2,327

398,094

943,473

 

42.2%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL COUNTRY

22,495,187

12,214,853

2,079,101

38,464,463

73,528,040

52.3%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REGIONAL SUMMARIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SOUTH

13,890,271

391,922

1,539,601

16,290,593

31,347,802

52.0%

 

NORTH

8,351,472

11,691,355

537,173

21,775,776

41,236,765

52.8%

 

FCT

253,444

131,576

2,327

398,094

943,473

 

42.2%

 

TOTAL COUNTRY

22,495,187

12,214,853

2,079,101

38,464,463

73,528,040

52.3%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

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